Category: avdygbta

After-school Care

first_imgBy Faith PeppersUniversity of GeorgiaOne spring afternoon, 12-year-old Jack Bazemore decided to stay home alone for a couple of hours to finish his homework while his mother took his younger sister to practice for the school play. Shortly after the pair parted, he heard tornado sirens. “I put the dogs in their crates and covered them with blankets,” he said. “I grabbed my weather radio, my cell phone and some pillows, put on my bicycle helmet and got in the closet under the stairs.” Bazemore drew on the skills he learned in Boy Scouts and acted based on family discussions on what to do in case of a tornado. He proved he was ready to be home alone. How do you know if your child is ready to be home alone or still needs afterschool care? University of Georgia experts say answering that question means knowing your child.“First, the child should really want to be home alone,” said Diane Bales, a UGA Cooperative Extension child development specialist in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences. “Deciding if you allow it should depend on the child’s personality, maturity and many other factors.” Before they’re ready to stay at home alone after school, children need to show that they can take care of themselves, have the judgment to make good decisions and are ready to handle any emergencies or unexpected events that come up, she said.Bales offers this check list as a guide. Answering “yes” to these questions may mean your child is ready to be home alone. Can the child: • Give his address and directions to home?• Repeat and dial the home phone number?• Explain how to handle first aid for cuts and scrapes, burns, nosebleeds, poisonings, bites, choking and eye injuries, and find needed supplies?• Identify two escape routes in case of a fire?• Handle telephone calls or strangers at the door properly?• Reach parents or other responsible adults by phone?• Name two adults to contact in case of an emergency?• Tell parents or child-care providers about daily events without prompting?• Locate safe shelter during a storm?• Name five household rules and identify which ones were followed last week?• Decide what the right thing to do is, without adult input?• Feel safe when alone and fears (such as darkness) or nightmares are minimal when adults aren’t around?Other considerations might be whether the child completes household chores and homework, is responsible and asks for help when needed. Experts generally agree that a structured after-school care program is a better long-term option even if the child is ready to be home alone. Choosing the right program can be difficult. Some schools offer in-school aftercare. Others contract with local day care facilities to provide after-school care. These programs have advantages and disadvantages. “It’s convenient, and parents don’t have to worry about how the child will be transported from school to the program,” Bales said. “Also, children are well-supervised by responsible adults.” Some other advantages include help with homework, time to play with peers, ability to participate in extracurricular activities and access to playgrounds. Many school-age programs also provide care during summers and school holidays to help parents who work.Some disadvantages of in-school care are the added expense for parents, high turnover in staff resulting in less consistency for children and “some programs are so structured that the children don’t get enough time to play and relax,” she said. When choosing an after-school care program, Bales recommends looking for a program that is safe, reliable and developmentally appropriate for your child’s needs, provides plenty of time for play, employs consistent, well-educated adults who understand the development of school-age children and offers appropriate opportunities for children to make some decisions about how they spend their time in the program.Also, confirm the program is certified. “School-age care programs are required to be licensed by Bright from the Start: Georgia Department of Early Care and Learning under the same rules and regulations that license all child care centers,” Bales said. Find the complete licensing rules online at http://decal.ga.gov/documents/attachments/CCLCRulesandRegulations.pdf.(Faith Peppers is a news editor for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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A Hike Beneath the Hemlocks

