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SMC sophomore dance themed masquerade

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s Class of 2013 will host a black-and-white themed, formal dance to be held tonight in downtown South Bend. Attendees are encouraged to wear black and white to the dance, “Black Time Masquerade.” Masks, which are provided with the tickets, and decorations will add a splash of color to the black and white theme, Katie Gutrich, Class of 2013 president, said. She said the dance will be held at Century Center in downtown South Bend from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. Ticket sales have been extended due to their high demand, Gutrich said. Tickets will be available for purchase in the Student Center Atrium through today from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. The cost is $15 per person. “This is the first formal dance for the Class of 2013,” Gutrich said. “Hopefully this big turnout will help keep the class of 2013’s enthusiasm up.” Saint Mary’s will provide transportation to and from the dance. A trolley system will be available throughout the evening and will pick students up at Le Mans circle. Class of 2013 vice president Torrie Thompson said food will be provided at the dance and the theme will be “death by chocolate.” Some of the desserts include: cream puffs, rice krispies, éclairs, chocolate covered strawberries and pretzels, moose shooters and brownies. “We’ve worked really hard on it with the Class of 2013 in mind,” Thompson said. “My hope is that everyone enjoys it and has a good time with all their friends.”last_img read more

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Attendees reflect on intiative’s launch

first_imgNEW YORK — After spending the spring and summer of 2010 in Cairo studying abroad and interning at an Egyptian business, Notre Dame senior Shannon Coyne is writing a senior thesis about gender balance in Egypt. Given her field of study, Coyne said being in New York City for launch of Notre Dame’s research initiative, “Contending Modernities: Catholic, Muslim, secular,” was a meaningful experience. Her thesis includes her experience and observations living as an independent, western woman in Egypt. “So it’s a really great opportunity, kind of a capstone for everything I’ve been working on,” Coyne said. “My [thesis] topic is right in line with everything that we’re discussing this weekend.” Coyne, a political science and Arabic double major with a minor in Peace Studies, was one of two Notre Dame undergraduate students at Thursday and Friday’s opening events for Contending Modernities. An international research initiative, the project explores the relationship between Catholicism, Islam and secularism in a modern society. Junior Elizabeth Andrews, a double major in Arabic and anthropology, also attended the events. She said she enjoyed learning about the research related to these three topic areas. “I think it’s a really important topic in that the subject matter is incredibly politically, socially, economically relevant today, and it’s in a field in which research doesn’t regularly present itself,” Andrews said. “So it’s just good for students to see that there are people exploring these topics just because they are so important.” Andrews also said she appreciated the opportunity to see scholars work together to present their views on Catholicism, Islam and secularism. “I was really impressed to see so many scholars together collaborating and referencing one another in their own speeches,” she said. “It was also intimidating to be sitting among all of these people who I had read their work in class.” Notre Dame theology professor Fr. Paul Kollman said the speakers at the events complemented one another by addressing the three topic areas and their relationship to modernity. “I thought the talks [Thursday] got us off to a good start, each in its own way asking us interesting, comparative questions about each of the three traditions broadly conceived in the title of the project,” Kollman said. Mahan Mirza, professor of Arabic and Islamic studies at Notre Dame, is a member of Contending Modernities’ steering committee. As one of two Muslim faculty members who work in areas relating to Islam at Notre Dame, Mirza said the project interests him on both a personal and professional level. Contending Modernities and its launch in New York demonstrate a combination of “cutting edge scholarship” and public debate, Mirza said. “These are all very difficult things to do and I think that very institutions are capable of having such multi-pronged, multi-dimensional conversations,” he said. “Notre Dame is answering that call in a way.” Coyne said she also found the project’s emphasis on healthy conversation important. Contending Modernities fits her academic interests, but as a member of the Center for Social Concern’s student advisory committee, she works to engage her fellow students in dialogue. Earlier this semester, Coyne and the student advisory committee held a student conversation about the Islamic Cultural Center near ground zero, which she said was successful. “The discussion at that event was phenomenal,” she said. “And that really showed me how students at [Notre Dame] are interested in these topics and almost kind of starved for ways to talk about them outside of the classroom. So … [Contending Modernities] is a wonderful opportunity for us to engage with these issues and think about how we can serve to bring these issues back to school with us and work with our peers to talk about these issues.” While Contending Modernities combines scholarship and public debate on a number of topics, Mirza said its overall meaning involves making the world a better place. Because approximately half of the world’s population is either Muslim or Catholic, he said understanding between these two religious groups is crucial. “For me, I can boil it down to trying to help us all get along and trying to understand each other,” Mirza said. “We want to have better lives, as the Grand Mufti [of Egypt Ali Gomaa] said [at the event], for our children and our grandchildren. And that’s what I think this project is all about.”last_img read more

