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Police Merit Commission Agenda

first_imgEVANSVILLE POLICE MERIT COMMISSIONMEETING AGENDAMonday, March 13, 20172:00 p.m.  Room 307, Civic Center ComplexEXECUTIVE SESSION: ADJOURNMENTFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare The executive session and hearing are closed as provided by: An executive session and a closed hearing will be held prior to the open session. APPROVAL OF CLAIMS: APPLICANT REVIEW: 16-03216-06616-109 I.C. 5-14-1.5-6.1(b)(5): To receive information about and interview prospective employees.I.C. 5-14-1.5-6.1(b)(6)(A): With respect to any individual over whom the governing body has jurisdiction to receive information concerning the individual’s alleged misconduct.I.C. 5-14-1.5-6.1(b)(9): To discuss a job performance evaluation of individual employees.  This subdivision does not apply to a discussion of the salary, compensation, or benefits of employees during a budget process. PENDING DISCIPLINARY MATTERS: Personnel Order 16-PO-27:  Officer Marcus Craig, Badge Number 1250 – 21 day suspension, with a further recommendation that the Merit Commission consider termination.  Appeal hearing to be set at later date pending disability hearing per motion at February 21st meeting.center_img ACKNOWLEDGE GUESTS APPROVAL OF MINUTES: REMINDERS:  The next meeting will by Monday, March 27, 2017 with the Executive Session beginning at 2:00pm. CALL TO ORDER OLD BUSINESS.  Resolution of Personnel Order 16-PO-34. OPEN SESSION: February 23, 2017 (Hegeman, Cook, and Scott)last_img read more

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Concert will raise funds for Hoboken writer and volunteer Jack Silbert

first_imgHOBOKEN — A benefit for local musician Jack Silbert will take place at Monty Hall, 43 Montgomery St. Jersey City, on Saturday, Feb. 11 at 8 p.m. and admission is $10.The concert will raise funds for Silbert, a well-known supporter of local musicians and a volunteer for many local groups, who fell ill last year. It will feature performances by Karyn Kuhl, Speed The Plough, Matt Davis, and a reunion of the Vines in Hoboken after a 25 year hiatus.Tickets for the concert can be purchased in advance at Ticktfly.com. ×last_img read more

