Category: xqvmwuqu

Vincent’s Club elects first female president

first_imgVincent’s Club, the 155-year-old sports club known as ‘Vinnie’s’, has elected its first female president.Sophie Taylor, a medicine student at St Catherine’s College, will step into the role next term following Tuesday night’s elections.Taylor saw off three other presidential candidates – although the full election results remain confidential.Vinnie’s, which was established in 1863, has a membership made up largely – but not exclusively – of Blues sportsmen and women.It is based just off the High Street, at 1A King Edward’s Street.The club has only admitted female members since 2016.In 2015, the club’s members voted in favour of removing the word ‘male’ from its constitution, and thus admitting female members, but failed to reach the necessary two-thirds majority.A year later, however, some 85 per cent of members voted in favour of the change.Previously, to access the Vinnie’s clubhouse, a female student – or any other non-member – had to be invited as the guest of a member.Taylor won her full Blue in 2016 as part of the women’s hockey side that beat Cambridge, and captained the women’s cricket Blues throughout the summer of 2017.Outgoing president Ronan Llyr said that Taylor’s election represented “a historic moment for Vincent’s”.“Sophie was the events secretary on the committee this year, a role which she carried out in a truly exemplary manner,” he said.“I have every confidence in Sophie and look forward to offering my full support to her over the coming year.”Taylor chose not to comment on her election.last_img read more

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INDIANA PACERS WILL TAKE ON MILWAUKEE BUCKS OCTOBER 12 AT FORD CENTER

first_imgOCTOBER 12TH- FORD CENTEREvansville, IN – VenuWorks and Old National are teaming up to host the first National Basketball Association game at FordCenter October 12th, featuring Central Division rivals Indiana Pacers and Milwaukee Bucks. Game time is 6:35 p.m. CST.The Pacers’ roster features USA Olympian and NBA All-Star Paul George, rising star Myles Turner and recently acquired point guard Jeff Teague, an Indianapolis native. The Pacers are led by new head coach Nate McMillan. The young Bucks are coached by Jason Kidd.“I think it’s great any time we can take our team to different parts of the state and let our fans in these areas see us in person,” said Pacers President of Basketball Operations Larry Bird. “We take pride in being the ‘Indiana’ Pacers and look forward to going to Evansville. We think the fans there will like our team and our opponent, Milwaukee, is one of the young, talented teams that could be a playoff team this season.”Tickets will go on sale Friday, August 19 at 10 a.m. CST and $1 from every ticket will be donated to the Boys & Girls Club of Evansville. VENUWORKS AND OLD NATIONAL PRESENT:INDIANA PACERSVSMILWAUKEE BUCKS FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Competition class

first_imgA series of demonstrations and workshops in Leeds aims to help students prepare for up-coming bakery competitions. The National Federation of Bakery Students’ Societies/IBB Alliance is holding an Exhibition Standard School on Friday, February 10, from 8.30am to 5pm, and Saturday, February 11, 2006 from 8.30am to 3pm. The weekend is designed to help and encourage students and others into competition work ahead of the Alliance’s conference at the end of April.Held at Thomas Danby College in Leeds, the weekend includes a series of full-day and half-day workshops. Topics on the Friday include competition bread, Hovis and Granary bread, and chocolate work. Half-day sessions include fruitcake and Swiss roll demonstrations, an ‘innovation’ bread workshop and marzipan modelling.Half-day classes on the Saturday include a dough modelling demonstration and workshop, a brush embroidery workshop, a fondant and gateaux workshop and a morning goods demonstration. The sessions on Saturday will end with feedback and a raffle. Among the tutors are John Costello for chocolate work, Paul Radford for the fruitcake and Swiss roll session, Sue Haskell for marzipan modelling and brush embroidery, and Maureen Dempsey for fondant and gateaux. Delegates are requested to bring their own whites and book their own accommodation. Coffee and pastries, lunch, and a buffet and disco on the Friday evening are all included in the price, which is £20 for Alliance members and £35 for non-members, which includes full membership. Cheques should be made payable to NFBSS/IBB Weekend School.For more information please contact Karen O’Brien, tel: 01204 574854; or email [email protected] What’s on at a glance- Competition bread- Hovis and Granary bread- Fruitcake and Swiss rolls- Chocolate work- Marzipan modellinglast_img read more