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RecSports uses survey to gauge student needs

first_imgRecSports will release its first Student Voice survey to students randomly chosen from the University population in order to obtain feedback on the RecSports programs and facilities today. “We’re always interested in trying to make our programs better and it’s really hard to reach people who don’t participate,” RecSports Fitness Coordinator Shellie Dodd-Bell said. “We really wanted to find out from everyone, or at least a random sample of campus, what you like about RecSports, what makes you participate, and if you don’t, why don’t you?” Dodd-Bell said she hopes the survey will help provide RecSports with direction for improvement. “The ultimate goal is to be able to look at the statistical data and make the changes necessary to improve our program as soon as possible, ” Dodd-Bell said. “We can use the survey as statistical evidence that certain amenities are needed in order to justify why certain expenditures are needed down the road.” Director of RecSports Sally Derengoski said she would like to see a place where everyone can be satisfied. “First and foremost, it is about satisfaction, so we should learn about where people are really happy with our programs and facilities and where we need improvement,” Derengoski said. The survey will be sent out to a sample of students selected by Notre Dame’s Department of Institutional Research, Dodd-Bell said. “Since there are other surveys that are also going out, we wanted to make sure we didn’t bombard the same people and overwhelm them,” Dodd-Bell said. “Once the survey is received by the selected group, students will have a week and a half until a reminder is sent out to them which will give them another week and a half, so they’ll have a total of three weeks to finish it,” Dodd-Bell said. Derengoski said this survey has been done in universities across the nation and has led to great results. “We’re actually one of about 100 universities that has participated in this survey,” Derengoski said. “It’s a survey that has been created for rec programs all over the country. The company that does this makes them and then gives us not only feedback about Notre Dame students and employees, but also how we rank relative to other universities. It should really give us some great direction with our program.” The students selected to take the survey have not only the chance to provide feedback, but also the opportunity to win various prizes. Every student who completes the survey will receive a free order of breadsticks from Papa John’s and a free appetizer from Granite City Food and Brewery in Mishawaka, Dodd-Bell said. There will also be a drawing to win $500 certificates to Meijer and an iPod touch, she said.last_img read more

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Students raise funds for clean water

first_imgThe women of Howard Hall raised close to $3,500 for The Water Project, a non-profit organization that provides distressed communities with access to clean water, during the third annual Totter for Water on Thursday and Friday. From 5 p.m. Thursday until 5 p.m. Friday, participants teeter-tottered for half-hour shifts on South Quad in order to solicit donations to build a well in Africa. “We have girls out there all 24 hours signed up to take shifts,” sophomore and Howard Hall president Claire Robinson said. “It brings attention to [the fundraiser], and we ask that people donate in order to totter. It’s kind of an attraction.” People also donated online, sophomore Sarah Cahalan, one of Howard Hall’s service commissioners, said. Online donations made before the event accounted for almost $2,700 of Totter for Water’s total proceeds. Approximately 90 Howard residents and 50 others participated in Totter for Water over the course of 48 shifts, Cahalan said. Robinson said she was impressed with the number of people that stopped by the event. “I even went out there at 4:30 in the morning and we had people out there,” she said. Howard Hall hosted African-themed events last week to prepare for Totter for Water, Robinson said. “We had African Mass [and] a speaker come talk to us about his work with the wells,” she said. “Then we also had African desserts and a water documentary, and finally we had a little kick-off party with the dorm mascot.” The speaker, Stephen Silliman, professor of civil engineering and geological sciences, spoke to Howard Hall residents Monday about his experience building wells in Benin, Cahalan said. Robinson said Silliman’s talk caused her and the service commissioners to consider donating Totter for Water’s proceeds to a nation in western Africa, but they did not decide what specific country or village the donations will benefit yet. “Previously, we have designated which village or country we want the well built for, but we haven’t made the decision yet this year,” Robinson said. “I think we’re going to try to establish ourselves within the community and donate to the same well every year, but I honestly don’t know.” Robinson and Cahalan said the event raised more money this year than in past years. “The past two years that we’ve done it [the fundraiser] made about $1,000 online, and we made $2,693 [this year], so that was really exciting,” Cahalan said. “Lots of people were coming by and interested in what we were doing.”last_img read more