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BIA 2012 open for entries

first_imgConfectioner of the Year, sponsored by Dawn FoodsA lot has changed in confectionery over the years and confectioners have to embrace these changes to maximise sales. Since the recession, confectioners have had to work harder to entice customers with innovative products and competitive prices. Confectioners also have to strike the right balance between the new and exciting and the old and familiar. Karl Brown, vice-president, Dawn Foods said “We’re looking for entries from companies who can show us how good their products are, from staple to creative and seasonal. We will be judging based on entire ranges – everything from the design of products to their target consumer and what times of day they were designed for will be taken into consideration.” In-Store Bakery Retailer of the Year The Craft Business Award, sponsored by ADM MillingThis award recognises the passion and dedication of UK craft businesses in offering the finest-quality products and service. The category is open to all sectors of craft bakery, whether entrants operate a single retail shop or multiple high street locations or even a wholesale craft bakery. In addition to the finished quality of products, judges will also be assessing criteria such as maintaining the craft element in the business, innovation, marketing initiatives/promotions, and safety, as well as measurable success in the marketplace. “We are seeking entrants who have demonstrated outstanding achievements in response to market conditions, trends or product innovation.” Peter Hayes, national sales manager, ADM. Baker of the Year The Retail Innovation Award The Rising Star Award Bakery Food Manufacturer of the Year The Rising Star Award, sponsored by Whitworth BrosTo ensure the UK baking industry remains strong, innovative, forward-thinking and profitable, it is vital to maintain and improve the quality and understanding of the people working within it. “We are looking for people who are enterprising, have drive and ambition and are intent on making a successful career in bakery or confectionery. They need to stand out from the crowd and be able to demonstrate the achievements they have made during the past three years since entering college or the trade.” Roger Butler, managing director, Whitworth Bros. Bakery Food Manufacturer of the Year, sponsored by Golden Valley Pallet Wrap SpecialistsThis award recognises quality products and services. It may be that you have grown from traditional craft bakery roots and now supply to many shops. Or you may be an excellent speciality baker or cake-maker. As well as quality, the judges in this category will be considering process efficiency, innovation, marketing, health and safety and environmental issues, plus success in the marketplace. “The passion for excellence we observed at BIA 2011 inspired us to sponsor Bakery Food Manufacturer of the Year for 2012.” Colin Griffiths, chairman, Golden Valley Pallet Wrap Specialists. This new award is designed to recognise outstanding efforts and innovation by high street bakery retailers. It is open to all kinds of bakery outlets, coffee shops take-away and cake businesses. Judges will be looking for businesses that can demonstrate how they have revamped or improved their bakery business to drive incremental sales growth and improve their retail environment. This could be a new store layout, new branding, eye-catching displays or new additions to their product range. “The value of attracting customers with attention-grabbing presentation, service, availability and high standards is paramount to surviving and thriving on the high street.” Alastair Macphie, chief executive, Macphie. Celebration Cake Maker of the Year The Product Innovation Award, sponsored by AsdaThis award is open to all sizes of bakery business, from small craft producers right up to major industrial manufacturers. Whether you supply retail, wholesale or foodservice, Asda is waiting to hear from you. You will just need to show how your innovation benefits the end-consumer. “Innovation not only helps us meet the challenges of today, but keeps bakery at the forefront of the shopping basket.” John Cummings, category directory for bakery, Asda. If you have an innovation with real consumer appeal, make sure you enter today. In-Store Bakery Retailer of the Year, sponsored ZeelandiaThis award is open to large retail operators that have a minimum of 100 in-store bakeries and employ bakers. Richard Schrama, managing director, Zeelandia said “We will be looking for ISB retailers that demonstrate innovation, quality and breadth of product range.” If you are a major retailer with a full ISB offering of fresh bakery products, including speciality breads, morning goods and a choice of cakes and pastries then make sure you enter this category. The Craft Business Award Celebration Cake Maker of the Year, sponsored by RenshawAttracting entries from the country’s most accomplished bakers and cake decorators, successful contenders are challenged to set new standards in creative baking. The emphasis is not only on skill, but on imagination, with the judging panel looking for unique, innovative and inspiring designs of the highest calibre. Sarah Summers, commercial director, Renshaw said “The awards present a great sense of personal achievement and pride for entrants and their businesses. We are thrilled to sponsor this inspirational award and to recognise the creative and individual talent of the country’s top celebration cake designers.” Confectioner of the Year The Customer Focus Award Speciality Bread Product of the Year, sponsored by British BakelsThis award recognises flair, individuality, creativity and consumer appeal. Paul Morrow, member of Bakels Group management board said “Often led by artisan and craft bakers, this award is nevertheless open to all sectors – from small bakers up to large automated manufacturers, making packaged or unwrapped bread. Entrants could be selling the breads in their own shops, to local restaurants or pubs, or supplying foodservice or supermarkets.” The judges will be looking for breads that are original, taste and look good and have been a hit with consumers. Entrants should also be able to show marketing, customer service and business skills. Speciality Bread Product of the Year The Customer Focus Award, sponsored by CSM United KingdomTo enter The Customer Focus Award, you may be a craft business, a plant baker, a foodservice supplier or a cake-maker. Small, large or in-between, it makes no difference, as long as you do not stand still. John Lindsay, sales director, CSM (United Kingdom) said “In these challenging times, companies need to consider how their customers think, and what their challenges are and then provide solutions that not only meet all those needs but surpass their customers’ expectations. We want companies that can show how they take customer support to a new level.” The Product Innovation Award British Baker is pleased to announce entries for the 2012 Baking Industry Awards are now open.Organised by British Baker, the awards are now in their 25th year and will take place on Wednesday 12 September at the Park Lane Hilton in London.The Baking Industry Awards acknowledge and reward bakery companies and professionals from around the country for their contributions to the industry.Martyn Leek, editor of British Baker, said: “Now in its 25th year, the awards celebrate people from one of the most innovative trades in the world who show skill, passion, energy and enthusiasm. Perhaps you are a brilliant baker, or you have a talented ’rising star’ among your staff. Just entering makes you look hard at your business and sends a positive message to your customers.”This year sees a brand new category for bakers to enter – the Retail Innovation Award – which will recognise outstanding efforts and innovation by high street bakery retailers.Other categories to enter include:Baker of the Year, sponsored by VandemoorteleThis award is open to any individual with hands-on baking expertise. We are looking for a baker who has a passion for baking quality products – whether for a small artisanal business or a large plant bakery. This category is predominantly about the person rather than the company. “We are looking for bakers who are giving customers added value in these austere times, following and setting trends and helping to future-proof their businesses. We are looking for someone who can demonstrate that end-product excellence remains paramount.” Stephen Bickmore, UK commercial manager, Vandemoortele’s Lipids Division. The Lifetime Achievement Award, sponsored by DélifranceTo enter the awards, either:Contact: Rebecca George on 01293 610422 or [email protected]: www.bakeryawards.co.ukDeadline for entries is Friday 11 Maylast_img read more

