Category: tiwmdhui

Yemeni security official found dead, day after abduction

first_imgSANAA, Yemen (AP) — Yemeni officials say a senior security official was found dead in the southern port city of Aden, just a day after his abduction. The officials say Brig. Ibrahim Harad was abducted late on Tuesday in front of his house in an Aden district. His body was found in the same district on Wednesday with multiple bullet wounds. No group has so far claimed responsibility for Harad’s abduction and death. Yemen has been convulsed by civil war since 2014, with Iran-backed Houthi rebels on one side and the internationally recognized government, which is supported by a Saudi-led coalition, on the other.last_img read more

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Bluegrass Mass’ impresses audience at Saint Mary’s

first_imgMonroe Crossings Band and the South Bend Chamber Singers performed a unique mass at Saint Mary’s College on Sunday, merging voices, strings and the twang of bluegrass. The groups performed composer Carol Barnett’s “The World Beloved: A Bluegrass Mass” in O’Laughlin Auditorium as part of the Shaheen/Duggan Performing Arts Series. “‘A Bluegrass Mass’ combines the text of a traditional Catholic Mass, contemporary choral music, poetry and bluegrass instruments into a unique musical experience,” Barnett said in a College press release. “To bring the solemnity of the classical choir-based Mass together with the down home sparkle of bluegrass — now there’s an assignment for a composer.” Monroe Crossing began the night by performing with the South Bend Chamber Children’s Choir. Dressed in plaid shirts, jeans and suspenders, the children sang “Oh! Susanna”, “The Merry, Merry Heart” and “Cripple Creek”. “We’re bluegrass with a Scandinavian attitude,” Matt Thompson, mandolin, fiddle and vocalist for the Minnesota-based group, said. According to Nancy Menk, professor of music at Saint Mary’s College ,in a College press release, Monroe Crossings was the best band for the job. “‘A Bluegrass Mass’ is an outstanding musical piece,” Menk said. “It is tough and the rhythm is complicated. Monroe Crossing played the premiere of this unique Mass; it was written for them. The group knows the piece better than anyone. It was in our best interest to bring them here.” Despite being the best band for the job, Thompson confessed that he and his fellow band members actually forget about the performance after they agreed to it. “[We] completely forgot about it,” he said. “A year and a half later, [Barnett] came over and dropped this big stack of music in front of us.” This was an unusual encounter, Thompson said. “Bluegrass players are used to playing by ear, so most people in bluegrass don’t read music,” he said, “And some people in the band don’t even read!” After a version was recorded for the band to orally hear their parts, “A Bluegrass Mass” was born, and the band will perform it 10 times this year alone, Thompson said.last_img read more

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Heather Graham Exits Neil LaBute’s The Money Shot

first_img View Comments The Money Shot No word yet on will replace Graham. The Money Shot cast also includes Frederick Weller, Gia Crovatin and Callie Thorne. Heather Graham has left the off-Broadway production of The Money Shot, according to Deadline. The film star has reportedly departed the Neil LaBute play to focus on her film Half Magic, which she will write, direct and star in. The MCC Theater production is scheduled to begin performances at the Lucille Lortel Theatre on September 4, where it will run through October 12. Opening night is set for September 22. Related Shows The Money Shot, directed by Terry Kinney, tells the story of Karen and Steve, two glamorous movie stars with one thing in common: desperation. The night before filming a big scene for the latest film by a hot shot European director, the two meet with their respective partners to make an important decision: how far will they let themselves go to keep from slipping further down the Hollywood food chain? Show Closed This production ended its run on Oct. 19, 2014last_img read more

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New Nerve and Muscle Interfaces Aid Wounded Warrior Amputees