first_imgA wonderful hike in Georgia’s Chattahoochee National Forest is the Bear Creek & Pinhoti Trails, near the Cohutta Wilderness Area. The trailhead is around 6 miles north of Ellijay, Georgia and follows Bear Creek, then leads to the Mountaintown roadless area. The whole area is a hot spot for mountain biking and hiking, with a great network of trails, including the well-known Pinhoti Trail.Georgia Forest Watch’s executive director, Wayne Jenkins suggested this trail to me and I was lucky enough to spend a day hiking it with him. The trail begins by following a sweet, peaceful stream named (you guessed it) Bear Creek. Large evergreen hemlocks dominate the cove, creating a magical, cool-shaded setting for our afternoon summer hike.After 1.2 miles, the Bear Creek Trail intersects the Pinhoti, leading over a low gap and into the Mountaintown Creek roadless area, then down to Mountaintown Creek. Talk about beautiful! I could feel the tensions of modern life ease as I walked the woodland trails. In total, we hiked about 3.6 miles, but again, this area has a network of trails, so there are many options. Make sure you take a map!While walking in this Hemlock-rich forest, Wayne described the important role of Hemlock trees in our mountain forests – and the looming threat of an exotic insect infestation targeting these trees. The threat is real – the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (HWA) is native to Asia but deadly to our hemlocks – and these devastating insects are creeping down the Appalachians. Many areas in Georgia’s Chattahoochee are already infested, but the Bear Creek area is still unaffected.I learned that Hemlocks are not only perhaps the most aesthetically-pleasing evergreen tree in the region, but play a tremendous ecological role in the Southern Appalachians, cooling streams, sheltering bird and mammal species, moderating winter ground temperatures, and holding steep stream banks in place. Hemlocks are an irreplaceable and majestic part of our mountain forests – often hundreds of years old – and are a critical component for maintaining the cool stream temperatures necessary for trout and native fish species.When first discovered in Georgia a plan was needed for study and treatment of the impacts of the invasive Adelgid. Georgia ForestWatch stepped up and helped the Forest Service craft a plan and identify critical areas of immediate concern. Particularly, the loss of Hemlock trees would affect campgrounds and popular recreation areas by turning cool, forested areas into warmer openings with tree clogged streams.One approach to dealing with the HWA is introduction of several beetle species that feed exclusively on the adelgids. There are other methods to treat the Hemlocks, but due to the cost and scale of the problem these are not viable across the forest. So the idea, though experimental, is to introduce the beetles to the infested areas and hope they breed, populate, and eventually control the Adelgid population before the demise of the Hemlocks.Georgia ForestWatch, the University of Georgia and the USDA Forest Service have teamed up with the Georgia Forestry Commission, the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, the Georgia Wildlife Federation, the Georgia Conservancy, and others to organize a fundraising campaign and secured a beetle production facility. Together, the groups are moving forward in fighting this foreign, devastating insect.In the meantime, make sure to get out and enjoy hikes like the Bear Creek Trail. I, for one, was grateful for the shade produced by the Hemlocks on this hot Georgia afternoon hike!To get there: From Ellijay, take GA 76 west about 5 miles to Gates Chapel Road. Follow Gates Chapel road for about 3 ½ miles and turn right on Forest Service road 241. Follow the signs to the Bear Creek Trailhead.last_img read more