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FDA warns not to use several hand sanitizers made by Eskbiochem

first_img Google+ Previous articleSt. Joseph, Elkhart counties’ unemployment rate shrinkingNext articleNew IHSAA Commissioner confident about fall sports starting on time 95.3 MNCNews/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel is your breaking news and weather station for northern Indiana and southwestern Michigan. Twitter Google+ IndianaLocalMichiganNews Twitter By 95.3 MNC – June 23, 2020 1 569 WhatsApp (Photo supplied/Food and Drug Administration) (Food and Drug Administration) The FDA advises consumers not to use any hand sanitizer manufactured by Eskbiochem SA de CV in Mexico, due to the potential presence of methanol (wood alcohol), a substance that can be toxic when absorbed through the skin or ingested. FDA has identified the following products manufactured by Eskbiochem:All-Clean Hand Sanitizer (NDC: 74589-002-01)Esk Biochem Hand Sanitizer (NDC: 74589-007-01)CleanCare NoGerm Advanced Hand Sanitizer 75% Alcohol (NDC: 74589-008-04)Lavar 70 Gel Hand Sanitizer (NDC: 74589-006-01)The Good Gel Antibacterial Gel Hand Sanitizer (NDC: 74589-010-10)CleanCare NoGerm Advanced Hand Sanitizer 80% Alcohol (NDC: 74589-005-03)CleanCare NoGerm Advanced Hand Sanitizer 75% Alcohol (NDC: 74589-009-01)CleanCare NoGerm Advanced Hand Sanitizer 80% Alcohol (NDC: 74589-003-01)Saniderm Advanced Hand Sanitizer (NDC: 74589-001-01)FDA tested samples of Lavar Gel and CleanCare No Germ. Lavar Gel contains 81 percent (v/v) methanol and no ethyl alcohol, and CleanCare No Germ contains 28 percent (v/v) methanol. Methanol is not an acceptable ingredient for hand sanitizers and should not be used due to its toxic effects.Consumers who have been exposed to hand sanitizer containing methanol should seek immediate treatment, which is critical for potential reversal of toxic effects of methanol poisoning. Substantial methanol exposure can result in nausea, vomiting, headache, blurred vision, permanent blindness, seizures, coma, permanent damage to the nervous system or death. Although all persons using these products on their hands are at risk, young children who accidently ingest these products and adolescents and adults who drink these products as an alcohol (ethanol) substitute, are most at risk for methanol poisoning.On June 17, 2020, FDA contacted Eskbiochem to recommend the company remove its hand sanitizer products from the market due to the risks associated with methanol poisoning. To date, the company has not taken action to remove these potentially dangerous products from the market. Therefore, FDA recommends consumers stop using these hand sanitizers and dispose of them immediately in appropriate hazardous waste containers. Do not flush or pour these products down the drain.FDA reminds consumers to wash their hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after coughing, sneezing, or blowing one’s nose. If soap and water are not readily available, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend consumers use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 percent ethanol.FDA remains vigilant and will continue to take action when quality issues arise with hand sanitizers. Additionally, the agency is concerned with false and misleading claims for hand sanitizers, for example that they can provide prolonged protection such as 24-hours against viruses including COVID-19, since there is no evidence to support these claims.To date, FDA is not aware of any reports of adverse events associated with these hand sanitizer products. FDA encourages health care professionals, consumers and patients to report adverse events or quality problems experienced with the use of hand sanitizers to FDA’s MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program:Complete and submit the report online; orDownload and complete the form, then submit it via fax at 1-800-FDA-0178. Facebook Facebook Pinterest Pinterest WhatsApp FDA warns not to use several hand sanitizers made by Eskbiochemlast_img read more