first_img DARPA’s current efforts with peripheral interfaces are scheduled to continue up to 2016. Researchers at Case Western Reserve University used a flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) to demonstrate direct sensory feedback. By interfacing with residual nerves in the patient’s partial limb, some sense of touch by the fingers is restored, thus making some tasks easier. Other existing prosthetic limb control systems rely solely on visual feedback. Unlike visual feedback, direct sensory feedback allows patients to move a hand without keeping their eyes on it—enabling simple tasks, like rummaging through a bag for small items, not possible with today’s prosthetics. The FINE is one of many different types of nerve interfaces developed under the RE-NET program. “Although the current generation of brain, or cortical, interfaces have been used to control many degrees of freedom in an advanced prosthesis, researchers are still working on improving their long-term viability and performance,” said Jack Judy, DARPA program manager. “The novel peripheral interfaces developed under RE-NET are approaching the level of control demonstrated by cortical interfaces and have better biotic and abiotic performance and reliability. Because implanting them is a lower risk and less invasive procedure, peripheral interfaces offer greater potential than penetrating cortical electrodes for near-term treatment of amputees. RE-NET program advances are already being made available to injured war fighters in clinical settings.” By Dialogo June 05, 2013 A team of researchers at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago demonstrated a type of peripheral interface called targeted muscle re-innervation (TMR). By rewiring nerves from amputated limbs, new interfaces allow for prosthetic control with existing muscles. Former Army Staff Sgt. Glen Lehman, injured in Iraq, recently demonstrated this when he was able to control his prosthetic arm through simultaneous joint control, thanks to support from the RE-NET program. center_img DARPA’s Reliable Neural-Interface Technology (RE-NET) program researched the long-term viability of brain interfaces and continues its research to develop high-performance, reliable peripheral interfaces. These new peripheral interfaces use signals from nerves or muscles to both, control prosthetics and provide direct sensory feedback. Ongoing clinical trials present compelling examples of both interface types. “With the RE-NET program, DARPA took on the mission of giving our wounded vets increased control of advanced prosthetics,” added Judy. “TMR is already being used by numerous amputees at military hospitals. As the RE-NET program continues, we expect that the limb-control and sensory-feedback capabilities of peripheral-interface technologies will increase and that they will become even more widely available in the future.” Since 2000, more than 2,000 service members have suffered amputated limbs. DARPA’s breakthrough research with advanced prosthetic limbs controlled by brain interfaces is well documented, but such research is currently limited to quadriplegics; practical applications of brain interfaces for amputees are still in the future. In contrast, nerve and muscle interfaces allow amputees to control advanced prosthetics in the near term. Recent demonstrations may give wounded warriors hope that they can soon take advantage of these breakthroughs. last_img read more

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2nd Long Island Reptile Amnesty Day Planned

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The Suffolk SPCA said 18 alligators have been found on Long Island since last September.A second illegal reptile amnesty day has been scheduled for next week on Long Island, where more than a dozen illegally released alligators have turned up since last year, officials said.Anyone who owns an illegal reptile or amphibian can anonymously drop it off, no questions asked, from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 7 at the Petco on Middle Country Road in Selden, according to the Suffolk County SPCA.“People who are in possession of these animals unlawfully can turn them in to us without fear of prosecution,” said Roy Gross, chief of the Suffolk SPCA. “No one will be asked to give their name.”Trained reptile handlers will be on hand for the event, the second since April, when three gators were turned in. It is in partnership with New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and U.S. Department of Agriculture. The only requirement is that the animal be in a container.Gross said 18 alligators have been unlawfully released in the area, including five this summer in Suffolk County and one in Mount Vernon. Thirteen had been found between in Nassau and Suffolk counties September and April. Most recently, a 2 ½-foot python was found on a Bay Shore side street two weeks ago.Owning alligators is illegal without proper permit, but those that buy baby gators anyway release them when they get older and more difficult to handle. They cannot survive cold New York winters.“Abandoned and dangerous reptiles and amphibians have become an all to common occurrence here on Long Island,” said Peter Scully, the LI regional director of the DEC. “All too often, individuals do not realize the difficulties and complications that arise from owning one of these animals.”Animals that will be accepted include large constrictor snakes such as the Burmese Python, Reticulated Python, African Rock Python, Green Anaconda, Yellow Anaconda, Australian Amethystine Python and Indian Python.Large lizards and Monitors accepted include the Asiatic (water) Monitor, Nile Monitor, White Throat Monitor, Black Throat Monitor, Crocodile Monitor, Komodo Dragon and all species and sub-species of Crocodilia such as alligators, crocodiles and caimans.last_img read more

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Cinderella’s revenge

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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St. Louis 6th graders build and engineer cars

first_imgL-R) . Rhea Miller and Sadie WachsmannBatesville, In. — Sixth Grade class had the opportunity to explore engineering when Kids Discovery visited St. Louis School.Students were given two specific challenges and had to create cars to meet the guidelines. They then raced the cars against fellow teams to see whose was the fastest and best built. They went through the steps of engineering in their process.last_img