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The Importance of a Sunrise

first_imgWhen is the last time you saw the sunrise?For me, it was a week ago on top of Humpback Rocks outside of Charlottesville, Va. It was a Thursday morning, and I thought for sure that I would have the place to myself. During the school year, the parking lot at the trailhead is normally packed with college kids, particularly on the weekend. There’s good reason for it, too. It’s a short, albeit straight uphill, march to a near-360-degree view of the surrounding Blue Ridge. For those who can’t afford the time to spend a day in the mountains, it’s a great hike to get you a little bit of trail time.Unless, of course, you specifically get up before the crack of dawn to see the sunrise. Which takes a few hours. Which is precisely what I wanted.I should probably clarify a little. When I want to see a sunrise, I literally want to see the sun rise. That means I want to see the rosy fingers of dawn and all that jazz emerge from the darkness and creep their way across the horizon until the sun, a golden-red globe of glory, peaks over the furthest mountain range and finally turns night to day. I want to see the stars and a blue sky. I want to see the moon (if it’s out) and the sun.That means, I’m up at 4a.m. and on the trail less than an hour after I drag myself from bed.It sounds a little ridiculous, getting up during the work week three (or so) hours before normal just to see the sun. Even I was questioning my motives as I lugged my camera gear up the mountainside in total darkness. But as soon as those rosy fingers of dawn started to show their color, I knew I’d be in for a treat.That’s why I found it absolutely astounding, and borderline irritating, when two giggly girls showed up to quickly snap a #selfie in front of the vista before turning around to head back, all before the sun had legitimately risen.I heard their high-pitched chatter in the gusting wind long before I saw them, and initially, I was impressed. A Thursday morning in the summertime? These girls looked to be no older than 16, maybe 17. Just old enough to have a license I would presume. They didn’t look like seasoned hikers either, choosing skimpy tank tops, cotton shorts, and flip flops for their hiking attire (I, on the other hand, was wearing my Eddie Bauer pants, a long-sleeved shirt underneath a fleece jacket, and a beanie…in July…and barely warm). The hike is no walk in the park either. As I mentioned earlier, it’s all uphill for about a mile, gaining close to 800′ in elevation. Even for an avid hiker, you have to take a break or two just to give your straining calves a rest.So in my mind, if I wake up that early to hike a trail that is not all that enjoyable to see a sunrise over one of the most picturesque overlooks of the Shenandoah Valley, you can be damn well certain I’ll be hanging out for the entire show.brpPerhaps it was their poor choice in clothing. Perhaps it was because they were more concerned with the documentation of such an adventure, the proof that “we did it” that they were out for. But perhaps, as sad as it sounds, they didn’t know what a sunrise looked like.I’m not one to judge how other people choose to spend their time, especially in the mountains. The outdoors do different things for different people, and everyone’s dose of mountain time varies. Some need only to park their car at an overlook and watch the sun rise from behind their windshield. Others prefer to hike in a few miles the day before, camp out, and let the sun wake them. I fall somewhere in between, but regardless of my approach, I make sure I’m there to catch those brief moments where blazing sun breaks horizon line in an almost fantastical, other-worldly way.It’s a comfort, to me at any rate, to know that the sun rises and sets every day. It never changes. It’s always there. No matter what craziness occurs in our day-to-day lives, we can always rely on night turning to day. Seeing the sun crest those mountaintops resets my internal clock. It makes me get up earlier, rejuvenates my creative energy (which can oftentimes fizzle out and all but die), and makes me feel accomplished before most people have even checked their emails.That’s why when I saw the girls walk away from the overlook (as beautiful as it was already), I couldn’t help but think, you’re missing the point.For me, the point of catching a sunrise extends far beyond those three things I mentioned above. More importantly, it makes me sit still. For more than 30 minutes. And not behind a computer. That’s the beauty of it too, because there is nothing else in this world that I need to or should be doing at that early of an hour. Except, of course, that which I am doing: watching the sun rise (and taking pictures, no doubt — see selfie below).brp-3I’m restless by nature, so sitting still is a definite challenge but, once overcome, does wonders for my mood. It’s one of the few times in my life where I simply allow myself to be and observe and reflect and think. About anything and everything. And I need that in my life, that time to quite literally do nothing.Should I let go of my disappointment and appreciate the fact that those two girls got up during their summer vacation before 8a.m. to hike two miles in near-darkness? Or should I be concerned that they didn’t stay longer, that perhaps they thought they had accomplished their goal of seeing a sunrise (assuming that was their goal at all)?Perhaps I ought to get up at 4a.m. tomorrow to hike to another overlook and sit and ponder these thoughts for a few hours. Maybe then I will know how to feel.Until then, what do you think? Is there merit in watching the sun rise?last_img read more

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Commission gets grievance survey