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Bakery wholesaler Walker Humphrey acquires Rolton Yeast

first_imgSource: Getty ImagesBakery wholesaler Walker Humphrey has acquired family business Rolton Yeast.Walker Humphrey was approached by Rolton, which is also a wholesaler albeit on a smaller scale, about buying the business in March with the deal signed this month.Rolton has a turnover of £1.3m with one site and six staff based in Oldham. The acquisition will see the site closed and staff made redundant while operations and stock holding will be transferred to Walker Humphrey’s site in Sherburn in Elmet, North Yorkshire.Walker Humphrey supplies a wide range of ingredients to businesses across the UK bakery industry.“Rolton’s business will offer Walker Humphrey new customers within areas that we already supply with our fleet of temperature-controlled trucks,” Martin Humphrey, managing director at Walker Humphrey told British Baker.“This was a perfect and easy acquisition for our business as it will result in the investment of just one other HGV driver and truck to compliment what we already do at Sherburn, adding further growth to the craft bakery sector.”Rolton owners Martin and Peter Hey were keen that the firm was passed to a company who offered the same level of service to their customers, he added. The pair will continue to work with Walker Humphrey over the next few months to enable a smooth transition for their customers.“We are delighted that Martin and Peter have chosen Walker Humphrey to pass their business onto and we are determined, as a family managed company, to continue to provide the loyal Rolton’s customers with the excellent service they have come to expect thanks to the Hey brothers,” he added.The history of Rolton of OldhamTrading as Rolton Yeast, the company was established in Oldham just after the second world war as a one man, bike delivery service by Leo Rolton. He saw a gap in the market and began delivering boxes of yeast to these street traders, many of whom went on to establish bakeries themselves.As demand grew, Rolton’s business was incorporated in 1947 and was eventually sold to a Mr Cook who expanded the business to provide other bakery wholesale products.In the early eighties Alan Hey bought the business. He had previous experience of the bakery industry first as a wagon driver, then as a rep before becoming managing director of Bowers Bakery Service. When he retired in 1989 the business was passed on to his sons Peter and Martin, who headed up the business until the acquisition in 2020.The pair were able to continue to grow the business over the years with customers from around the Manchester, Oldham and Huddersfield areas.After 42 years in the family business, Peter now plans to retire while Martin, who has worked there for 31 years, will spend more time in his other role as a fitness teacher.last_img read more

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Manchester Police Broke Up An LSD Teddy Grahams Operation At Bonnaroo

first_imgAt any music festival, there’s bound to be a presence of drugs. With tens of thousands attending Bonnaroo each year, it’s no surprise that plainclothes officers found lots of controlled substances on site, though they do make it a point to only go after those selling the drugs.“There’s people that come just to sell drugs and that’s who we look for,” said Manchester Police Chief Yogi Yother in a statement published by News Channel 5. The Chief emphasized that the majority of Bonnaroo attendees are there for the music and experience.Still, among all of the substances confiscated, one particular item was a new discovery for their police team: LSD Teddy Grahams. “They had them on the table and droppers dropping hits of acid on each Teddy Graham,” said Chief Yother. It sounds like a delicious way to trip, but the operation had to be broken up once discovered.The article states that “marijuana, mushrooms, pills, Molly or Ecstasy and quite a bit of LSD” were all confiscated on site, as well as some cash from various dealings. The article also states that the confiscated substances will be used as evidence to prosecute those dealers, and will ultimately be destroyed.Take note: if you come to Bonnaroo to sell drugs, blot your acid on snack foods before showing up on site.last_img read more

