Category: bkvvxtgt

Air Products, Debang Group partner to build £203m syngas facility in China

first_img Image: The new facility will supply syngas to support Debang Group’s 350,000 tons-per-year chemicals facilities. Photo: courtesy of LEEROY Agency from Pixabay. Air Products has form a joint venture (JV) with Debang Xinghua Technology to build, own and operate a new $250m (£202.8m) coal-to-syngas processing facility in Jiangsu Province, China.Planned to be built in Xuwei National Petrochemical Park, Lianyungang City, Jiangsu Province, the new coal-to-syngas processing facility is scheduled for commissioning in 2023.Air Products to own majority stake in new JVAir Products will own an 80% stake in the JV while Debang Group, a subsidiary of Jiangsu Debang Chemical Industrial Group, owns the remaining 20% interest.Air Products chairman, president, and CEO Seifi Ghasemi said: “This new project furthers our gasification growth strategy in the Xuwei National Petroleum Park—one of seven national integrated oil refining and petrochemical parks in China—while also creating new merchant supply capability for us to serve a high density manufacturing base in the region.“We are honored to form this JV with Debang Group to own and operate the gasification facilities and supply the syngas that will enable Debang Group to produce needed ammonia and other products for their customers.”The JV will own and operate the air separation unit, gasification and purification assets under a 20-year contract. The syngas will be supplied to support Debang Group’s 350,000 tonne-per-year chemicals facilities, as part of the deal.Debang Group chairman Zhao Xiang Hai said: “This project is an important action for Debang Group to follow ‘China’s East, Central, and West Regional Cooperation Demonstration Zone’ strategy, accelerate the pace of scientific and technological innovation, eliminate outdated production capacity, and build a competitive and innovative green chemical enterprise group.“This project received strong support from the municipal government and the Xuwei Park’s management committee, and we believe this is only the beginning. We look forward to our strong collaboration with Air Products to provide quality, value, and high efficiency through this strategic project.”Additionally, Air Products will serve as the exclusive purchaser of merchant liquid products from the JV facility.Last month, Air Products closed the acquisition of gasification business from General Electric (GE)’s business arm GE Power.The acquisition of its gasification business includes GE’s share in a 50/50 joint venture with China Shenhua Coal to Liquid and Chemical Company, a subsidiary of China Energy Group. The coal-to-syngas processing facility is planned to be built with an investment of £202.8m in Xuwei National Petrochemical Park in China last_img read more

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JFD to deliver DSRV for ROK Navy’s ASR-II

first_img“JFD first delivered a deep search and rescue system to the South Korean navy in 2009,” James Fisher and Sons CEO Nick Henry, said. “This additional capability further demonstrates our position of market leadership in the submarine rescue market, as well as the strong relationships that we build with our customers. navaltoday Authorities Share this article View post tag: ROK Navy JFD to deliver submarine rescue system for Korean Navy’s ASR-II ship View post tag: DSME View post tag: JFDcenter_img View post tag: ASR-II “The vehicle is a variation of the landmark third-generation vehicles recently delivered to the Indian Navy.” View post tag: DSRV Back to overview,Home naval-today JFD to deliver submarine rescue system for Korean Navy’s ASR-II ship UK-based underwater systems developer JFD has received a “multi-million pound” contract for the design and build of a deep search and rescue vehicle (DSRV) for the Republic of Korea Navy.The contract for the delivery of a DSRV for the ROK Navy’s new submarine rescue ship was awarded by South Korean shipbuilder Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering (DSME).The RoKN currently operates a multipurpose submarine rescue ship – the 103 m long, 4,300-tonne RoKS Cheonghaejin. Once in operation, the new ASR-II vessel will replace the current Cheonghaejin, in operation since 1996.The JFD-delivered DSRV will be launched and recovered from the submarine rescue vessel via a ‘moonpool’, through which the DSRV will be deployed to rescue the crews of distressed submarines at depths of up to 500m, and in waves as tall as four meters.This method of launch and recovery minimizes the impact of weather and sea states on the ability to operate the DSRV, maximizing the chances of a successful submarine rescue operation, further safeguarding the lives of submariners.Due to be delivered to the customer in 2021, the DSRV will undergo a comprehensive series of tests and trials including factory, harbor, and sea acceptance trials, before entering operational service. January 24, 2019, bylast_img read more