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IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National Point Standings Through June 25

first_imgIMCA Xtreme Motor Sports Modifieds – 1. Keith White, Little River Academy, Texas, 1,154; 2. Chris Abelson, Sioux City, Iowa, 1,117; 3. William Gould, Calera, Okla., 1,111; 4. Glen Hibbard, Euless, Texas, 1,086; 5. Tim Ward, Gilbert, Ariz., 1,065; 6. Dean Abbey, Waco, Texas, 1,063; 7. Jesse Sobbing, Glenwood, Iowa, 1,055; 8. Ronnie Welborn, Princeton, Texas, 1,050; 9. Ryan Roath, Phoenix, Ariz., 1,017; 10. Zane DeVilbiss, Farmington, N.M., 1,010; 11. Ronn Lauritzen, Jesup, Iowa, 1,006; 12. Mike Jergens, Plover, Iowa, 1,003; 13. Kyle Wilson, Monterey, Calif., 996; 14. Cayden Carter, Oskaloosa, Iowa, and Alexander Wilson, Salinas, Calif., both 974; 16. Clay Sellard, Ellis, Kan., 956; 17. Ben Ketteman, Pflugerville, Texas, 931; 18. Joe Spillman, Marble Falls, Texas, 930; 19. Brian Schultz, Casa Grande, Ariz., 912; 20. Tommy Fain, Abilene, Texas, 899.IMCA Late Models – 1. Todd Cooney, Des Moines, Iowa, 786; 2. Justin L. Kay, Wheatland, Iowa, 723; 3. Curt Schroeder, Ames, Iowa, 703; 4. Curtis Glover, Des Moines, Iowa, 641; 5. Dar­rel DeFrance, Marshalltown, Iowa, 635; 6. Jason Hahne, Webster City, Iowa, 616; 7. Ryan Grif­fith, Webster City, Iowa, 602; 8. Nick Marolf, Moscow, Iowa, 595; 9. Todd Malmstrom, Silvis, Ill., 553; 10. John Emerson, Waterloo, Iowa, 525; 11. Jerry King, Waterloo, Iowa, 473; 12. Craig Ja­cobs, Urbandale, Iowa, 468; 13. Matt Ryan, Davenport, Iowa, 452; 14. Jeremy Grady, Story City, Iowa, 448; 15. Colby Springsteen, Wapello, Iowa, 446; 16. Ray Guss Jr., Milan, Ill., 441; 17. Nate Beuseling, Silvis, Ill., 438; 18. Joel Callahan, Dubuque, Iowa, 432; 19. Ben Nading, Ankeny, Iowa, and Rob Toland, Davenport, Iowa, both 418. IMCA Eagle Motorsports RaceSaver Sprint Cars – 1. Jeb Sessums, Burleson, Texas, 738; 2. Chase Brewer, Springtown, Texas, 724; 3. Kyle Jones, Kennedale, Texas, 721; 4. Marcus Thomas, Corsicana, Texas, 652; 5. Dustin Woods, Forney, Texas, 649; 6. John Ricketts, Bur­leson, Texas, 575; 7. Clint Benson, Papillion, Neb., 553; 8. Mark Klis, Waxahachie, Texas, 534; 9. Chad Wilson, North Richland Hills, Texas, 523; 10. Tony Dowd, Mansfield, Texas, 522; 11. George White, Fort Worth, Texas, 519; 12. Justin Fifield, Mesquite, Texas, 477; 13. D.J. Estes Jr., Mansfield, Texas, 459; 14. Logan Scherb, Paradise, Texas, 452; 15. Ryan Hall, Midlothian, Texas, 444; 16. Herbert R. Wood, Kennedale, Texas, 376; 17. Lindell Jenkins Jr., Greenville, Texas, 357; 18. Michelle Melton, Flower Mound, Texas, 341; 19. Matt Moro, Polk City, Iowa, and Colby Estes, Mansfield, Texas, both 336.IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars – 1. Matt Guillaume, Haslet, Texas, 1,155; 2. Michael W. Nichols, Har­lan, Iowa, 1,107; 3. Derek Green, Granada, Minn., 1,088; 4. Kirk Martin, Weatherford, Texas, 1,087; 5. Donavon Smith, Lake City, Iowa, 1,075; 6. Brian Blessington, Breda, Iowa, 1,048; 7. Dennis Bissonnette, Stephenville, Texas, 1,040; 8. Colby Deming, Hobbs, N.M., 1,039; 9. Jay Schmidt Jr., Tama, Iowa, 991; 10. Jason Batt, Harker Heights, Texas, 989; 11. Damon Murty, Chel­sea, Iowa, 988; 12. Devin Smith, Lake City, Iowa, 970; 13. Colin Deming, Hobbs, N.M., 924; 14. Michael Sheen, Lamesa, Texas, 903; 15. Kyle Clough, Wallace, Neb., 890; 16. James Lynch, Donnellson, Iowa, 880; 17. Gabe Tucker, Carbon, Texas, 867; 18. Nick Tubbs, Colby, Kan., 863; 19. Kevin Opheim, Mason City, Iowa, 860; 20. David Smith, Lake City, Iowa, 830. IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks – 1. Brandon Nielsen, Spencer, Iowa, and April Phillips, Abilene, Texas, both 1,107; 3. Eric Stanton, Carlisle, Iowa, 1,104; 4. Shannon Anderson, Des Moines, Iowa, 1,055; 5. Cody Nielsen, Fort Dodge, Iowa, 955; 6. Tiffany Bittner, Norfolk, Neb., 951; 7. Adam Armstrong, Beatrice, Neb., 933; 8. Jerrad Steele, Andrews, Texas, 