first_imgCommission gets grievance survey Commission gets grievance survey Mark D. Killian Managing Editor and Gary Blankenship Senior Editor The Bar’s Special Commission on Lawyer Regulation has received the results of wide-ranging surveys on the Bar’s grievance process, and will be discussing those results at an upcoming meeting.Chair Hank Coxe told the Board of Governors at its May 28 meeting that the surveys encompassed those who have filed complaints, respondents, attorneys representing respondents, grievance committee members, Bar counsel, and referees.The commission will examine those reports in detail when it meets at the annual convention later this month, Coxe said. He added the committee will also hear from Supreme Court Justice Raoul Cantero.The commission has also added three new members, Coxe reported. They are Vivian Hobbs and Solomon Badger, both public members of the Board of Governors, and Roddie Bailey, chair of the Bar’s Citizens Forum.Coxe said the commission’s goal is to review the grievance program, which costs about $10 million annually and determine “how are we spending this money, are we going about it right, and what are we getting for this money.” Survey Results A hallmark of the commission’s work has been a relentless seeking of input from all possible sources. While the panel has received hundreds of written comments, it also sent out thousands of surveys from those who have been involved in the grievance process, including complainants, respondents, grievance committee members, attorneys on all sides, and referees.The results of that polling shows that while almost all Bar grievance committee members, referees, and Bar counsel – and a vast majority of respondents and their lawyers – feel the Bar grievance process is fair, more than three-quarters of those who bring the complaints against their lawyer say the proceedings are not fair to all concerned.The contrast between lawyers and judges involved in a grievance case and the citizens who bring the complaints was also evident when asked how they felt about the appropriateness of the decision reached on their most recent grievance case. While 97 percent of grievance committee members, 87 percent of respondents, and 83 percent of referees report satisfaction with the decision, 82 percent of complainants report they were unsatisfied with the appropriateness of the decision, saying the punishment was not tough enough.In all, 2,949 people returned the surveys sent to respondents, complainants, grievance committee members, referees, Bar counsel, and lawyers for the respondents. Respondents A majority of 1,423 respondents who returned the survey said they understood how the grievance process works procedurally (79 percent); understood what to expect during the investigation (78 percent); and did not have to ask anyone to explain the grievance process (71 percent). Those who did ask for explanations regarding the process generally asked Bar counsel or another lawyer. Several respondents who asked and were not pleased with the responses received from Bar counsel mainly said the counsel’s answers were “evasive and vague.” Few respondents used ACAP, but 86 percent of those who did found it useful.A large majority of respondents (87 percent) reported they were satisfied with the appropriateness of the decision on their most recently resolved case, feel the decision was generally fair (90 percent), and understood why the case was disposed as it was (95 percent). Additionally, 64 percent received status information during the process from Bar counsel, and 60 percent received status information from a grievance committee. Less than 10 percent provided testimony in their most recent case.The survey found 72 percent of respondents believe the proceedings were fair to all concerned, while 9 percent said that they were somewhat fair, and 19 percent believe they were not fair. Three categories emerged from those respondents who believe their proceedings were only somewhat fair or unfair: The need to better screen or eliminate frivolous complaints; problems with investigation/enforcement; and problems with a process that seems unfair to respondents.Overall, the survey found 80 percent of respondents believe an attorney has a full and fair opportunity to defend against a complaint. For the one-fifth of respondents who believe that an attorney does have not a full and fair opportunity, they mainly cite problems with a process that seems unfair to respondents; problems with investigation and enforcement; and problems created by the filing of frivolous complaints, the survey said. Over two-thirds – or 70 percent – of respondents are satisfied with the Bar’s disciplinary procedure system; 21 percent are unsatisfied; and 9 percent are neutral.Those who are unsatisfied cite problems stemming from the filing of frivolous complaints; problems with investigation/enforcement; and problems with a process that seems unfair to respondents. Complainants Fifty-nine percent of the 907 complainants who returned the survey said they understood how the grievance process works procedurally, and 52 percent understood what to expect during the investigation. About half (51 percent) asked someone to explain the grievance process. Those complainants who did ask for explanations generally brought their questions to Bar counsel, with a significant amount also asking their lawyer or a grievance committee member. The survey found 58 percent of complainants who asked for explanations were not pleased with the responses received and cited reasons such as the information received was vague; the person they spoke with demonstrated a lack of interest or displayed an unprofessional attitude; and the message was never returned.Almost two-fifths of complainants used ACAP, and 75 percent of those who did found it useful.A large majority of complainants (82 percent), however, were unsatisfied with the appropriateness of the decision on their most recent case; felt the decision was not tough enough on the attorney (81 percent); and did not understand why the case was disposed as it was (70 percent).The survey also found 77 percent of complainants believe the proceedings were not fair to all concerned, while 12 percent believe they were somewhat fair, and only 11 percent believe they were fair.For those complainants who believe the system is not fair or only somewhat fair, the frequently mentioned reasons include: Proceedings seemed biased in favor of attorneys; investigations were not thorough; cases were dismissed at an early level; an attorney misrepresented the truth in a case; communication was lacking; and there was general disagreement with the