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Evansville’s Christmas on North Main Parade

first_imgThe 2015 Evansville Christmas on North Main Parade will be held on Sunday, November 22nd beginning at 2:30 pm. The parade will begin in the Civic Center parking lot. Visitors will also enjoy a “preview” of Ritzy’s Fantasy of Lights at the end of the parade.Pre-Parade activities will again include Santa’s Workshop held at SWIRCA, 16 W. Virginia Street. Festivities start at noon and continue until the start of the Parade. Activities include a petting zoo, arts & crafts by CMOEs Children Museum and of course clowns. There will be free hot chocolate, cookies and pictures with Santa for the first 1000 children. Children must be accompanied by an adult.The annual Christmas on North Main Parade is an event sponsored by the Jacobsville Area Community Corporation. This year, we’re proud to announce our Grand Marshall – 2015 Miss Indiana USA, Gretchen Reece whose hometown is North Vernon, IN.The Christmas on North Main Parade also includes local bands from area high schools as well as floats, clowns, cars, dignitaries, other marching and performing groups, a couple of surprises, and of course the main attraction…Santa!FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Menendez speaks out on Trump administration’s ending of temporary protection status…

first_img× Sen. Bob Menendez, senior member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, issued the following statement in reaction to the Trump Administration’s decision to sunset the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) designation for El Salvador.(Nearly 200,000 Salvadoran citizens – 6,800 Salvadorans in New Jersey are TPS holders and 3,900 U.S. born children in New Jersey have Salvadoran parents who are TPS holders – will be impacted by this decision, his office said.)“The Trump Administration is starting the year making it clear they will continue to be driven by nativist impulses that prevent them from taking into consideration concrete facts before making major policy changes to our immigration system,” he said. “As we repeatedly warned the White House in our calls for careful considerations for Temporary Protected Status designations, all one needs to do is take a look at the conditions on the ground in El Salvador to understand that ending this program and ordering the return of TPS holders will likely destabilize their fragile recovery efforts and put hundreds of thousands of individuals in harm’s way. Now, having their livelihoods and future endangered, over 200,000 law-abiding Salvadorans will be faced with the cruel decision of packing up their lives and tearing their family apart by self-deporting, or becoming undocumented and forced into the shadows of our society to avoid Trump’s deportation force. Likewise, tens of thousands of American children will also be terribly harmed by this decision as it seeks to strip them from their parents. “In dealing with an Administration blindly eager to depopulate our nation from law-abiding hard working immigrants at all costs, it is imperative that Congress understand its critical role to defend our moral standing as a nation and find a permanent solution for yet another entire community who will now be undocumented.”last_img read more

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Report HGCA Planting and Variety Crop Survey 2010

first_imgThe planting of wheat in Britain has increased in area by 10% compared to last year’s figures, according to the HGCA’s Planting and Variety Survey for the 2010 crop. Conducted by the Agriculture & Horticulture Development Board’s cereals and oilseeds team, it revealed wheat planting has risen from 1.803m hectares (ha) to 1.992m ha, with the Group 4 wheat variety now making up over half (51%) of the total wheat produced in the UK. Group 1 plantings, the varieties that produce consistent milling and baking performance, were up 1%, to 17% of total wheat plantings. However AHDB senior cereals and oilseeds analyst Michael Archer said Group 1 plantings were up by 10% in the south east. Group 3 plantings, which contain soft varieties for cake flours for example, were 4% down.”All regions have seen an increase in wheat area, encouraged by favourable planting conditions in autumn 2009,” commented AHDB cereals and oilseeds analyst Tosin Onikoyi.British barley has seen its lowest post-war plantings, having fallen 21% to 0.901m ha. It’s only the fourth time that the barley area has fallen below 1m ha in post-war times.The spring barley area fell by 26% to 0.540m ha, while winter barley dropped by 9% to 0.361m ha. Oats fell 5% to 0.123m ha, while oilseed rape plantings increased by 14% to 0.661m ha.last_img read more

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Tesco reports large fall in profits

first_imgTesco has announced a drop of nearly a quarter in its statutory profit before tax, the supermarket chain has revealed.Releasing its interim results today (2 October) for the 26 weeks ending 24 August 2013, Tesco’s overall group trading profits were down 8.8%, falling 12.4% in Asia (ex. China) and 70.8% in Europe. In the UK, group trading profits rose by 1.5%.Underlying profit before tax has fallen by 8.4%.Philip Clarke, chief executive, said: “Despite continuing challenges, we have made further progress on our strategic priorities. We are strengthening our UK business, working to establish multichannel leadership and pursuing disciplined international growth.”Clarke added that Tesco’s performance in the UK has been “strengthened” through this half, particularly in its food business.Today, Tesco has also announced a partnership with China Resources Enterprise Ltd. (CRE). Commenting on the union, Clarke said: “This, together with the conclusion of our strategic review in the United States, provides further evidence of our commitment to disciplined international growth and, more broadly, our approach to growth and returns.”Elsewhere, the supermarket chain reported in its UK food like-for-like had increased by 1% in the second quarter, and UK trading margin remained stable at 5.2%.last_img read more

