Our Blog

Arc Vector Is Fast Fancy And Expensive

first_imgSource: Electric Vehicle News Jaguar Enters Electric Motorcycle Biz With Arc Vector This Pocket Rocket Isn’t Your Typical Missile-Shaped E-Bike Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on November 8, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News The photos are still a bit dark, but now we can finally see the Vector in its full glory. The “tank,” which isn’t actually a gas tank because the bike is electric, is the tallest point of the bike, with the seat and handlebars slung low. Its short rear end emulates classic cafe racer styling, but the smooth lines and curved surfaces give it a futuristic look. The Vector features a monocoque body rather than a traditional frame, which contains its motor and battery. The front suspension is particularly unique consisting of a car-like wishbone made of carbon fiber, which also integrates the front fender. More traditional top-end components, such as an Ohlins TTX suspension and Brembo Stylema calipers, make an appearance as well.The Vector’s numbers are quite impressive: 103 kilowatts (about 138 horsepower), a top speed of 200 kilometers per hour (124 miles per hour), and a 16.8-kilowatt-hour battery that charges in 30 minutes. Other numbers vary depending on whether you’re looking at the website or product brochure. Its highway range is 120 miles in both, but while the brochure lists a city mileage of 200 miles, the website gives a more conservative figure of 170. The website gives an impressive 0-60 time of 2.7 seconds, but according to the brochure, it takes a more leisurely 3.1. Regardless, all of these figures are excellent for an electric motorcycle, whichever ones you believe.As previously mentioned, the Vector also comes with its own helmet, which it calls the Zenith, and jacket, which it calls the Origin, which fully integrate with the Vector. The Zenith incorporates a multifunction heads-up display including a speedometer, navigation, and even a rear-view camera like the Skully promised. The Zenith jacket, meanwhile, not only provides the same protection as any riding jacket, it also communicates with the rider through tactile functions. Urban mode focuses on safety and alerts riders to nearby obstacles with a vibration or “tap” on the shoulder. In Sport mode, the jacket delivers information about the bike’s performance and how close to the limit you are riding. Euphoric mode sends your music into your body, complete with bass thumps. I’m sure this type of feedback would take some getting used to, but once you get a feel for it (pun fully intended) I can see how it could be useful (or useless but cool, in the case of Euphoric mode), providing information without taking the rider’s attention off the road.The Vector also has one other impressive number: the price, $117,000. Only 399 Vectors will be produced during its first year. But those 399 customers are certain to receive an exclusive, high-tech, and unique ride. Arc Continues To Tease the Vector Before EICMA Its range and performance are impressive, but you’ll pay the price for it.Finally, Arc turned on the lights for its electric cafe racer, the Vector, at EICMA. It boasts some impressive numbers, one of which is the six-figure price tag.More E-Bikeslast_img read more

Read More »

Tesla shouldnt reach volume Model 3 standard battery pack production until midyear

first_imgSource: Charge Forward Tesla CEO Elon Musk has clarified the situation around the production ramp-up of the new base Model 3 – saying that the vehicle won’t reach volume production until mid-year’. more…The post Tesla shouldn’t reach volume Model 3 standard battery pack production until ‘mid-year’, says Musk appeared first on Electrek.last_img

Read More »

Motorcycle pioneer Erik Buell launches new electric motorcycle brand Fuell

first_imgFamed motorcycle designer Erik Buell unveiled his new electric motorcycle brand today. In addition to a futuristic-looking new electric motorcycle design, the company also debuted a tech-infused electric bicycle. more…The post Motorcycle pioneer Erik Buell launches new electric motorcycle brand ‘Fuell’ appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

Read More »

SelfIndulgent Post of the Week Take Your Eye Off the Ball

first_imgWhat are your answers to these questions? 1 0You need to login in order to vote What I’ve been reading: I just finished reading Take Your Eye Off the Ball by Pat Kirwan. Kirwan is a former NFL coach and staffer who worked with, among others, Pete Carroll and Bill Belichick. I’ve been asked before what a good book is for beginners, and this is probably the best one I’ve read for that purpose. It’s a little elementary if you’re a hardcore fan or an experienced player/coach, but there are still some good stories in there, even if they’re spread out a little bit. If you’re getting into football or don’t really understand offense, defense, roster movement, the scouting process, etc., I highly recommend it. What I’m looking forward to: Going to the gym. The off-season is a great time for me to get into shape. (Conversely, the season is a great time for me to get out of shape.) Now that I have time to work out between football meetings, workouts, etc., I’m in better shape than I have been in a long time. I used to do a lot of cardio, but right now I’m just eating healthfully and lifting a lot of weights. Exercise has always been a big part of my life, but it’s hard to get in a good workout when you’re supervising a football team and doing other football-related tasks. Naturally, I do a variety of exercises, but I’ve been doing a lot of deadlifts lately. What I’ve been watching: Black Mirror on Netflix. I just finished season two. This isn’t a new show or anything, so you’ve probably heard of it if you have Netflix, but it’s a very thought-provoking look at the future of technology use and the direction our society is headed. Tags: self-indulgence, what I’ve been readinglast_img read more

Read More »