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Holland’s Pies, Pork Farms and Mrs Crimble’s unveil NPD

first_imgSource: PidyQuiche Cases, PidyThe ready-to-fill pastry specialist has launched two quiche cases.Made with an all-butter pressed puff pastry, the quiche cases are available in 11cm or 18cm.Both sizes are suitable for making quiches, pies and sweet tartlets, said the firm, which added that the texture stays crisp several days after filling.With operators running kitchens with reduced stuff due to Covid-19, they can save valuable time and ensure consistency across the board, it added.“The two sizes also offer complete flexibility across menus. The products hold up extremely well to moisture and can be easily transported for outlets offering takeaway or delivery services,” said Fabien Levet, commercial manager at Pidy UK. Source: Pan’ArtisanMini Dough Bites, Pan’ArtisanManufactured in Italy, Pan’Artisan’s Mini Dough Bites comprise small balls of part-baked dough.The quick serve dough bites address the demand for small dishes, sharing options and snack size portions, it said.Its ‘authentic’ production process creates a slight variation in individual size for a handmade rustic appearance, it added. They are available in a box of 458.Being frozen and part-baked, the dough bites can be ready to serve in under four minutes from frozen, in 2 ½ minutes if cooking after defrosting, and in five to six minutes when garlic butter is added. Source: Holland’s PiesFamily Pie, Holland’s PiesHolland’s Pies has unveiled a range of frozen and chilled Family Pies.The 650g pies comprise Potato & Meat, Minced Beef & Onion, and Vegetarian Society Approved Cheese & Onion.At an rsp of £3.50 in chilled and £3.20 in frozen, the pies are made with a crumbly shortcrust pastry, Wyke Farm’s creamy mature Cheddar cheese and British sourced meat.They contain no preservatives, MSG, artificial colours and flavours, or hydrogenated fats, Holland’s said.“As the nation’s bestseller of Potato & Meat, Cheese & Onion and Minced Beef & Onion frozen pies, this new trio of Family Pies is an exciting addition to the Holland’s pie range. Whilst tapping into the growing family meal occasion, as a result of Covid-19, this new Family Pie offering adds new and different flavour profiles to the category,” said Leanne Holcroft, brand manager for Holland’s Pies.The Family Pie range is available now in select Morrisons, Asda and Tesco stores. The frozen range will roll out in select Iceland stores on 23 November, followed by Tesco on 7 December.In September, Pukka also expanded its range with Just For Two pies designed for sharing. Source: Pork FarmsPorkless Pork Pie, Pork Farms Pork Farms has developed its first Porkless Pork Pie, which features a plant-based meat replacement filling.The vegan pie contains pea protein, a natural protein with nutrients and amino acids, encased in a hot water crust pastry with seasoning.It is available now in selected Asda stores across the UK.The Porkless Pork Pie has been developed to meet the demand for flexitarian friendly options, said the firm.“We’re incredibly excited to be just one of only a few brands to introduce pea protein to our product range. There’s currently a growing demand in the market for meat replacement pastry products and, with flexitarianism continuing to gain popularity, it is clear that the demand for alternative protein products is not just a passing trend,” added Mike Holton, brand manager at Pork Farms.center_img Source: Mrs Crimble’sVegan Coconut Macaroons, Mrs Crimble’sThe gluten-free brand is set to extend its vegan range with Vegan Coconut Macaroons.It follows last year’s launch of its first vegan macaroons, Vegan Choc Macaroons, to offer an alternative flavour to the growing number of vegan customers, said the firm.The Vegan Coconut Macaroons offer a rich and fresh flavour profile with hints of tropical coconut, it added.The gluten-free macaroons are come in a six-serving pack and contain 133kcal per macaroon. They will roll out in Tesco on 23 October.“As more customers seek vegan alternatives to their favourite cakes, we are proud to launch a vegan option of our Coconut Macaroons. With Mrs Crimble’s vegan line driving incremental sales, the vegan market will continue to be a focus area for the brand,” added Bryan Martins, marketing and category director at Wessanen UK, owner of Mrs Crimble’s. Source: Mrs Crimble’sHolland’s Pies, Pork Farms and Mrs Crimble’s are among the bakery brands to launch new products.Alongside Pan’Artisan and Pidy, the businesses have expanded their bakery ranges with the likes of vegan macaroons, pork-less pies and mini dough bites.Here are the latest products making waves in the bakery industry:last_img read more