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Charlie Pray: Profile of a Maine super utility infielder

first_imgCharles PrayBy Paul Mills In baseball they’re the most versatile players on the field: a standout who can typically play almost any defensive infield position: second base, shortstop, third base and sometimes even first base.The landscape of our governments – both state and federal – could not abide without them.Names like Elliot Richardson and George Shultz, who between the two of them in the 1970s and 1980s occupied eight different presidential cabinet positions, come to mind.At the state level, Maine has had the likes of David Stevens and Sawin Millett. In Stevens’ case it spanned the gamut from, first as town manager of several communities, then State Tax Assessor, Health and Welfare Commissioner, Highway and finally Turnpike Authority Czar, all in the space of a 55-year career that ended in 1987.For Millett, the game is by no means over yet. The 82-year old ranking GOP member of the influential legislative Appropriations Committee has a public service resume that stretches back over 50 years and includes cabinet positions for four different Maine governors.The capstone of the career of yet another utility infielder has also yet to be reached in the case of Charlie Pray, who holds the record as the longest serving Democrat to ever head up the Maine State Senate, its president for eight years in the mid 1980s to the early 1990s, in effect Maine’s lieutenant governor. Pray followed this up with 16 years in both the Clinton and Obama administrations including posts in energy and nuclear security. These positions book-ended his role as Maine’s Nuclear Safety Advisor during five years of the Baldacci administration.He’s presently doing double duty as executive director of the Maine County Commissioners Association and as town councilor in his home town of Millinocket. This Vietnam air force veteran at age 74 just last month demonstrated his own personal sustainability by putting in yet another run in the town’s annual celebrated half marathon race.Though Pray has certainly scaled the heights of both state and federal positions it’s to his beleaguered Millinocket – a town with now merely one third the property values and half the population it had two decades ago – that the dialogue in almost any conversation with Pray seems to return. When this columnist checked in with Pray just a few days ago, he extolled the recent breakthrough in efforts to re-boot the long dormant 1,400-acre Great Northern Paper mill location, once one of the leading employers in Maine but moribund the past 15 years.Likewise, ask the man who was for eight years a heartbeat away from being in the Blaine House and he points to what he did for the Millinocket area in that role as well. This was legislation Pray spearheaded that tied the hydropower system of the Penobscot River in this location to the mill site area itself. Otherwise, Pray reasoned, the owner would exploit the location to sell its power to the grid as opposed to keeping it on site for local development.Other key accomplishments Pray points to in his reign as senate president include establishing a screening system that addressed a medical malpractice insurance premium crisis. It’s been a fixture in the professional medical world in the nearly 30 years ever since its adoption.Clearly, another landmark was the government shutdown in his last term, one that put the brakes on state government for a record 17 days in July of 1991. The shutdown was orchestrated by GOP legislative leaders in an attempt to win concessions over rising workers compensation premiums. Pray and other Democrats including House Speaker John Martin were tasked with the dilemma of how to deal with what seemed like a hopelessly intractable situation. Though ultimately a compromise was brokered the episode contributed to the rise in bad feelings towards both political parties and among other things contributed not only to Pray’s defeat in 1992 but also to the election of an independent as governor, Angus King, in 1994.Long distance performer that Pray is, the setbacks of 1991 and 1992 by no means slowed down the forward movement of his marathon run in government. The same 1992 election that brought forth a Republican replacement for his state senate seat nevertheless saw the advent of the Democratic Clinton administration in Washington. Pray thus answered the call to become senior advisor in the US Department of Energy. In this position Pray not only drew upon his policy making role in the Penobscot River hydropower system but also on the contacts he had developed as a leader in the national lieutenant governor’s conference.On this job in Washington, Pray recalls that “I quickly found out the job of anybody like that is you get to tell everybody no.“ He was thus the man the White House delegated to deliver bad news to state governors, many of whom he had known when they like Pray had themselves been in second tier governmental leadership. When the Clinton administration was unable to address Chicago area power blackouts, for example, it was Pray who was given the task of breaking the bad news to the Illinois governor with whom Pray once served in the lieutenant governors association.Keynoting his service in the Obama administration was his post in the Nuclear Security Administration as its director of Congressional Affairs. There, Pray helped keep Congress abreast of the delicate work the agency was doing in collecting used nuclear weapons from the former Soviet Union countries and picking up nuclear waste from a host of third world countries.Back in Maine Pray’s expertise was put to use as a member of the state Land Use Planning Commission.When asked which of the many positions of public trust Pray has found most rewarding, he reports, “I’ve never had a position, job, employment I haven’t enjoyed because there is no ‘least’ in life. There’s only what you’ve done , what you’re doing and what opportunities arise next. Each one was a great experience.”A salient personal trait is Pray’s modesty. His staying power in a public career that has so far spanned four and a half decades – over five if one counts his years as an air force tactical air traffic controller in Thailand – may well be explained by this advice he gives to others, “Only half the lies about you are true and if somebody is saying something good about you, question them.”Given Pray’s continuing viability it is too early to write the epitaph of his career but if there ever is one this might well be a fitting reminder of how one survives as long as Pray has in the volatile world of public life today.Paul Mills is a Farmington attorney well known for his analyses and historical understanding of public affairs in Maine; he can be reached by e-mail [email protected]last_img read more