NewYorkPresbyterian shares information on stroke risk and prevention

first_img Reduce salt intake. High blood pressure is one of the leading causes of stroke. Cutting back on salt is one of the most significant steps to maintaining or lowering blood pressure to a healthy level of 130/80 or below. Americans get most of their sodium from processed and restaurant foods so compare and check labels on packaged foods. When flavoring your own food, try substituting salt with other spices. Eat a heart-healthy diet. Maintaining a healthy balance between your good cholesterol (HDL) and bad cholesterol (LDL) is the best way to prevent high cholesterol, heart disease and reduce your risk of stroke. Cholesterol levels should remain at 200 mg/dl or below. Eat a balanced diet with plenty of high-fiber foods, such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes and nuts, while reducing high-calorie, processed foods and beverages that don’t contain a lot of nutrients. Stop smoking. Smoking is harmful not only to your lungs but your brain as well. Because smoking damages blood vessels, raises blood pressure and speeds up the clogging of arteries, people who smoke are at twice the risk of having a stroke. Exercise. Exercise benefits everyone, so we should all aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise multiple times a week to improve our overall health. If you are obese or overweight, your risk for high cholesterol, high blood pressure and diabetes increases and so does your risk for stroke. Limit alcohol: Heavy alcohol use – more than one to two drinks a day – increases your blood pressure and your risk of ischemic attack and hemorrhagic stroke. Related StoriesUse of statins linked to reduction of mortality risk in dementia patientsMeasuring blood protein levels in diabetic patients to predict risk of strokeNew method improves detection of atrial fibrillation in stroke survivorsIt’s important to note that certain populations are at a higher risk of having a stroke, even after making the proper lifestyle changes. These include adults 55 years of age or older, African Americans and Hispanics, those with a family history of stroke and people who have already had a stroke or a transient ischemic attack (mini stroke). In addition, women are more likely to die from a stroke than men, although attacks are more common in men.A recognized leader in stroke treatment and research, NewYork-Presbyterian treats one of the highest volumes of stroke and cerebrovascular disease patients in the world and the highest in New York City. The Hospital is certified by the Joint Commission as a Comprehensive Stroke Center – the highest level of stroke certification a hospital can receive. May 2 2018Every 40 seconds someone in the U.S. has a stroke, and every four minutes, someone dies from a stroke, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Stroke is the leading cause of permanent disability in the U.S. and the fifth leading cause of death. The earlier a stroke is recognized and treated, the greater the chance of recovery. In recognition of National Stroke Awareness Month, NewYork-Presbyterian is sharing information on stroke risk and prevention.Remembering the acronym “BE FAST” is a simple way to learn how to recognize the signs of a stroke and act quickly to minimize its long-term damaging effects.”It takes less than a minute for a stroke to change a person’s life forever,” said Dr. Ji Y. Chong, site chief of neurology and director of the Stroke Center at NewYork-Presbyterian Lower Manhattan Hospital and assistant professor of clinical neurology at Weill Cornell Medicine. “Taking the time to make a few simple lifestyle adjustments and finding out how to recognize an attack when it happens can save lives.”Here, Dr. Chong shares five stroke prevention tips:center_img Source:https://healthmatters.nyp.org/last_img read more

Read More »

When is insurance not really insurance When you need pricey dental care

first_img This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente. May 21 2018I’m 61 years old and a San Francisco homeowner with an academic position at the University of California-Berkeley, which provides me with comprehensive health insurance. Yet, to afford the more than $50,000 in out-of-pocket expenses required for the restorative dental work I’ve needed in the past 20 years, I’ve had to rely on handouts — from my mom.This was how I learned all about the Great Divide between medicine and dentistry — especially in how treatment is paid for, or mostly not paid for, by insurers. Many Americans with serious dental illness find out the same way: sticker shock.For millions of Americans — blessed in some measure with good genes and good luck — dental insurance works pretty well, and they don’t think much about it. But people like me learn the hard way that dental insurance isn’t insurance at all — not in the sense of providing significant protection against unexpected or unaffordable costs. My dental coverage from UC-Berkeley, where I have been on the public health and journalism faculties, tops out at $1,500 a year — and that’s considered a decent plan.Dental policies are more like prepayment plans for a basic level of care. They generally provide full coverage for routine preventive services and charge a small copay for fillings. But coverage is reduced as treatment intensifies. Major work like a crown or a bridge is often covered only at 50 percent; implants generally aren’t covered at all.In many other countries, medical and dental care likewise are segregated systems. The difference is that prices for major procedures in the U.S. are so high they can be out of reach even for middle-class patients. Some people resort to so-called dental tourism, seeking care in countries like Mexico and Spain. Others obtain reduced-cost care in the U.S. from dental schools or line up for free care at occasional pop-up clinics.Underlying this “insurance” system in the U.S. is a broader, unstated premise that dental treatment is somehow optional, even a luxury. From a coverage standpoint, it’s as though the mouth is walled off from the rest of the body.My humbling situation is not about failing to brush or floss, not about cosmetics. My two lower front teeth collapsed just before my 40th birthday. It turned out that, despite regular dental care, I had developed an advanced case of periodontitis — a chronic inflammatory condition in which pockets of bacteria become infected and gradually destroy gum and bone tissue. Almost half of Americans 30 and older suffer from mild to severe forms of it.My diagnosis was followed by extractions, titanium implants in my jaw, installation of porcelain teeth on the implants, bone grafts, a series of gum surgeries — and that was just the beginning. I’ve since had five more implants, more gum and bone grafts and many, many new crowns installed.At least I’ve been able to get care. The situation is much worse for people with lower incomes and no family support. Although Medicaid, the state-federal insurer for poor and disabled people, covers children’s dental services, states decide themselves on whether to offer benefits for adults. And many dentists won’t accept patients on Medicaid, child or adult, because they consider the reimbursement rates too low.The program typically pays as little as half of what they get from patients with private insurance. For example, as Kaiser Health News reported in 2016, Medicaid in Colorado pays $87 for a filling on a back tooth and $435 for a crown, compared with the $150 and $800 that private patients typically pay.”It’s really a labor of love to do it,” said Dana Lubet, a recently retired dentist in Madison, Wis., who estimated Medicaid paid only a third of his costs. Accepting too many, he said, “could easily kill your practice.”A few years ago, while in his mid-50s, Nick DiGeronimo, a facility maintenance worker at a New Jersey sports center, obtained private insurance coverage through the Affordable Care Act, hoping to get treatment for progressive tooth decay.He needed two implants but, to his dismay, the plan did not cover them. To pay the $10,500 bill, he had to take out loans. “Dental insurance is basically useless,” said DiGeronimo. “It’s a sham, a waste of money, and another case of the haves versus the have-nots.”As for older Americans, many lose employer-based dental coverage when they retire even as they suffer from increasing dental problems. Among those 65 and older, 70 percent have some form of periodontal disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Yet basic Medicare plans do not include dental coverage, although options exist for seniors to purchase it.Overall, in 2015, almost 35 percent of American adults of working age did not have dental insurance. By contrast, only about 12 percent of American adults under 65 did not have medical insurance in 2016. That lack of coverage and treatment can diminish economic and social opportunities — for instance, it can be costly at work or in a job interview not to smile because of unsightly or missing teeth.Related StoriesSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerEventually, poor prevention and treatment can become a medical problem — leading to serious, and occasionally deadly, health consequences. In an infamous 2007 case — described by Mary Otto in her book “Teeth: The Story of Beauty, Inequality and the Struggle for Oral Health in America” — Deamonte Driver, a 12-year-old boy in Maryland, died after a tooth infection spread to his brain. The family’s Medicaid coverage had lapsed.Research has demonstrated links between periodontal infections and chronic conditions like diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Studies have found associations between periodontitis and adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as premature labor and low birth weight. Tooth problems also hinder chewing and eating, affecting nutritional status.The split between the medical and dental professions, however, has deep roots in history and tradition. For centuries, extracting teeth fell to tradesfolk like barbers and blacksmiths — doctors didn’t concern themselves with such bloody surgeries.In the U.S., the long-standing rift between doctors and dentists was institutionalized in 1840, when the University of Maryland refused to add training in dentistry and oral surgery to its medical school curriculum — leading to the creation of the world’s first dental school.Dentists have in some ways benefited from the separation — largely escaping the corporate consolidation of American medicine, with many making good livings in smaller practices. Patients often willingly pay out-of-pocket, at least to a point.Some people deliberately forgo dental coverage, considering it less urgent than having insurance against medical catastrophes. “You might not get a job as hostess at the restaurant, but by the same token people that have a lot of missing teeth live to tell the tales,” Lubet said.With fluoridation and advances in treatment, many Americans have come to take the health of their teeth for granted and shifted their attention to more cosmetic concerns. And the dental field has profited from the business.In my experience, which includes extensive travel in other countries, Americans often seem disoriented or even horrified when confronted with imperfect dentition. During my period of intense dental care here, I hated wearing temporaries and often braved the public with missing front teeth. I found myself routinely reassuring people that, yes, I knew about the gap, and yes, I was having it dealt with.Meanwhile, the bold line between what is covered or what is not often strikes patients as nonsensical.Last fall, Lewis Nightingale, 68, a retired art director in San Francisco, needed surgery to deal with a benign tumor in the bone near his upper right teeth. The oral surgeon and the ear, nose and throat doctor consulted and agreed the former was best suited to handle the operation, although either one was qualified to do it.Nightingale’s Medicare plan would have covered a procedure performed by the ear, nose and throat doctor, he said. But it did not cover the surgery in this case because it was done by an oral surgeon — a dental specialist. Nightingale had no dental insurance, so he was stuck with the $3,000 bill.If only his tumor had placed itself just a few inches away, he thought.”I said, what if I had nose cancer, or throat cancer?” Nightingale said. “To separate out dental problems from anything else seems arbitrary. I have great medical insurance, so why isn’t my medical insurance covering it?”This story was produced by Kaiser Health News, which publishes California Healthline, a service of the California Health Care Foundation.last_img read more