final decision.The survey found 81 percent of complainants are unsatisfied with the appropriateness of the result; 75 percent with the thoroughness of the investigation; 67 percent with the quality of the written decision; 59 percent with the promptness in reaching a decision; 59 percent with the promptness in obtaining a hearing date; 56 percent with the accuracy of information provided; and 52 percent with the promptness in responding to information requests.In all, the survey found 74 percent of complainants are unsatisfied with the Bar’s disciplinary procedure system, and only 19 percent reported they were satisfied – the rest were neutral. Those who are unsatisfied cite problems with investigation/enforcement; a process that seems unfair to complainants; and communication concerns. Grievance Committees The survey found 97 percent of 344 grievance committee members polled were satisfied with the appropriateness of the decision reached on their most recently resolved case, and 93 percent felt that the decision was generally fair. A vast majority of grievance committee members (97 percent) also believe the proceedings were fair to all concerned.The survey also found that 66 percent of grievance committees hold live hearings. Most frequently listed reasons for holding live hearings are: to address doubt in a case; to determine probable cause; at the request of a respondent or complainant; and to assess the credibility of witnesses. Fifty-seven percent of grievance committees dispose of some cases by review of the record only (paper reviews), and 85 percent of grievance committee members are satisfied that paper reviews allow a respondent to fairly defend against the allegations of a complaint. The survey also said 87 percent of grievance committee members are also satisfied that paper reviews allow complainants to adequately articulate the allegations of the complaint.Almost all (96 percent) grievance committee members believe an attorney has a full and fair opportunity to defend against a complaint.“For the very few grievance committee members who do not believe that an attorney has a full and fair opportunity, they mainly cite the need for more live hearings where the complainant and respondent have the right to appear,” the survey said.Ninety-four percent of grievance committee members are satisfied with the disciplinary procedure system of The Florida Bar; 4 percent are unsatisfied; and 2 percent are neutral.“Those few who are unsatisfied cite time delay problems within the system and a system that seems to be too lenient on respondents,” the survey said. Respondent’s Counsel The survey found 72 percent of 80 respondents’ counsel who completed the survey are satisfied with the appropriateness of the decision reached on their most recently resolved case; 79 percent feel the decision was generally fair; and 91 percent understand why the case was disposed as it was.Fifty-five percent of respondent’s counsel believe the proceedings were fair to all concerned, while 18 percent said they were somewhat fair, and 27 percent believe they were not fair, according to the survey.Some reasons mentioned for the process being only somewhat fair or not fair include “a feeling that there is a presumption of guilt on a respondent; the process being political; and a belief that there is an underlying attitude to discipline,” the survey said.The survey also found 77 percent of respondents’ counsel are satisfied with the accuracy of information provided; 72 percent with the promptness in responding to information requests; 64 percent with the appropriateness of the result; 64 percent with the simplicity of procedure; 64 percent with the quality of the written decision; 64 percent with the simplicity of forms utilized; 58 percent with the promptness in reaching a decision; 56 percent with the promptness in obtaining a hearing date; and 56 percent with the thoroughness of the investigation.Seventy-one percent of respondent’s counsel believe an attorney has a full and fair opportunity to defend against a complaint, the survey found.“For those respondents’ counsel who believe that an attorney does not have a full and fair opportunity, they mainly cite: the need for more probable cause hearings and less reliance on paper reviews; an expedited process; and a recourse for frivolous complaints filed against attorneys,” the survey said.Sixty-six percent of respondents’ counsel are satisfied with the disciplinary procedure system, while 24 percent are unsatisfied and 10 percent are neutral. Those who are unsatisfied cite a need for improved screening on frivolous complaints; and more live hearings, with less reliance on paper hearings, the survey said. Judicial Referees Of the 167 referees who returned the survey, 83 percent were satisfied with the appropriateness of the decision reached on their most recently resolved case and 91 percent felt that the decision was generally fair. Ninety-six percent of referees believe that the proceedings were fair to all concerned.The vast majority of referees (98 percent) said an attorney has a full and fair opportunity to defend against a complaint, and 90 percent are satisfied with the disciplinary procedure system.“Those few who are unsatisfied cite time delay problems within the system and the system/sanctions being too lenient on attorneys,” the survey said. Bar Counsel The survey found that 75 percent of Bar counsel believe the proceedings were fair to all concerned, while 21 percent believe they were somewhat fair, and 4 percent believe they were not fair. Twenty-eight Bar lawyers returned the survey.Fifty-six percent of Bar counsel believe the overall grievance process is just right, while 44 percent believe it is too slow. No Bar counsel believes the system is too rushed, the survey said. For those counsel who believe the system is too slow, 64 percent list the grievance committee process and 64 percent cite the Florida Supreme Court as key time problem areas. Additionally, 50 percent list the initial investigation level and 27 percent list the trial process. Suggestions to improve the time process include increasing Bar counsel or staff; stricter adherence to time frames; reducing case loads; and having a page limit for filed complaints.Ninety-two percent of Bar counsel are satisfied with the disciplinary procedure system; 4 percent are unsatisfied; and 4 percent are neutral.“Comments made toward improving the quality of the Bar’s grievance system include: a need for increased salaries/benefits for Bar counsel; increased counsel and support staff; and a decreased case load,” the survey said. June 15, 2004 Senior Editor Regular Newslast_img read more