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Walter Kaiser dies

first_imgWalter Kaiser, Harvard’s Francis Lee Higginson Professor of English Literature and Professor of Comparative Literature Emeritus, died on Jan. 5.Born on May 31, 1931, in Bellevue, Ohio, the son of a grocer, Kaiser became a page in the U.S. Senate in 1944 and then won scholarships to Philips Academy, Andover, and Harvard, where he remained until retirement. While a student, he published several poems in The Harvard Advocate, and one in The New Yorker, in 1956. He graduated magna cum laude in 1954, received his Ph.D. in 1960, and was made professor of English and comparative literature in 1969. From 1988 to 2002 he served as director of Villa I Tatti, the Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies in Florence. His leadership profoundly shaped I Tatti, and he said those were among his happiest years; he always felt that he truly belonged to the northern Mediterranean, especially to Greece and Italy. He wrote often for The New York Review of Books and was an erudite teacher of Shakespeare.He is survived by two children, Miranda and David, three granddaughters, his brother, Bob, and many godchildren.Contributions in his memory may be made to the Walter Kaiser Fund for the Biblioteca Berenson at Villa I Tatti, Harvard University.last_img read more

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Course examining epidemics provides students with new perspective on COVID-19 pandemic

first_imgWe’ve all been living through a pandemic for months, but some students on campus are studying them, too.Laurel Daen, assistant professor of American Studies, is teaching a course this semester titled “Epidemics in America,” which meets over Zoom. The course covers illnesses from cholera, to smallpox, to HIV/AIDS and how they affected American life — relating the country’s storied past with disease to the current COVID-19 pandemic.Although campus may feel different this semester for many returning members of the Notre Dame community, it’s all Daen knows. This is her first semester teaching at the University.She first proposed the idea for a class on American epidemics while interviewing for the position over a year ago, she said. At the time, she planned to teach it in the spring.However, as COVID-19 spread globally and nationally and epidemics quickly became topical, Daen pushed for the class to take place this fall semester. Classes combine history with currents events, she said.“It’s really about bringing thinking about the history and culture of America both from centuries ago and the present day,” Daen said.Students do two readings for class. The first is historical, typically a primary source; the second is a contemporary news article that connects with the historical event, she said.“If we’re thinking about medical discrimination and early America, we’re also going to be talking about medical discrimination with COVID-19 today,” Daen said. “There’s lots of connections through the readings.”Junior Grace Scheidler and sophomore Martha Gluck are students in Daen’s class this semester. Both said they were struck by how many similarities COVID-19 has with prior epidemics, from leadership reaction to which groups are marginalized.“I feel like I’ve learned so much that was just left out of history books,” Gluck said. “I understand so much better how coronavirus works, but also how epidemics affect people in pretty much the same way, no matter the disease.”Daen said this realization is one of the main takeaways she hopes students get from the class.“If you’re thinking about the media today, or anything you read, so much of it is talking about how unprecedented the pandemic is,” she said. “But there’s actually a lot of precedent for it. And so by analyzing past events, I think it gives students not only better context, but also better skills for understanding the complexity of what’s going on today.”One aspect of the class that puts the current epidemic into perspective, Daen said, is a journal that students write in twice a week. Ideally, she said, it will be a primary source from this point in history, and at the end of the semester, the anonymized entries will be placed in an archive.Gluck said it’s interesting to look at her entries from earlier this semester and see what’s changed from then to now.“We’ve been going back and reflecting on our entries and, even though it’s only been two months, the change is so clear,” she said. “So much has happened, and it’s really cathartic to write it all down.”In fact, Gluck said her “Epidemics in America” work is the first thing she turns to as she sits down to study because she finds it so interesting.Amid readings, journals and lectures, Scheidler and Gluck both said the class is an engaging way to get perspective on the COVID-19 pandemic.It’s encouraging, Scheidler said, to know this isn’t the world turning upside down because so many things that shock us about life in a pandemic are typical of epidemics across America’s history.“I think something that we as a class have found is that there’s a lot of comfort in learning about these past epidemics,” Scheidler said. “You would think learning about smallpox and the Black Death would be depressing, but there’s a certain universality to the experience of confronting a disease as a society and not really being equipped to handle it that makes COVID-19 seem not as bad.”Daen said she was not expecting students to find the class hopeful — her classes, which typically focus on disease and disability, can often be heavy. But, she said, it was a welcome surprise that has made teaching the class all the more enjoyable.“The class is so relevant and so personal, because we’re all living through a pandemic, and thinking about this history has been a really powerful thing for the students and for me teaching it,” Daen said.Tags: American Studies, COVID-19, epidemics in america, zoomlast_img read more