Read More »

Scientists discover new mechanism controlling multiple sclerosis risk

first_img Source:https://ki.se/en/news/mechanism-controlling-multiple-sclerosis-risk-identified Jun 19 2018While the DNA sequence remains the same throughout a person’s life, the expression of the encoded genes may change with time and contribute to disease development in genetically predisposed individuals. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have now discovered a new mechanism of a major risk gene for multiple sclerosis (MS) that triggers disease through so-called epigenetic regulation. They also found a protective genetic variant that reduces the risk for MS through the same mechanism. The study is published in Nature Communications.Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, affecting people at a relatively young age. Most are between 20 and 40 years old when they get the first symptoms, in the form of, for example numbness in the arms and legs, visual impairment and dizziness, but also fatigue and depression. The symptoms are caused by an inflammation in the brain and the spinal cord that breaks down the myelin sheath protecting the nerves, thus damaging the axons. Currently there is no cure for MS, but the disease activity can often be halted through medication.Related StoriesNature of social cognitive deficits in people with progressive multiple sclerosisResearchers move closer to finding the root cause of MSNovel imaging molecule reveals brain changes linked to progressive MSAlready over 40 years ago it was discovered that genetic variation in the so-called HLA region is the strongest risk factor for developing disease. HLA encodes molecules that are involved in the immune system. However, the specific genes and molecular mechanisms behind the emergence of the disease are not fully established.By using molecular analyses and combining several studies (so-called meta-analysis), including around 14,000 patients with MS and a control group of more than 170,000 healthy individuals, researchers at Karolinska Institutet found that people with the major risk variant HLA-DRB1*15:01 have an increased expression of the HLA-DRB1 gene, thus increasing the risk for the disease. The researchers further discovered a so-called epigenetic regulation of HLA expression as the mechanism mediating this effect.”We show for the first time that epigenetic mechanisms can cause the disease. In addition, we can connect this mechanism to the genetic variant with the strongest risk for developing MS,” says Maja Jagodic, researcher at the Department of Clinical Neuroscience at Karolinska Institutet and one of the authors of the article.The researchers also discovered a new HLA gene variant, rs9267649, which reduces the risk of developing MS. This protective variant decreases the HLA-DRB1 gene expression – through the same epigenetic regulation mechanism – thus reducing the risk for MS. The results open new avenues for potential alternative treatments based on specific epigenetic modulation, i.e. to prevent gene expression artificially. This gives hope for people with MS, as well as other autoimmune diseases.”Almost all autoimmune diseases are associated with HLA,” says Lara Kular, co-author and researcher at the same department.last_img read more

Read More »