915; 9. Justin Lathram, Hobbs, N.M., 905; 10. Colton Pfeifer, Stockton, Kan., 884; 11. Andrew Sebastian, Minot, N.D., 866; 12. John Watson, Des Moines, Iowa, 864; 13. Justin Nehring, Storm Lake, Iowa, 837; 14. Brock Beeter, Minot, N.D., 822; 15. Jeremy Oliver, Chilton, Texas, 810; 16. Benji Irvine, Stanley, Iowa, 791; 17. Halie Brown, Hobbs, N.M., 789; 18. Colby Langenberg, Norfolk, Neb., 785; 19. Lee Ri­ley, Lubbock, Texas, 784; 20. Westin Abbey, Comanche, Texas, 782.Scoggin-Dickey Parts Center Southern SportMods – 1. Jake Upchurch, Grand Prairie, Texas, 1,116; 2. Chad Hertel, Abilene, Texas, 1,110; 3. Cory Williams, Slaton, Texas, 1,090; 4. Allen Mont­gomery, Fort Worth, Texas, 1,009; 5. Justin Long, Haslet, Texas, 1,006; 6. John Freeman, Runaway Bay, Texas, 935; 7. Gabe Tucker, Carbon, Texas, 905; 8. Jon White Jr., Red Oak, Texas, 869; 9. Jeffrey Abbey, Comanche, Texas, 841; 10. Cody Shoemaker, Paradise, Texas, 832; 11. Brad Shirley, Springtown, Texas, 807; 12. Garett Rawls, China Spring, Texas, 785; 13. Robert Scrivner, Woodway, Texas, 761; 14. Kevin Green, Robinson, Texas, 752; 15. Michael Newhard, Royse City, Texas, 751; 16. Gene Burnett, Leander, Texas, 750; 17. Wesley McNorton, Bowie, Texas, 715; 18. Jarrett Roberts, Temple, Texas, 701; 19. Timothy Cummings, Joshua, Texas, 700; 20. Justin Shaw, Sweetwater, Texas, 679. Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMods – 1. Nick Spainhoward, Bakersfield, Calif., 1,135; 2. Ben Kates, Tonganoxie, Kan., 1,130; 3. Clay Money, Penokee, Kan., 1,110; 4. Daniel Gottschalk, El­lis, Kan., 1,096; 5. Rick Diaz, Los Banos, Calif., 1,094; 6. Ethan Dotson, Bakersfield, Calif., 1,088; 7. Carter VanDenBerg, Oskaloosa, Iowa, 1,082; 8. Brett Lowry, Montezuma, Iowa, 1,027; 9. Tyler Frye, Belleville, Kan., 951; 10. Jenae Gustin, Marshalltown, Iowa, 941; 11. Nick Meyer, Whitte­more, Iowa, 927; 12. Colby Heishman, Brooklyn, Iowa, 902; 13. Doug Smith, Lanesboro, Iowa, 897; 14. Wayne Dotson, Bakersfield, Calif., 877; 15. Clinton Luellen, Minburn, Iowa, 847; 16. Bran­don Clough, Wallace, Neb., 836; 17. Kyle Prauner, Norfolk, Neb., 830; 18. Tony Dunker, Quincy, Ill., 826; 19. Joey Gower, Quincy, Ill., 814; 20. Matthew Looft, Swea City, Iowa, 802.Mach-1 Sport Compacts – 1. Nate Coopman, Mankato, Minn., 1,178; 2. Bill Whalen Jr., River­side, Iowa, 1,097; 3. Cody Thompson, Sioux City, Iowa, 1,090; 4. Tyler Thompson, Sioux City, Iowa, 1,068; 5. Ramsey Meyer, Pierce, Neb., 1,006; 6. Jacob Kofoot, Bode, Iowa, 904; 7. Shan­non Pospisil, Norfolk, Neb., 871; 8. Ryan Bryant, Mason City, Iowa, 861; 9. Megan Lappegard, Spencer, Iowa, 860; 10. Jay DeVries, Spencer, Iowa, 811; 11. Kaitlyn DeVries, Spencer, Iowa, 800; 12. Austen Becerra, Carthage, Ill., 737; 13. Brooke Fluckiger, Columbus, Neb., 731; 14. Lance Mielke, Norfolk, Neb., 669; 15. Caine Mahlberg, Dunlap, Iowa, 665; 16. John Whalen, Ains­worth, Iowa, 648; 17. Kiowa Higdon, Hays, Kan., 641; 18. Michael Smith, Stockton, Kan., 631; 19. Art Herzog, Hays, Kan., 627; 20. Kirk Pfannenstiel, Hays, Kan., 616. West Coast Super Stocks – 1. Steve Nash, Pahrump, Nev., 304; 2. Lonnie Welch, Bakersfield, Calif., 264; 3. Tim Randolph, Santa Maria, Calif., 254; 4. Billy Simkins, Bakersfield, Calif., 208; 5. Chad Weber, Santa Maria, Calif., 186; 6. Brady Bell, Bakersfield, Calif., 182; 7. Wayne Coffman, Bodfish, Calif., 161; 8. Clay Daly, Watsonville, Calif., 154; 9. Johnny Bedingfield, Bakersfield, Ca­lif., 135; 10. Dustin Chastain, Tonopah, Nev., 132; 11. Jon Blackford, Nipomo, Calif., 128; 12. George Bradburry, Pahrump, Nev., 125; 13. James C. Wulfenstein, Pahrump, Nev., 105; 14. Don­ald W. Riley, Pahrump, Nev., 99; 15. Daniel Vlaszof, Las Vegas, Nev., 72; 16. Dale Daffern, Las Vegas, Nev., and Toby Randolph, Nipomo, Calif., both 71; 18. Alex Williams, Pahrump, Nev., 68; 19. William A. Stevens, Bakersfield, Calif., 66; 20. Jim McCoy, Pahrump, Nev., 64.last_img read more