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Covet This Stuff

first_imgThe best adventure hardware put to the test out in the field.1. Deuter ACT Lite 65+10There are no bells and whistles on this pack, but damn does it carry well. At 65 liters, plus a 10-liter extension, it was the perfect size for core backpacking—but it was the fit and feel that really impressed us on a four-day hiking trip. Once we cinched it down, we barely knew it was there when rock hopping and navigating tricky traverses, and the air-contact Lite ventilation system kept us dry and comfy without feeling like too much bulk on the back. $199; deuter.com2. Sierra Designs Zissou 30 Sleeping bag with DriDownThis bag has already won numerous awards from a host of outdoor publications and we will happily hop on the bandwagon. The 600-fill DriDown is real down, but it works even when wet, ideal for the Southeast where down is a logical choice but a huge bummer if it does get wet. $200; sierradesigns.com 3. BOA Beefy Split ShortsRunning shorts can be skimpy and awkward. Not the BOA split shorts, which provide plenty of coverage while still giving legs the freedom to spin. Featherlight and fast. $35; boa.com    4. Gerber Bear Gryllis KnifeThe world’s best-selling knife has a carbon stainless steel blade and features a firestarter built into the handle. It also includes a pommel at the knife base for hammering and an emergency whistle. The stout blade had no problem drilling fire holes in wood and cutting through thick rope. It’s the ultimate survival tool. Don’t leave home without it. $62; gerber.com 5. Big Agnes Fly Creek 2P Platinum UL Our first reaction when we picked up this ridunkulously light, 1-pound, 13-ounce tent was, “no way.” We were not sure if we could trust it on a serious trip. But we packed it for a weekend A.T. hike, and we were absolutely shocked how well it survived nasty gusts atop the Roan balds. Even better, we got rid of the tent itself and used it in tarp and ground cover mode for a hard-charging expedition up a 6,000-foot peak. $500; bigagnes.com 6. Petzl NeoIt won’t be on store shelves until July, but we were lucky enough to test Petzl’s much heralded USB-rechargable-power headlamp in caves and camp this spring. It comes complete with a sensor that powers the LEDs according to how much light you need, so we didn’t blind our buddies in camp but were able to peer into the darkest recesses  underground. $175; petzl.com7. Native Eyewear EndoThese shades became our go-to eyewear for everything from fly fishing to chasing our racer buddies on mountain bike rides to slogging a big backpack up the steep trail to Mitchell. The key was ventilation above the interchangable lenses that truly stopped fogging. $109–$129; nativeeyewear.com8. Patagonia AdvocateThe slip-ons are durable and conveniently clip to a pack for storage on the go. Leaving a light footprint, a 20 percent recycled EVA footbed and sole offers comfort and support as well as ample grip. $45; patagonia.com 9. Scarpa SparkThe perfect trail runner is light enough to save energy, yet sturdy enough to endure the sharp rocks and hard landings of the trail. Meet the 9.5-ounce Spark, which combines the best aspects of runner and scrambler. $115; scarpa.comUse this gear on your next road trip, and here is our road trip guide to get you there!last_img read more

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