European scientists ask governments to boost basic research

first_img Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The economies of Germany and Greece may have little in common. But scientists in those two countries—and across Europe—believe that their national science systems are facing similar assaults from what they view as wrong-headed government policies.In an open letter published Wednesday, prominent science policy advocates from Spain, Italy, Greece, Portugal, France, Germany, and the United Kingdom deplore “the systematic destruction of national R&D infrastructures.” The nine authors highlight what they describe as “drastic” budget and hiring cuts at research institutions and universities in an increasing number of countries, a funding bias toward well-established groups, and an increasing emphasis on applied research.The situation is especially dire in the countries most shaken by the economic crisis, according to Amaya Moro-Martin, an astrophysicist at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Maryland, who summarized the letter in a Nature commentary. Since 2009, the “Spanish civil R&D budget has dropped by 40%, resulting in a reduction of 40% in grants and 30% in human resources programs,” she writes in an e-mail to ScienceInsider. During that same time frame, Italy has cut its higher education budget by 20%, and the number of permanent positions open to recruitment is down by 90%, says Francesco Sylos Labini, a physicist at the Enrico Fermi Center in Rome. Since last year, there has been virtually no money for basic research grants in Italy, he adds. In Greece, the budget of research centers and universities has been cut by at least 50%, and there’s a freeze on new hiring, notes Varvara Trachana, a cell biologist at the University of Thessaly in Greece. Many of the funding and hiring cuts in the southern countries have been done under European pressure to reduce their national deficits, the letter notes. Even in Germany, which has met the European target of spending 3% of its gross domestic product on research, the percentage of scientists working on fixed-term contracts rather than holding permanent positions has risen to as high as 80% at some institutions following the introduction of a new science employment act in 2007.In response to the letter, European science officials say that austerity within individual countries has been partially offset by spending increases at the E.U. level. “This substantially increased support to ambitious projects, whose content is decided exclusively by researchers, must be seen as part of the solution and not part of the problem,” writes the president of the European Research Council (ERC), Jean-Pierre Bourguignon, in an e-mail to ScienceInsider. Bourguignon cites the growth in the E.U. research budget from €55 billion for the 2007 to 2013 period to €80 billion for 2014 to 2020, with more than €13 billion going to ERC. At the same time, he acknowledges that “it is indeed true that some of the austerity measures taken in some countries have severely affected the research sector.”Nearly 5000 scientists have signed the letter, which also warns of a brain drain “from the South to the North and from Europe to beyond.” One positive step that national governments could take to stop that flow, Moro-Martin says, would be to eliminate a country’s investment in public R&D from a calculation of its national deficit. Another accounting change could allow a country that increases its national budget for R&D to proportionately decrease its contribution to European funding schemes. Structural funds could also be used to curb the brain drain, she adds. The open letter is part of a broader movement that includes a 3-week cycling tour around France and a series of meetings at major Italian universities. EuroScientist has launched a blog to promote pan-European discussions. The protest is expected to culminate next week with a march in Paris, a protest in Madrid, and a press conference in Rome.“We are now at the critical point,” Sylos Labini says. “If there will not be a real effort from … the government to change … direction, the [Italian public science] system … will not last for long,” he predicts.*Clarification, 10 October, 4:41 p.m.: This story has been changed to make clear that the European directive on reducing national deficits did not specifically address public employment.center_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

Read More »

Titans dunes took tens of thousands of years to form

first_imgMassive dunes, some of them 100 meters tall and a kilometer or more wide at their base, cover about one-eighth of Titan’s surface. And they take an exceptionally long time to form, according to a new study. Using radar data gleaned by the Cassini probe when it occasionally swooped past Saturn’s haze-shrouded moon, researchers mapped the orientation of about 10,000 crests of linear dunes in Titan’s four largest dune fields. (The dunes, artist’s depiction shown, are likely made of tiny sand-sized particles of frozen hydrocarbons produced by light-driven chemical reactions within the dense orange clouds that swaddle the moon.) Single dunes in those fields, like frozen waves, often stretch unbroken for dozens of kilometers. The new analysis also spotted, for the first time, areas where dunes weren’t so sharply defined. In many of those regions, smaller features superimposed on the larger dunes had been sculpted by winds that blew, on average, at a 23° angle from those that had formed the older features. Computer simulations suggest that it would take about 3000 Saturn years (or 88,200 Earth years) to shift Titan’s dunes to the extent seen in the images, the researchers report online today in Nature Geoscience. That interval is far longer than any daily or seasonal cycles in weather the satellite might experience, the researchers say. Therefore, they contend, the shifts in winds must result from long-term climate cycles associated with variations in Saturn’s orbit. A similar phenomenon has taken place on Earth, the researchers note: The overall patterns in many large dune fields in the southwestern Sahara and the southwestern United States, shaped by the winds that blew during the most recent ice age more than 10,000 years ago, remain largely unaffected by modern winds that now blow in a different direction.last_img read more

Read More »

Want a high test score Take it early

first_imgStandardized tests. The name says it all: If your scores are lower than your peers, you’re probably below par. But many factors go into a test score, from scholastic aptitude and knowledge to growing up in poverty or affluence. Now, you can add one more item to that list: what time the test is taken. Researchers analyzed the test results of 2 million Danish school children between the ages of 8 and 15 to see whether the time of day they took their nation’s comprehensive national test had any effect on performance. Because the test-taking schedule was determined by the availability of computers and class schedule, the timing was essentially random for the students. And the effect was clear. The later in the day, the worse the performance on average, amounting to a nearly 1% drop in scores per hour, the team reports today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. But there’s some good news. Students tested after a half-hour recess got a 1.7% bump. So if you have to test them in the afternoon, at least give the kids a break.last_img read more

Read More »