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Governor Cuomo Says Businesses Can Require Customers To Wear Masks

first_imgGovernor Cuomo hosts his daily Coronavirus briefing at the Madison Square Boys & Girls Club in Brooklyn, where he was joined by Brooklynites Chris Rock and Rosie Perez. The actors were on hand to promote testing and the wearing of PPE while in public. Image by Kevin P. Coughlin / Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo.BROOKLYN — New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo says that businesses are legally allowed to require customers to wear face masks.The Governor during his Thursday press conference said he’s signing an executive order that allows business owners to deny entry to people who aren’t wearing a mask or face covering.The Governor has stated in the past that he believes the numbers show masks are effective in helping slow the spread of the Coronavirus.To help enforce his point, actors Rosie Perez and Chris Rock joined Cuomo on Thursday to promote mask use and getting tested. Normally saving this portion of his talks for later, Cuomo went straight into discussion about federal action after announcing the latest COVID-19 numbers, which showed 74 deaths on Wednesday. 22 of those people were nursing home residents.The Governor met with President Donald Trump on Wednesday morning, where they discussed additional funding from the federal government.This is something Cuomo has long been pushing for, as he says schools and essential services like police and hospitals will see massive cuts without it.Previously, the federal government passed a stimulus package that resulted in payments averaging at $1,200 per citizen, but more is needed, the Governor says.Looking at the reopening of New York, Cuomo says the economy needs more than just an open door. It needs revitalization, he says.Most of New York has begun Phase One of the reopening schedule, but New York City has yet to meet the metrics.“Once you hit Phase One, you continue to monitor the metrics,” Cuomo said, speaking on the progression of the reopening phases.Reopening New York City is important to Cuomo, as he has referred to it as “an economic engine of the state, the country and the world.” Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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‘Hatching’ young entrepreneurs

first_imgMichigan State University Federal Credit Union supports campus business incubatorby: Karen BankstonMore than half of all young people are interested in entrepreneurship, and a quarter are already self-employed, according to a U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation report. Millennials “have the ideas and innovative qualities of successful entrepreneurs,” the report suggests. “With more guidance, funding and encouragement, this entrepreneurial spirit may just run free and do its part in creating more jobs and helping rescue the economy.”Michigan State University Federal Credit Union is doing its part to spark this spirit by supporting a business incubator on the MSU campus and offering “startUP loans” for small businesses in its tri-county region.The credit union provided a three-year grant to double the size of “The Hatch,” a co-working space where students can pursue their entrepreneurial visions, to more than 2,500 square feet. MSU FCU also offers individual financial education and group workshops at The Hatch on topics like developing a business plan and incorporating a business, says CUES member April Clobes, EVP/chief operating officer for the $2.7 billion credit union with 191,000 members.The Hatch is a shared workspace where students pursuing any field of study can collaborate to develop their business ideas with other students, university fellows, and mentors-in-residence. If they need additional funding once they launch their business, they can apply for an MSU FCU startUP loan, with a low rate on up to $15,000.The loans are designed “to fill in some of the financing gaps, not fund a business in full,” Clobes explains. “They could provide unrestricted funds for marketing, to purchase equipment or develop a prototype on the way to seeking financing.” continue reading » 9SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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10 Questions With Nine Days, Long Island’s Comeback Kids