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Bluegrass Mass’ impresses audience at Saint Mary’s

first_imgMonroe Crossings Band and the South Bend Chamber Singers performed a unique mass at Saint Mary’s College on Sunday, merging voices, strings and the twang of bluegrass. The groups performed composer Carol Barnett’s “The World Beloved: A Bluegrass Mass” in O’Laughlin Auditorium as part of the Shaheen/Duggan Performing Arts Series. “‘A Bluegrass Mass’ combines the text of a traditional Catholic Mass, contemporary choral music, poetry and bluegrass instruments into a unique musical experience,” Barnett said in a College press release. “To bring the solemnity of the classical choir-based Mass together with the down home sparkle of bluegrass — now there’s an assignment for a composer.” Monroe Crossing began the night by performing with the South Bend Chamber Children’s Choir. Dressed in plaid shirts, jeans and suspenders, the children sang “Oh! Susanna”, “The Merry, Merry Heart” and “Cripple Creek”. “We’re bluegrass with a Scandinavian attitude,” Matt Thompson, mandolin, fiddle and vocalist for the Minnesota-based group, said. According to Nancy Menk, professor of music at Saint Mary’s College ,in a College press release, Monroe Crossings was the best band for the job. “‘A Bluegrass Mass’ is an outstanding musical piece,” Menk said. “It is tough and the rhythm is complicated. Monroe Crossing played the premiere of this unique Mass; it was written for them. The group knows the piece better than anyone. It was in our best interest to bring them here.” Despite being the best band for the job, Thompson confessed that he and his fellow band members actually forget about the performance after they agreed to it. “[We] completely forgot about it,” he said. “A year and a half later, [Barnett] came over and dropped this big stack of music in front of us.” This was an unusual encounter, Thompson said. “Bluegrass players are used to playing by ear, so most people in bluegrass don’t read music,” he said, “And some people in the band don’t even read!” After a version was recorded for the band to orally hear their parts, “A Bluegrass Mass” was born, and the band will perform it 10 times this year alone, Thompson said.last_img read more

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Project aims to connect ND with local music scene

first_imgA benefit concert on Friday will kick off The Bridge Project, a new initiative to increase connections between members of the Notre Dame and South Bend communities.The Notre Dame Student Expo, featuring five student bands and one South Bend group, will take place at 6 p.m. at The Pool, a venue located in the Central High/Stephenson Mills apartments.According to its Facebook page, The Bridge Project is an effort to increase interactions and friendships between the South Bend community and its college campuses by exposing students to the local music scene.Junior Will Murray, a student founder of initiative, said the idea for the project arose from his and others’ experiences studying abroad, where he said other universities’ campuses were more integrated into their cities.“They [students studying abroad] really just had an amazing connection with the city they were staying in and the campus they were on, just really benefitting from that connection and having a lot more to do on the weekend that Notre Dame really doesn’t have,” Murray said. “We weren’t sure there was a lot to do in South Bend, but sure enough there is, and we’ve been exploring it through our contacts in the community.”Murray said he collaborated with several other students and two community members, Pool operators Dena Woods and Lt. Gus Bennett, to create and maintain a Facebook calendar that comprehensively lists upcoming concerts and events. He said that donations from Friday’s concert would go towards developing the calendar further.“There’s tons of awesome bands in South Bend that no one really knows about,” Murray said. “Now it’s allcentralized, and people will be able to explore that and really benefit.”Dena Woods, an operator of The Pool who is working with The Bridge Project, said she hopes the Students Expo will bring the initiative to students’ attention and encourage them to explore local music.“Every time I’ve interacted with students, they don’t seem to know what we’re doing,” she said. “It’s a bit harder for students to find out about these events because they’re so isolated … we want to expose them to the space and … create an awareness of what’s going on downtown.”Woods said The Bridge Project is currently focused on developing the music scene, but the group hopes to expand into other areas, such as art, film and poetry.“Right now the easiest way, I think, to connect with college students is the music scene, so that’s definitely the driving force behind it, but we’re certainly looking to open it up to many more events,” said James Bachmayer, another founder of the project. “I just went to the farmer’s market yesterday, actually, and brought a couple friends, and there was a nice post on the website. When I was there a lot of vendors were talking about these events that aren’t music-related that are happening throughout the month, so we definitely want this to be a catalyst for future growth.”Murray said he hopes the concert will encourage students from all college campuses in South Bend to get involved with the project and apply their majors to aspects of the campaign, such as graphic design. He said he also wants students to attend events on the calendar and form bands to perform at local venues.“Once we pop this bubble and get the connection flowing, we can just accomplish so many things,” he said.For more information on The Bridge Project and the Students Expo, visit the group’s Facebook page or contact them at thebridgeprojectSB@gmail.com.last_img read more