How farming changed the dog

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Farming didn’t just revolutionize human society—it transformed the genome of our oldest friend, the dog. A new study reveals that by 7000 years ago, our canine companions were eating so much wheat and millet they made extra copies of starch-digesting genes to help them cope. And this adaptation is what allowed them to stay by our sides, even as our world changed.The genetic evolution in dogs parallels what others have found in humans, says Peter Savolainen, an evolutionary geneticist at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, who was not involved with the work. “With farming we started to eat starch, and both we and dogs had to adapt to this change.”Some of the first insights into how farming changed the canine genome came 3 years ago. That’s when evolutionary geneticist Erik Axelsson of Uppsala University in Sweden and his colleagues discovered that dogs have four to 30 copies of a gene—Amy2B—that helps digest starch, whereas wolves typically only have two. Morgane Ollivier wanted to know just when that genetic change happened. A paleogeneticist at Ecole Normale Supéieure de Lyon in France, she teamed up with Axelsson and others, who extracted ancient DNA from the bones and teeth of 13 wolf and dog specimens collected from archaeological sites throughout Eurasia. Four of the ancient dogs—from a 7000-year-old site in Romania and 5000-year-old sites in Turkmenistan and France—had more than eight copies of Amy2B, Ollivier and her colleagues report today in Royal Society Open Science. They do not yet know how many copies ancient wolves had.center_img Because these samples predate the emergence of dog breeds, believed to be within the past couple of centuries, the findings rule out a modern origin for the increase in copy number, says Laurent Frantz, an evolutionary geneticist at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom who was not involved with the work. Adds Ollivier: “This [expansion] probably constituted an important advantage for dogs feeding on human leftovers,” as they hung around human settlements, perhaps serving as guard dogs.Dogs were likely domesticated more than 15,000 years ago, and as companions to hunter-gatherers, were likely eating mostly meat. Being able to survive on whatever humans discarded likely enabled dogs to become widespread as people migrated across the globe, says Robert Wayne, an evolutionary biologist at the University of California, Los Angeles, who was not involved with the study.In humans, the number of copies of this starch gene increased just as it did in dogs during the same time period, Ollivier says. She suggests there may be similar parallels in the evolution of metabolism, immunity, and brain processes in both species.A 2016 survey of various types of dogs from around the world—as well as golden jackals, coyotes, and wolves—supports the new work. It found that almost all the wolves, jackals, and coyotes had just two copies of Amy2B. So did Siberian huskies and dingoes, both of which lived with people who, until recently, hunted or fished for most of their food. The rest of the dogs studied had many more copies of the gene. Farming led to a fivefold increase in the number of starch-digesting genes in these dogs, Axelsson, Savolainen, and their colleagues reported in July in Heredity.Together, says Savolainen, the two studies “give a coherent picture” of man’s influence on man’s oldest friend. *Correction, 9 November, 11:26 a.m.: This story has been modified to reflect the correct gender of Ollivier and the correct terminology for the starch gene. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

Read More »

Anything faster than a brisk walk on this martian moon could send

first_imgThe findings could pose problems for planned missions to Phobos. Several Russian missions have already failed to reach the moon, though one attained martian orbit in the late 1980s before contact was lost. A Japanese landing mission slated for the early 2020s will involve observing the moon and extracting samples.The authors say traveling on the moon will have to happen in slow motion in some places in order to keep contact with the surface. Meanwhile, anything driving on the surface or hovering nearby may need autonomous navigation and control systems to adapt to the wonky spin rate and Phobos’s gravity, to avoid being lost in space. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) University of Arizona/JPL-Caltech/NASA Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Anything faster than a brisk walk on this martian moon could send you spinning off into space By Joshua Rapp LearnNov. 15, 2018 , 3:25 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Walk, don’t run, on the martian moon Phobos. A new study finds that traveling faster than about 5 kilometers per hour on some regions of the Red Planet’s largest satellite could shoot you straight off into space.Phobos (pictured) is an odd duck among our solar system’s moons. It’s tiny (a fraction of a percent the size of our own moon) and is shaped like a potato; that weird shape draws gravity to different places, depending on where you are.All these features make Phobos a challenge to travel on, researchers report in Advances in Space Research. In some places, moving any faster than 5 kilometers per hour would be enough to free you from the moon’s meager gravitational pull, sending you off into space where you’d likely be captured by Mars’s gravity and end up orbiting the Red Planet. The fastest you could travel anywhere on Phobos would be about 36 kilometers per hour, or a little faster than a golf cart, the team finds.last_img read more

Read More »

Fort Defiance family sentenced to prison for medical transport fraud

first_imgFort Defiance family sentenced to prison for medical transport fraud October 11, 2017 Late last month, U.S. District Judge Steven Logan sentenced Vestah Tikium to 33 months in federal prison, followed by three years of supervised release. Tikium’s son, Terdell Dawes, was sentenced to 24 months in federal prison,Subscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adlast_img

Read More »

Eyeing OBC cadreUP unit chief is a Kurmi

first_img Was duped into joining BJP-backed film outfit, says actor Madhabi Mukhopadhyay BJP, BJP party chief, Mangal Prabhat Lodha, Chandrakant Patil, Swatantra Dev Singh, Uttar pradesh elections, Maharashtra elections, Indian Express news Swatantra Dev Singh is from MirzapurWith an eye on consolidating its base among other backward classes (OBCs), the BJP on Tuesday appointed Swatantra Dev Singh as its new Uttar Pradesh chief. Advertising Uttarakhand legislator Pranav Singh expelled from BJP for six years over video with guns Written by Maulshree Seth | Lucknow | Published: July 17, 2019 3:34:37 am BJP will make Maharashtra Congress-mukt, says party state chief Chandrakant Patil Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Post Comment(s) In the recent Lok Sabha elections, he was election in charge of Madhya Paredesh.Since Pandey was inducted into the Narendra Modi Cabinet, the BJP had been looking for a face who can lead the cadre not only in the upcoming bypolls on 12 seats but also the 2022 state polls.He also served as a member of Uttar Pradesh Legislative Council from 2004 to “010.“He is the right choice as he is man of the cadre. In 2009, he was in charge of Lal Krishna Advani’s rallies in the state and has served as state general secretary and vice-president of the party in the state,” said a party leader, adding that he will serve as a bridge between the cadre and the government.center_img Jharkhand court drops ‘donate Quran’ condition for bail to Ranchi woman over offensive post Advertising Sources informed Singh was in Varanasi when the party announced the decision on Tuesday. He was expected to arrive in Lucknow late on Tuesday night.The first task before Singh will be to retain 10 of the 12 bypoll seats. Singh is serving as Transport and Protocol Minister of State (Independent) in the Yogi Adityanath Cabinet. He will replace Mahendra Nath Pandey, who was named Union Minister for Skill Development and Entrepreneurship after the recent Lok Sabha polls. Party’s national president Amit Shah announced the name.A Kurmi (OBC), Singh belongs to Mirzapur in eastern UP with a strong RSS and BJP background.Singh started his political career with student wing Akhil Bharitya Vidhyarthi Parishad, an affiliate of RSS, in the late 1980s. In past three decades, he has handled significant organisational responsibilities from being state president of the Bhartiya Janata Yuva Morcha in 2001 to in-charge of the membership campaign in 2014 to in-charge of the then prime ministerial candidate Narendra Modi’s rallies in the state in 2014. Singh has been particularly active in Bundelkhand region, especially in Jhansi, since his Yuva Morcha days. Best Of Express Related News After Masood Azhar blacklisting, ICJ verdict in Kulbhushan case isolates Pakistan last_img read more