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York By Kate NalepinskiNine Days, the Long Island-based band best known for their late ’90s pop hit, “Absolutely (Story of a Girl),” is back and better than ever after a 10-year hiatus. In advance of their July 16 album release show at the YMCA Boulton Center in Bay Shore, the Press spoke with the band’s lead singer, John Hampson, and lead guitarist, Brian Desveaux, to discuss their upcoming album, Snapshots, as well as working with legendary music producer Jim Scott and their relentless commitment to making music.Long Island Press: You guys are releasing a full-length album after 10 years out of the music scene. A lot has changed. How do you think your new album will invite new listeners?Brian Desveaux: The single “Green light” went to radio mid-June, so people are going to start hearing it. There’s also a new, re-recorded version of “Absolutely (Story of a Girl),” and it’s much more alive and in-your-face. That’s kind of there to remind people of who we are, since we have been out of the scene for a while. It’s definitely a lot of new music, and it’s closest to the last album, kind of going back to our rock sound…I think people will like it. I guess we’ll see. We did some recordings down here [in Nashville] in 2013, and we talked to some people I knew. John came down. It’s been about a year and a half, and we’re just so pumped to release this. It’s physical. It’s ready to come out.LIP: Brian, you separated from John to work on your country music. Does that mean there’s a strong country-influence on the album?BD: I wouldn’t say there’s a strong country sound in the sense that we went in to make a country record. Maybe lyrically and melodically, it does kind of lean in that direction. I think it had a lot to do with the writers we were working with…And me, like I said, I’ve always been into country as I’ve spent the past 10 years in Nashville. So I think it’s definitely influenced by country. I feel like pop music is just what country music has turned into, so…John Hampson: Making a record is a long process. It’s not like we jumped into this and said, “Hey! Let’s go write a whole record in Nashville!” It was a very natural progression of writing and music. We haven’t put out a record on a label in 10 years, but we still always wrote music. We still recorded music. We still played. I think this was just the natural path of the band. In the end, we not only wrote the record in Nashville with these other guys—which was an awesome experience—it always had to feel like us. It had to sound like the band. Everything had that authentic stamp of connection…Like, “this is a song that feels like me,” or, “Brian wrote this for himself,” and then we bring it to the rest of the band, and everyone puts their two cents in, and then it sounds like Nine Days. So, in terms of Nashville country, the elements are there, but it’s not the focus. It’s just the way it came out.LIP: What motivated you to get back into the music scene after a 10-year break?JH: You got to go back 10 years ago when we wrapped up our time at Epic Records. Everyone in the band kind of realized how difficult the whole process was…I’m not sure how to phrase it, but it felt like pushing that boulder up a hill again. And I think we all felt like, “Oh, crap, I don’t know if I want to do that again.” We all kind of wanted to figure out our lives…Brian went to Nashville. Some of us started families. Some of us started other careers, but none of us ever stopped loving music. I think it had to happen when it happened…We continued to write. We put out an EP, but it just happened that right around 2013, we all reached a point in our personal lives where we felt like we could make Nine Days a priority again. It took a couple years of playing and writing and figuring out what we wanted to do with it, in terms of meeting the right people. It was all a really natural progression of events where we found ourselves really investing in the band, and it felt good, so we kept doing it.BD: It’s like a cycle, I think. Fans of our genre of music, way back in the late ’90s, I think they grew up, too. And we’re recognizable to them as Nine Days. I think it’s just perfect timing for this release.LIP: How does your new album, Snapshot, sound different from your past work?JH: Nine Days really started being a band at this place called the Village Pub in Port Jeff. We did that for about a year and a half, and that was an incredible way to have the band grow. When we started up, we were more acoustic-driven, more Americana, indirectly influenced by Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Neil Young, Counting Crows, and we were trying to tell stories. So, when “Absolutely (Story of a Girl)” blew up, it was an anomaly. It was this three-minute, great pop song, which was awesome, but the band always had its roots in Americana songwriting. Going back to writing with these people in Nashville, it didn’t feel foreign; it felt like we had gone back to how we originated and started the band…So we applied 20 years of musical wisdom to our original sound. For us, it doesn’t sound very different from everything else. It just feels like a 2016 album. It feels great. I love the sound of the record. It’s really strong all the way through the songs.LIP: Back in 2000, The Madding Crowd became a certified gold album due to the success of “Absolutely (Story of a Girl).” Which song do you think is going to be the hit this time, besides the encore version of the same song?BD: I’m hoping it’s “Green Light” because that’s our single. There’s other stuff on this album, though, that’s also story-telling. There are couple