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ND sociologist examines ‘trophy wife’ stereotype

first_imgDo “trophy wives” really exist? Do wealthy men marry women solely for their beauty? Does perceived attractiveness have any impact on how people select their partners?Elizabeth McClintock, assistant professor of sociology, set out to answer these questions by conducting research on the “trophy wife” stereotype and its impact in determining partner selection. Her research “Beauty and Status: The Illusion of Exchange in Partner Selection?” will be published in the American Sociological review.“I’ve always been interested in how gender stereotypes are mostly really inaccurate,” she said. “The trophy wife stereotype, to me, was a really obvious one. The belief in that stereotype is pretty powerful across a lot of cultures”.In her study, McClintock used a large, nationally representative sample of couples rated on attractiveness while factoring in levels of education, socioeconomic status and other traits. Her findings indicated that the levels of attractiveness and socioeconomic status from both partners were typically well-matched.The results also suggested that people who use beauty to gain socio-economic status through their partners were rare. According to McClintock, the only couples who exhibited a closer adherence to the trophy wife stereotype were younger couples in less-committed relationships.“I took data that ranked couples’ attractiveness and showed that people mostly match on beauty,”  McClintock said. “What my data says is that if you have a really big sample of couples, [the trophy wife stereotype] doesn’t happen enough for it to be a statistically significant pattern in the data.”McClintock said the belief in the trophy wife stereotype arises from a cultural tendency to selectively observe certain traits in partners depending on their gender, such as mainly observing physical appearance in women and socioeconomic status in men. She said she hopes that her research will help broaden public perceptions on partner selection and help dispel myths regarding the ways people view men and women in relationships“I hope that it has an impact in terms of how people think of valuing men and women,” McClintock said. “ The trophy wife stereotype tells women that your achievements don’t matter; it’s only about how you look. It sets marriage as something very shallow.”McClintock  said the belief in the trophy wife status also presents a problematic issue in sociological circles. She said sociologists often demonstrate reluctance to embrace the simpler explanation of partner selection — that partners tend to match on the majority of aspects — and rather tend to formulate complex patterns of beauty-status exchange.“I hope that it will have an effect in academia. I think that there is a tendency in academia for people to look for the truth in stereotypes and sometimes to look for a more complicated story,” McClintock said. “I think sometimes sociologists tend to ignore the obvious and look for a more complicated pattern.”McClintock said she is currently expanding her research on partner selection by investigating assumptions regarding interracial couples, specifically the idea that Caucasian men and women only marry partners who identify as minorities if they are considered to have a higher income or education.“I want to continue looking at these gender-race stereotypes in partner selection,” McClintock said. “I hope to show that people actually select people they are compatible with.”Tags: marriage, Notre Dame, partner selection, sociology, trophy wifelast_img read more

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“Biggest Loser” duo talk about body image