Read More »

Thousands sign up to storm Nevadas Area 51 to see them aliens

first_img Advertising aliens, area 51, area 51 us, area 51 aliens, aliens in area 51, theories around area 51, unidentified flying objects, UFO, UFOs, aliens on earth, world news, Indian Express The theories around Area 51 garnered more attraction after a man in the 1980s claimed that he had actually seen scientists reverse engineer alien saucers there. (Representational Image)Over 5,00,000 people have signed on to a Facebook event pledging to raid Nevada’s Area 51, a site long believed to be a secret alien holding site, on a mission to finally “see them aliens”. The Facebook event titled ‘Storm Area 51, They Can’t Stop All of Us’ is inviting people from around the world to join a “Naruto run” – a unique style of running based on the Japanese anime series Naruto with arms outstretched backwards and heads forward – into the area. Top House Democrat calls on Nevada lawmaker to resign Train derails near Nevada-Utah line; no injuries reported By Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Updated: July 13, 2019 10:19:49 am This isolated and mysterious area has been the focus of conspiracy theories since decades. Many people think that it is where the US government stores its secrets about aliens and UFOs. However, the area was officially acknowledged as a military site in 2013.The theories around Area 51 garnered more traction after a man in the 1980s claimed that he had actually seen scientists reverse engineer alien saucers there, as per local news.The September event comes weeks after US senators were reported about encounters between the US Navy and an unidentified aircraft, which they presumed to be an unidentified flying object. Trump wins Nevada Republican presidential caucuses Related News The event is set to happen on September 20 from 3 am to 6 am (Pacific Daylight Time).“We will all meet up at the Area 51 Alien Center tourist attraction and coordinate our entry. If we Naruto run, we can move faster than their bullets. Let’s see them aliens,” the Facebook event’s page details read.Area 51, located in Nevada, is a secret US Air Force military installation that is administered by Edwards Air Force Base and is well-guarded by fences, radars, and heavily armed government contractors. 1 Comment(s) Advertisinglast_img read more

Read More »

BJP wont close doors to those wanting to join says Prakash Javadekar

first_img Advertising Government has no plans to remove Rabindranath Tagore from school books: Prakash Javedekar  Related News Prakash Javadekar, Prakash Javadekar bjp, karnataka crisis, goa crisis, goa mlas, karnataka mlas resign, Prakash Javadekar on bjp joining, indian express news “We (the BJP) are not involved in orchestrating defection. But we cannot close our doors to incomers,” Javadekar said. (Express photo by Prem Nath Pandey)Union Minister of Information and Broadcasting Prakash Javadekar on Saturday said that the ruling BJP cannot close its doors to those wanting to join it. Javadekar contended that the exodus from the Congress was on account of a lack of faith and trust in the party’s leadership. “At the moment, the Congress is a party without any leader… People are moving out (of the party) since they do not see any future in the Congress,” Javadekar said.He added that “even those (Congress MLAs) who have submitted their resignations in Karnataka have done so claiming they were tired of the party’s functioning style. On the other hand, there are many who wish to work under Narendra Modi’s leadership. All such people are joining us on their own accord.” Centre sacks Shiv Sena MP Adhalrao as DISHA chief, Prakash Javadekar replaces him Advertising Zero plus zero isn’t a hero: Javedekar on oppn alliance 1 Comment(s) By Express News Service |Mumbai | Published: July 14, 2019 1:26:11 am Javadekar’s remarks come at a time when political crisis continues in Karnataka, where the JD(S)-Congress alliance government is on the brink of collapse with 16 MLAs — 13 of the Congress and three of the JD(S) — resigning from their Assembly membership.The minister , who was in Mumbai on Saturday, ruled out Congress accusations that the BJP was misusing its power to topple the government in the southern state. “We (the BJP) are not involved in orchestrating defection. But we cannot close our doors to incomers,” Javadekar said.Rattled by a mass exodus, the Congress has been falling apart in various states following its debacle in 2019 Lok Sabha elections.last_img read more

Read More »

Knowledge of sex differences in lower urinary tract may help stimulate breakthroughs