others that I think are catchy tunes, like the song on there called “Two Straws,” which we recorded in Nashville. But you never know what’s going to be a hit. It could be anything.JH: I think our goal is to really have this record do what Thriller did in 1983 and have a top Number One hit, and sell 30 million. Totally. No, I’m just kidding.BD: Hey, you gotta shoot the moon, right?LIP: Snapshot was produced by Jim Scott, who’s worked with Wilco, Grace Potter and others. How does this raise the bar for your new album?JH: I loved working with Jim.BD: Jim was awesome. He adapted to us.JH: He had a lot of great motivational sayings in the studio…Helpful, believe it or not. We had talked to a lot of different producers, and there are a lot of great people out there that we love to work with but we wanted to work with one guy. A lot of pop bands today work with multiple producers. We just wanted one guy to be the last set of ears. We had a year and a half of songs and demos, so we needed someone with a fresh perspective. Jim’s track record [of working with artists] is amazing. If it passes his smell test, you know the album is good. The way that he talks about making a record in David Grohl’s Sound City documentary is exactly how we wanted to make this record, and how we like to make them. We’re all live. We’re all in the studio. We’re all playing at the same time with a vintage console with two old microphones.LIP: Are there any misconceptions about your band, or yourselves, that you want to clear up?JH: I don’t even know what the misperception is other than we sing only that one song. We are classified as a one-hit-wonder, and we had one hit, so, yeah, sure, it fits. I’m not going to argue the tag. But I’m a fan of music. I’ve definitely bought albums in my life that had one good song on it and the rest was crap. So, if anybody out there happens to perceive us like, “Oh, that’s probably what their records are,” that would be a misperception. I think our band is a songwriter band. We happened to have one top-hit song. But at the end of the day, we’re songwriters. Brian and I teamed up, and we’ve been playing since we were basically 18 because it just felt right, and it was natural. So, every song is a good song. Whether they’re hits or not is irrelevant. If you’re just looking for a great album, this is it.LIP: Do you fee like when you were starting up, in the beginning of your music career, your goal was more oriented toward being successful?BD: When we started this band, we actually just spent a year writing before we even recorded. I think we grew up listening to albums. And the first couple of albums we put out, we actually put inside the records, like, “Hey, this isn’t our big album. We’re not trying to get a record deal. We just wanted to record some music.” So, for the first few records, we were just making music and putting it out there and playing a lot. I guess, at a certain point, after three records, we really started to showcase ourselves in NYC, making contacts and such. But in the beginning we were just making music.JH: I agree, I think Brian said it right—I was just having this conversation the other day—we had an amazing experience writing and recording the record. Whatever happens after this isn’t really in our control anymore. We let it go into the world, and whatever happens, just happens. That’s one thing that’s different now than when we put out The Madding Crowd. Now we can truly be happy with our record and not be stressed about what happens next.LIP: I always ask artists what they think their lives would be like if they went down a different career path. But I feel like with you guys you went on a different path and simultaneously worked on music. Would you agree?JH: I think that’s exactly what we did, and it kind of came out the other side a little bit. Brian said it before. I think it would have been amazing if we could sustain the band as if it was our top priority. Some of us weren’t willing to make the sacrifices necessary at that point. Like, I knew I wanted a family, and I didn’t want to struggle to support them, or not see them. I didn’t want to be an absentee dad, and I’m okay with that decision. It’s not easy to sustain a career in any artistic endeavor. It requires a ton of energy, effort and sacrifice. I sometimes wonder how much easier my life would be if I didn’t even like music. But I love it! I can’t get away from it. It’ll always be in my life.BD: I came to Nashville to write the most music I could. I figured I’d never leave Nashville unless I quit music completely. But I realized that’s never going to happen. It’s always been there since I heard my first ever KISS record. It’s not even like, “music is life.” It’s just like, “music is us.” We’re never going to let go.LIP: Why is music important to you?JH: I teach English, and that’s what I did as my second career. I always tell my students…I don’t remember a time in my life when music didn’t do something strange, wonderful and all-consuming to me. Music has always been crucial. It’s impossible to answer because I literally can’t remember a time in my life when music didn’t move me or affect me. It’s always there. I’m not sure why. It just is.BD: I’m not sure how to answer this. It just is. The thought of giving up—not just trying to make it as a songwriter, just taking it out of my life—is impossible to consider. I would still walk around, or drive in my car, and music would pop in my head. And that’s where a lot of my stuff comes from. It’s inside of me.last_img read more

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Developer comment

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