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Sex Offender Admits to Using Hidden Camera

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Robert LiguoriA registered sex offender has admitted using a hidden camera to film female models changing in a dressing room during a Hamptons swimsuit fashion show last summer.Robert Liguori pleaded guilty Friday at Suffolk County court to unlawful surveillance, a felony. The 52-year-old Mastic Beach man had been arrested in October.Prosecutors said Liguori placed a camera on a shelf pointed at the makeshift dressing area during a Southampton swimsuit show July 12. An intern later found the camera.Liguori has been a sex offender since his 2000 conviction for child pornography.Judge Barbara Kahn will sentence Liguori on May 8.last_img read more

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Creatures great and small

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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Arsenal fans demand return of Marc Overmars after Ajax stun Juventus in Champions League

first_imgAjax stunned Juventus to reach the Champions League semi finals for the first time since 1997 (Picture: Getty)Arsenal fans are demanding the return of Marc Overmars as technical director after Ajax stunned Juventus to reach their first Champions League semi final since 1997.Cristiano Ronaldo’s bullet header in the 28th minute put the Serie A heavyweights in control of their quarter final tie but Ajax’s supremely talented young side, which dethroned Real Madrid in the previous round, rallied and equalised before half time through Donny van de Beek.Ajax dominated the second period and deservedly went in front through Matthijs de Ligt, whose goal ensured a place in the last four where they will face either Tottenham or Manchester City.AdvertisementAdvertisementOvermars is currently the director of football at Ajax and has been credited with playing a major role in the assembly of a precocious side which contains the likes of Barcelona-bound Frenkie de Jong and reported Arsenal transfer target David Neres.ADVERTISEMENT Comment Advertisement Read More PLAY Metro Sport ReporterWednesday 17 Apr 2019 9:07 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link717Shares Go on Ajax. Sensational season so far from them. Hey Overmars let @Arsenal sign Ziyech, Neres and Van De Beek please 😊— Vas Tsouvalas (@TreeHeaddd) April 16, 2019 About Connatix V67539 Manchester United captain Harry Maguire Full Screen SPONSORED Rio Ferdinand tells Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop struggling Marc Overmars won the double during his playing days with Arsenal (Picture: Getty) 1 min. story / by Metro Advertisement Top articles Skip Read More Skip Ad Visit Advertiser website GO TO PAGE Read More Arsenal fans demand return of Marc Overmars after Ajax stun Juventus in Champions League Coming Next Read More More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal Video Settings The former Arsenal double winner has been linked with a return to north London in a similar capacity following the sudden exit of the club’s head of recruitment Sven Mislintat in February and Gooners certainly believe he is the perfect candidate to oversee their transfer strategy this summer… 1/1 Read Morelast_img read more

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Hiretech invests in decommissioning sector

first_imgHiretech Limited has taken delivery of newly built subsea shears and hydraulic grabs as part of a recent GBP 600k investment in decommissioning equipment. Hiretech, which offers equipment rental and personnel supply to the energy and marine industries, has not been immune to the effects of Covid-19 and the recent oil price volatility, but believes the business environment has now stabilised. Hiretech’s Decommissioning and Subsea Business Development manager, Duncan Duthie, said: “We were keen to pinpoint the correct target for our investment, and collaborated with our clients and the manufacturer to go back to first principles for the subsea shears. We now have shears specifically designed for water depths of up to 10,000 ft with performance, ease of operation and maintenance a priority.”center_img Andy Buchan, CEO, said, “Talking to our peers and clients, it is apparent that activity drops through the worst months of the pandemic of up to 70% from last year were not uncommon, although there are definitely encouraging signs of a bump off the bottom at the moment. Like other businesses, we have had to resize, refocus and reinvigorate our team to meet the new challenges we face. We see tremendous opportunities for SMEs in the new world.”last_img read more

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Coaches Corner

first_imgCoaches Corner will return a week from today!  We will be broadcasting every Monday (excluding holidays) from August 14 until the middle of April.  Tune in next Monday at 6 p.m. on WRBI for our first show coming from Ison’s Family Pizza!On our first show we will be talking to Evan Ulery (Batesville football), Kevin Ferneding (OA football), Ryan Langferman (Milan football), Ken Getz (OA soccer), and BHS basketball alumni Wes McKinney!  Please tune in to hear the latest local sports news.last_img read more

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Two Greensburg residents arrested during multi-agency operation

first_imgElizabethtown, In. — Two Greensburg residents are among four people arrested in Elizabethtown following a multi-agency operation.Indiana State Police All Crimes Policing Unit, Jennings County Sheriff’s Department, Bartholomew County Sheriff’s Department, Columbus police and officers from the Joint Narcotics Enforcement Task Force served a search warrant in the 9500 block of North County Road 700 West Thursday and found methamphetamine, precursors and paraphernalia.Christopher Parrot, 41, Nicole Schlapp, 38, both of Greensburg, Nicholas Johnson, 39, of Elizabethtown, and Kelly Williams, 29, of Columbus all face multiple charges.The investigation was initiated by the Indiana State Police.last_img read more

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