first_imgSaint Mary’s College welcomed a mother-daughter pair of contestants from season 11 of “The Biggest Loser”  to discuss their weight loss journey on the show and beyond.Marci and Courtney Cozier from Gary, Indiana, came to Carroll Auditorium for the Tuesday night presentation, which was part of Love Your Body Week.Marci Cozier initially weighed 238 pounds and lost 86 pounds for a final weight of 152. She is the first contestant ever on “The Biggest Loser” to reach her goal weight while on the Ranch. Marci Cozier’s daughter Courtney initially weighed 323 pounds and lost 110 pounds for a final weight of 213 pounds.Marci Cozier said her daughter was the sole inspiration for her to be on the reality television show — she initially told the show’s producers that she hated the show because she thought it exploits fat people.Marci Cozier said she quit her job of 32 years at a health and fitness center to be on the show for her daughter. Courtney Cozier had been battling weight loss for years before being accepted onto the show and even dropped out of school twice in order to be considered for acceptance.“At one point Courtney was over 400 pounds,” Marci Cozier said. “I did it for her.”With Jillian Michaels and Bob Harper as their personal trainers, they were able to begin their journey. Marci Cozier said she could not have done it without her daughter to push her and inspire her whole way.Marci Cozier said she focused on what she thought was best for her daughter. She and the other mothers there made an agreement to drink as much water as they could before their next weigh-in so that they would not reach the goal and therefore be sent home. Michaels heard of what they were doing and pulled Marci aside asking why she was hindering herself from reaching her goal, she said.“It’s God first, and then family and everything else. I’m not in that equation,” Marci Cozier said.Marci Cozier said after talking to Michaels, she reflected on their conversation through prayer.“That’s when I realized that God lives right inside of me, and if God’s first, that means I’m first,” Marci Cozier said. “You can’t take care of others unless you take care of yourself first.”“I learned to love the show because I realized what the show was about: mind, body, spirit.”Courtney Cozier agreed and said “The Biggest Loser” was not just about losing weight. She said the show gave people hope.“That is something the TV show doesn’t show America,” Courtney Cozier said. “It takes a while to change your body, but it takes a split second to change your mind,”Marci and Courtney Cozier said they learned that lasting weight loss is reliant on a strong foundation.”I know that when I go home, I have a plan, and if I deviate, I know I can go right back to it,” Marci Cozier said.Courtney Cozier said being healthy is not just about the long-term goal, but about the daily or weekly goals.“You have to celebrate the small victories too,” she saidThey both emphasized the importance of creating a balance between everything in their lives.“I’m healthier and happier on the inside because I found a balance,” Marci Cozier said. “We have to have peace in our mind before we can have peace in our body.”Sophomore Ellen Raymond said she was most inspired by the Coziers’ faith during their journey.“I liked how they talked about spirituality and the fact that it’s okay to have different opinions on loving your body,” Raymond said. ““I plan to not being so consumed with outside influences and working out and doing good things for myself and my body alone.”Senior Lauren Osmanski said she found their view on inner beauty most inspiring.“It wasn’t about the weight loss; it was about changing her mental state and being more secure about her inner beauty,” Osmanski said.Freshman Liana O’Grady said she planned to take what the mother-daughter team had said and apply it to her everyday life.“I plan to look at things as steps rather than the big picture at first — I want to be proud of my accomplishments in the moment,” O’Grady said.Tags: Biggest Loserlast_img read more

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University Health Services debuts electronic records

first_imgThis year, University Health Services (UHS), based in St. Liam Hall, has implemented Electronic Medical Records (EMR), a move director Sharon McMullen says will improve the quality and efficiency of care on campus.The change from paper to electronic records has a multitude of upsides, McMullen said, including an increase in student safety.Lindsey Meyers “Our EMR interfaces with a national drug pharmacy database, and if we prescribe a medication that a student has an allergy to, the EMR alerts us to that,” McMullen said.McMullen said the EMR will also increase the efficiency of care, since the use of paper charts in the past meant necessary patient information was much harder to organize and locate.“The student waits while we go scurrying around for the paper charts, so it disrupts the continuity of care,” McMullen said.In addition, McMullen said the EMR will make it easier for students to monitor their own medical information.“The EMR brings our patient portal into the 21st century, so now we can transmit a student’s lab results directly to her through a secure portal,” she said.McMullen said another major positive of the switch to EMR is access to an enormous amount of data.“We have the ability to take big data, and use it to improve the quality of the Notre Dame student population, because now we’ll be able to make data-driven decisions,” she said.For example, McMullen said if she sees an earlier than expected spike in influenza patients, UHS can “bump up [their] flu vaccine blitz” in response.However, the rollout of EMR will not be without its challenges for UHS, she said.“The convenience comes at a really high cost of learning curve,” McMullen said. “So say you’re a provider and you’ve been working for 20 years, and you’re used to paper records, and now suddenly you’ve got this big, complex system to learn.”As a result, McMullen said UHS will require time to reach the high level of efficiency she eventually expects with EMR. In the meantime, McMullen said, UHS is adjusting so students are not neglected during this transition.“We’re really concerned about students having to wait to get in to see providers, so to combat that, we’ve loosened up our scheduling, we’ve asked our providers to come off of their administrative time, and we’ve doubled up at some high volume times,” McMullen said.Currently, McMullen said UHS is also conducting an Organizational Analysis and Design (OAD), which is a process aimed at finding avenues for positive change within an organization.“We’re at a place right now where we can really think more comprehensively about what our current students need, and question whether we are really meeting the needs of contemporary college students,” she said.One goal of the OAD process is to continue and expand medical education for UHS’s clinicians, which has been a focus of McMullen’s since she became director over two years ago.“We are trying to clarify both financial and operational support for clinicians to go to conferences, to pay for their licensure, and to engage in professional studies,” McMullen said.McMullen said another goal for the future is to provide care at a greater range of times.“I think our students need availability to providers beyond the nine to five,” McMullen said.Tags: Electronic Medical Records, EMR, St. Liam Hall, UHS, University Health Serviceslast_img read more