first_img How sex differences in urinary microbiome impact susceptibility to UTIs Whether sex differences in native reticuloendothelial system cell populations mediate variations in susceptibility to UTIs The role of sex hormones on lower urinary tract development, physiology and susceptibility to malignancies like cancer Source:https://swhr.org/more-than-just-anatomy-sex-differences-in-the-lower-urinary-tract/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 23 2018The biological differences between women and men go beyond basic anatomy. Researchers must consider sex differences down to the cellular level in order to discover crucial information about the varied development, function, and biology between women and men.A new report written by the Society for Women’s Health Research’s Interdisciplinary Network on Urological Health in Women and published today in the Biology of Sex Differences journal highlights how improving our knowledge about sex differences in cell biology in the female and male lower urinary tract may help stimulate breakthroughs in the diagnosis and management of urinary dysfunction for both women and men.Related StoriesMathematical model helps quantify metastatic cell behaviorExciting study shows how centrioles center the process of cell divisionNew study reveals ‘clutch’ proteins responsible for putting T cell activation ‘into gear’For example, while anatomical differences between the sexes have long been thought to be the reason women experience significantly more urinary tract infections (UTIs) than men, more recent evidence supports the existence of other, non-anatomical contributors to women’s increased vulnerability.The location of the female external urethra and the shorter length of that urethra are typically cited as why women get UTIs up to 30 times more often than men do, with more than half of all women experiencing at least one UTI during their lifetime. However, recent research investigating the role of the reticuloendothelial system, which provides immunity against microbes, suggests that differential expression of immune cells in the bladder may amplify the rate of UTIs in women.”In addition to our basic anatomy, women and men exhibit sex differences at the cellular level that influence both the form and function of the lower urinary tract,” said senior author Margot S. Damaser, PhD, staff and professor at the Cleveland Clinic and senior research scientist at the Cleveland VA Medical Center. “These differences need to be taken into account when treating urinary dysfunction in order to provide optimal treatment for both women and men.”The authors note that the review paper should serve as an overview of the current knowledge regarding sex differences in the lower urinary tract, as well as a catalyst for investigators seeking to contribute to the field.Further investigation of sex differences in lower urinary tract cell types is necessary to better develop our understanding of normal and abnormal function, and specifically, the paper states that more research is needed regarding:last_img read more

Read More »

New genetic pathways associated with severe lung disease identified in extremely premature

first_img Source:https://www.luriechildrens.org/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 25 2018Scientists from Stanley Manne Children’s Research Institute at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago and colleagues identified promising new genetic pathways associated with severe lung disease in extremely premature infants, as well as pathways linked to faster recovery from lung disease in this population. The study is the largest to date to perform whole exome sequencing – or examine all the genes that code for proteins – in relation to respiratory outcomes of prematurity. This method is considered to be an efficient way to establish direct links between genetic changes and disease. Their findings were published in BMC Genetics.”Our results lend further support to the theory that some chronic respiratory problems in premature babies have a genetic basis,” says lead author Aaron Hamvas, MD, Division Head of Neonatology at Lurie Children’s and Professor of Pediatrics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “Some of the genetic pathways we found make sense biologically and warrant further research. Ultimately, we hope that early genetic testing could help us identify infants at high risk for severe lung disease, and reveal the precise genetic cause of their disease, so that we can treat it most effectively. Better understanding of genetic causes of lung disease in these babies will bring us closer to developing more precise treatments.”The study completed whole exome sequencing on 146 extremely premature infants born at less than 29 weeks of gestation, examining genetic variations and pathways in connection to the extremes in respiratory outcomes. The group with the most severe extreme of lung disease required continuous respiratory support up to 36 weeks post menstrual age (PMA). The group with the least affected extreme only required respiratory support for less than two weeks after birth and did not require any respiratory support at 36 weeks PMA.Related StoriesStudy: Treatment of psychosis can be targeted to specific genetic mutationHealthy lifestyle lowers dementia risk despite genetic predispositionStudy: Causes of anorexia are likely metabolic and psychologicalOne of the promising genetic pathways identified by this study relates to the gonadotropin releasing hormone, which is involved in sex differences and reproductive functions. Dr. Hamvas and colleagues found that this pathway is overrepresented in babies with the most severe chronic lung disease.”Our observation that a hormonal pathway is related to more severe lung disease is intriguing because we know that there are sex differences in the risk for chronic lung disease in premature infants, with boys more susceptible to worse outcomes,” says Dr. Hamvas, who also is the Raymond & Hazel Speck Berry Professor in Neonatology. “Could the sex differences we see clinically be the result of genetic changes in this pathway? More studies are needed to answer this question.”Another promising genetic pathway that is overrepresented in preemies with severe lung disease involves genes that encode heart development.”Our discovery that genetic changes in a cardiac pathway are associated with chronic lung disease might explain why so many of these babies go on to develop pulmonary hypertension,” says Dr. Hamvas. “One of our research projects is actively pursuing this connection, trying to understand the direct mechanisms involved.”last_img read more

Read More »

Wishes can help pediatric patients to get better over time

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 13 2018Cimone Stills, 15, has a medical condition that has caused her to have multiple seizures a day for most of her life. Specifically, she has treatment-resistant generalized epilepsy because of a genetic variation. Like many patients with such a serious illness, it affects her daily life and as a result, she was diagnosed with clinical depression. But Cimone’s outlook on life completely changed for the better after her wish of going to Paris. Cimone says that the wish helped provide her perspective and hope. It also helped reduced her number of seizures over time.As a member of the Medical Advisory Council of Make-A-Wish America, Anup Patel, MD, section chief of Neurology at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, anecdotally could attest that wishes like Cimone’s positively affected the patients he saw in the Complex Epilepsy Clinic at Nationwide Children’s. As a clinician, he sought evidence to support his hypothesis that these experiences provided children with progressive, life-threatening, or critical illnesses more than hope – that in fact, they had a clinical benefit.Whatever a child has wished for – a puppy, seeing snow for the first time or to meet their favorite celebrity – a recent study led by Nationwide Children’s demonstrates that experiences, or “wishes,” granted to pediatric patients can actually reduce health care utilization. In the retrospective study published online by Pediatric Research, patients granted a wish were 2.5 times more likely to have fewer unplanned hospital admissions and 1.9 times more likely not to have to use the emergency department. This led to a decline in cost of care even after accounting for the average cost of the wish.”My patients have about a one to three percent chance of ever becoming seizure-free. Not every patient of mine who gets a wish is going to come back seizure-free, but they are going to improve,” said Dr. Patel. “Their quality of life is going to be better and that might have an indirect impact on their seizures. They may have fewer seizures as a result, or be more likely to take their medications. Moreover, we are able to give them something they would not otherwise get: a break from their illness.”Related Stories’Traffic light’ food labels associated with reduction in calories purchased by hospital employeesStudy analyzes high capacity of A. baumannii to persist on various surfacesHave cancer, must travel: Patients left in lurch after hospital closes”My wish that was granted in 1988 changed the way I felt about my illness, and it motivated me to fight even harder, to believe even more that there was a future for me,” said Tiffany Rowe, Make-A-Wish recipient and chair of the Make-A-Wish National Board Alumni Association. “It is fundamentally part of why I am still here today.”The study compared patients who received or did not receive a wish and associated impact on healthcare utilization and costs across two years. From 2011 to 2016, 496 Nationwide Children’s Hospital patients received a wish. These were matched to the same number of a control group based on age, gender, disease category and disease complexity.”Wishes are a nice thing to do for a patient, their family and siblings, but for the first time this study lets us say that a wish is more than just nice,” said Dr. Patel. “A wish is something that potentially can help the health of a child get better over time, impact healthcare utilization and reduce dollars spent on healthcare.”Dr. Patel says larger populations of wish-receiving patients need to be studied to determine if this pilot study can be replicated, and to help researchers understand why wishes have such a positive impact. Source:https://www.nationwidechildrens.org/last_img read more