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Merced Speedway preps for June 15 Ed Parker Memorial

first_imgMERCED, Calif. – IMCA Modifieds race for $1,700 to win, Karl Kustoms Northern SportMods for $1,000 to win at Merced Speedway’s Saturday, June 15 Ed Parker Memorial. Spectator admission is $15 for adults, $13 for seniors and military, $5 for students ages six to 12 and free for five and under. Pit passes are $40. A Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational ballot berth is at stake for the Modifieds, who race for a minimum of $100 to start. SportMods taking the feature green earn a minimum of $60.  Pit gates open at 2 p.m. and the grandstand opens at 5 p.m. Hot laps are at 5:45 p.m. with racing to follow. There is no entry fee for the draw/redraw show. IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National, E3 Spark Plugs State and track points will be awarded in both divisions. Modifieds also contend for Larry Shaw Race Cars Western Region points. More information about the second annual event is posted on the www.mercedspeedway.net website.last_img read more

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The Latest: Cricket in England on hold amid pandemic

first_imgMore AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports,Tampa Bay Lightning advance to face Dallas Stars in Stanley Cup finals, beating New York Islanders 2-1 in OT in Game 6 Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditThe Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world:___England will try to reschedule its test series with the West Indies after announcing there will be no professional cricket played in the country until July 1 at the earliest because of the coronavirus pandemic. April 24, 2020 The Latest: Cricket in England on hold amid pandemiccenter_img The inaugural season of The Hundred is due to start on July 17 and has not yet been canceled. The England and Wales Cricket Board has arranged a meeting for next week to discuss whether it can go ahead.No domestic competitions have been scrapped for this year.The ECB says the international season in England will now be played from July to the end of September. The three-test series against the West Indies that was due to start on June 4 has been postponed.ECB chief executive Tom Harrison says his organization is following advice from the government and health experts and that “our plan is to reschedule international matches as late as possible in the season to give the best chance of play.”___ Associated Press last_img read more

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