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Professor examines political implications of rising secularism in the United States

first_imgNDVotes hosted this semester’s first installment of Pizza, Pop and Politics on Tuesday night, exploring the political causes and consequences of the rapid increase of non-religion and secularism in the United States.The discussion was led by Geoffrey Layman, a political science professor at Notre Dame. Anna Mason | The Observer Students attend “Pizza, Pop and Politics” in the Geddes Coffee House. Professor Geoffrey Layman discussed the political implications and causes of rising secularism in the United States.Layman began by giving a brief background on the research he conducted alongside professor David Campbell, a professor of American democracy and chairperson of the political science department at Notre Dame, and professor John Green, a political science professor at the University of Akron.As a general trend, wealth leads to secularization within a country, Layman said. Compared to other economically developed nations, the United States is much more religious, and that has long been the case, he added.“The United States has always been known as the great exception to secularization,” Layman said. “But over the last 25 years, we have seen what has become known as the rise of the ‘nones.’”The term “nones,” Layman said, refers to the group of people that, when asked their religious preference on surveys, don’t answer as Protestant, Catholic, Jewish, or another religion; they answer “none.” From 1972 to 1992, the percentage of Americans saying they had no religion or no religious affiliation was quite low, at somewhere between 5 and 8 percent, Layman said. Around the early 1990s, this began to change, and there has been a sharp increase in non-religion since. Layman said 22-23 percent of Americans today fall into this category, which is now competing with Evangelical Protestantism for the position of largest “religious group” in the U.S.Layman’s research examines the possible political causes and consequences of America’s secular turn by asking two questions: What accounts for the rapid increase in non-religion? And what are the consequences of growing non-religion and secularism for American political life?Politics — particularly the growing associations in the U.S. between religion and the Republican conservative — may be partially responsible for increasing secularism in the United States, Layman said.“Over the last three or four decades, as the so-called ‘religious right’ has emerged and mobilized conservative Evangelical Protestants into politics and has become increasingly influential within the Republican party — and the Republican coalition has become increasingly religious — people may have begun to associate religion with the Republican party and political conservatism,” he said.Layman said his research supports this theory.“Americans associate religious people and non-religious people more with one party than the other,” he said. “When surveyed, about 45 percent of people said that religious people are mainly Republicans … but virtually no one said that religious people are mainly Democrats. Just the opposite when it comes to non-religious people; almost 50 percent said non-religious people are mainly Democrats … but no one said they’re mainly Republicans. “So there does appear to be a pretty clear sense, at least among some Americans, that being religious means being Republican and being non-religious means being a Democrat.”The increasing association of religion with the Republican side of politics may have alienated Democrats and liberals from religion itself and helped drive an increase in non-religion, Layman said. He said the most obvious implication of this is that political parties in the United States will continue to grow more polarized along religious and cultural lines, largely affecting how they view American culture.“The Republican America is very traditional, very religious,” Layman said. “The Democratic America is becoming increasingly secular. [They are becoming] two incompatible forces that can’t talk to each other, much less compromise with each other.” But Republicans are included in this pattern of secularization, too, Layman said; as society grows less religious, so do they. Layman said this creates the possibility for intra-GOP conflict along religious lines. Layman said there also exists the possibility of a “new culture war,” as described by Peter Beinart in his article, “Breaking Faith: The culture war over religious morality has faded; in its place is something much worse.”“We might think that as religion declines and the percentage of ‘nones’ grows that this a positive thing, because it gets us away from the old culture war between religious people — who are very pro-life, opposed to same-sex marriage, more conservative on traditional family roles — versus less religious people, who are more liberal regarding those things,” Layman said. “But, as Beinart writes in his article, it’s possible that this culture war is only being replaced.”Layman said Beinart argues a new culture war has emerged that is not based on religion or morality. It is founded on the basis of what he refers to as “tribe,” which involves race, ethnicity, and nationality instead. And this culture war, Layman said, could be an even nastier one. Tags: non-religion, Politics, secularizationlast_img read more

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