Read More »

30 million federal grant to accelerate chase for universal influenza vaccine

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)May 2 2019Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center will use a $30 million federal grant–the second-largest the center has ever received–to accelerate the chase for one of medicine’s most elusive goals: a universal influenza vaccine.Public health organizations have long clamored for a flu vaccine that can provide longer-lasting protection to people and be stockpiled beyond a single flu season. Yet despite decades of effort, flu vaccines still must be re-formulated every year, with effectiveness ranging from a modest 60 percent to a dismal 20 percent.As a result, many people lack confidence in the flu vaccine and choose not to receive it. This, in turn, helps to keep flu-related complications among the nation’s top 10 leading causes of death. An estimated 46,000 Americans died in the 2018-19 flu season, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).Now, a $30 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) will fund research based here to dig deeper into how the immune systems of infants and growing children are affected by their first exposures to flu viruses. Gathering the information required will involve asking more than 2,000 sets of mothers and infants from the Cincinnati area and from Mexico City to participate in at least three years of weekly medical testing.”We have to do better. Most other vaccines have effectiveness rates above 90 percent. We need a flu vaccine that reaches those levels,” says Mary Allen Staat, MD, MPH, the principal investigator for the new grant. “To achieve that goal, we need much more data from real people. That’s what our study will seek to generate. Then, the vaccine makers will have the information they need to make a better, longer-lasting vaccine.”A rising sense of urgencyFor many public health leaders, the flu season of 2017-18 was a wake-up call. The vaccine did not work well, and the CDC estimated that 80,000 Americans died from flu-related pneumonias, heart attacks, and organ failures. That was the worst flu death toll in nearly 40 years.In response, a group of senators introduced the Flu Vaccine Act in February 2018 to provide up to $1 billion to the National Institutes of Health to support influenza research grants across five years. The bill did not pass, but was re-introduced earlier this year. In the meantime, Congress has boosted flu vaccine research funding from about $60 million two years ago to more than $140 million for fiscal 2019.The grant to Cincinnati Children’s is one large part of this growing nationwide effort.”We are delighted that the NIAID has recognized the outstanding expertise of Drs. Staat and Morrow and their team by awarding the second-largest grant in Cincinnati Children’s history,” says Margaret Hostetter, MD, Director of the Cincinnati Children’s Research Foundation. “There are many unanswered questions about influenza exposure and protection in mothers and babies. Dr. Staat’s study–coupled with the systems biology expertise of Drs. Paul Spearman, Sing Sing Way, and colleagues at Emory University–promises to unlock the mysteries with an unrivaled combination of epidemiology, global health expertise, and vaccine immunology.”Related StoriesAntibiotics can wipe out early flu resistance, study findsHPV vaccine has led to a dramatic reduction in cervical cancer rates, but Africa is lagging behindComputer-generated flu vaccine enters clinical trials in the USWhat is ‘imprinting’?One reason scientists have struggled to find a universal flu vaccine is that the two major types of flu virus (H and N) come in no less than 28 subtypes.The new Influenza IMPRINT Cohort study will explore the emerging idea that a person’s very first influenza virus exposure impacts the magnitude, durability and breadth of their immune response to all future flu exposures. For example, does a person have better resistance to future flu outbreaks if their first exposure was to a wild virus, or to weakened forms used in vaccines? How much does a person’s future resistance depend on the specific strain of flu they encounter first? Or, if a person’s immune system was primed by one strain, does that make it harder for their bodies to respond well to a vaccine that targets a different strain?”This type of immunological imprinting likely explains much about the wide variation in vaccine effectiveness year-to-year,” Staat says.Better information about how imprinting works could help vaccine researchers determine the ideal mix of flu strains to use in a universal flu vaccine that has the best odds of protecting people years later as other flu strains emerge. Beyond the mix of strains, experts want to figure out the best age for infants to receive their first vaccine, the best vaccine timing during pregnancy for expectant mothers, even the specific best time of year in the US and globally to get the shots.Seeking dedicated volunteersResearch partners in Cincinnati and Mexico City will work with local hospital birthing centers to invite mothers to join the IMPRINT study.Each mother will be asked to respond to texts about their child’s symptoms and provide fresh nasal swabs every week for her child for at least three years. The research teams also will collect blood and other samples to track responses to influenza vaccine and wild influenza virus exposures.Staat says Cincinnati Children’s won this grant in part because it was successful at building a similar cohort of volunteers for a different natural history of infection study called PREVAIL, which also required weekly involvement.Staat knows in person just how much effort the IMPRINT study will ask of its participants, because her family participated in the PREVAIL study. Staat recalls personally delivering samples and bringing her granddaughter to the hospital for testing days.”It was intense, but it became our Saturday routine,” Staat says. “The moms who join IMPRINT are going to be part of something that is going to make a real difference.” Source:https://www.cincinnatichildrens.org/news/release/2019/universal-flu-vaccine-grantlast_img read more

Read More »

FashionBuzz © 2015 | All Rights Reserved Theme by Flythemes