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Marcus King Band Postpones 2019 European Summer Tour Dates

first_imgThe Marcus King Band has announced the postponement of its 2019 European tour dates, which were scheduled to begin on June 10th and continue throughout the early summer month. The rock band led by guitarist Marcus King continues to tour heavily in the ongoing promotion of their latest studio album, 2018’s Carolina Confessions.Related: The Marcus King Band Performs “Goodbye Carolina” On ‘The Late Show With Stephen Colbert’ The band took to its Instagram early Monday afternoon to share the disappointing news for the fans overseas. Read the entire statement below. The announcement of the tour’s cancelation comes as King and his band prepare for their three-night run at New York City’s Brooklyn Bowl beginning on Wednesday. Over the last few weeks, King’s ongoing tour has featured a mix of notable sit-ins and live collaborations with bands like Dark Star Orchestra, Billie Strings, Dumpstaphunk, Gary Clark Jr., and Widespread Panic. King’s tour is set to continue well into the summer months with scheduled appearances at California’s High Sierra Music Festival and West Virginia’s 4848 Festival next month.The Marcus King Band is also set to link up with Chris Stapleton on the country-rock guitarist’s All American Road Show Tour beginning on July 9th in Allentown, PA.Head to King’s website for an updated listing of 2019 tour dates and ticket info.last_img read more

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What the future of education looks like from here

first_img Read Full Story After a year that involved a global pandemic, school closures, nationwide remote instruction, protests for racial justice, and an election, the role of education has never been more critical or more uncertain. When the dust settles from this year, what will education look like — and what should it aspire to?To mark the end of its centennial year, HGSE convened a faculty-led discussion to explore those questions. The Future of Education panel, moderated by Dean Bridget Long and hosted by HGSE’s Askwith Forums, focused on hopes for education going forward, as well as HGSE’s role. “The story of HGSE is the story of pivotal decisions, meeting challenges, and tremendous growth,” Long said. “We have a long history of empowering our students and partners to be innovators in a constantly changing world. And that is needed now more than ever.”Joining Long were Senior Lecturer Jennifer Cheatham, Assistant Professor Anthony Jack, Associate Professor Karen Brennan, and Professors Adriana Umaña-Taylor and Martin West, as they looked forward to what the future could hold for schools, educators, and communities.The pandemic heightened existing gaps and disparities and exposed a need to rethink how systems leaders design schools, instruction, and who they put at the center of that design.“As a leader, in the years before the pandemic hit, I realized the balance of our work as practitioners was off,” Cheatham said. “If we had been spending time knowing our children and our staff and designing schools for them, we might not be feeling the pain in the way we are. I think we’re learning something about what the real work of school is about.”In the coming years, the panelists hope that a widespread push to recognize the identity and health of the whole-child in K–12 and higher education will help educators design support systems that can reduce inequity on multiple levels.However, as much as the pandemic isolated individuals, on the global scale, people have looked to connect with each other to find solutions and share ideas as they faced a common challenge. This year may have brought everyone together and allowed for exchange of ideas, policies, practices, and assessments across boundaries.As educators and leaders create, design, and imagine the future, technology should be used in service of that vision rather than dictating it. As technology becomes a major part of how we communicate and share ideas, educators need to think critically about how to deploy technology strategically.“My stance on technology is that it should always be used in the service of our human purpose and interest,” said Brennan. “We’ve talked about racial equity, building relationships. Our values and purposes and goals need to lead the way, not the tech.”last_img read more

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Solving the challenge of legacy applications in the cloud

first_imgAs more enterprises in more industries turn to cloud solutions, we are seeing an increase in certain kinds of challenges. One that is particularly interesting involves moving legacy applications to a cloud environment.The challenge of legacy applications gets to the heart of some of the key differences between a cloud solution and traditional solution. One great advantage of the cloud is that it disconnects the dependency between this specific application and that specific hardware. In the cloud, applications usually do not live or die because of a specific piece of hardware.The role of hardwareHowever, legacy applications actually can live or die because of a specific piece of hardware. Pre-cloud, the way you met the demand for application reliability and availability was, in no small part, by running the application on reliable hardware. If you had a mission-critical application, you would turn to best-in-breed server hardware. Similarly, you would design in redundancy through redundant power feeds, redundant server power supplies, multiple network interfaces and redundant switch infrastructure.The focus on using only the highest-quality physical components does not apply in public cloud environments. Public cloud is built on low-cost commodity hardware, designed with the fault domain at the rack level, with the expectation that all servers in a single rack will and do fail. The availability/reliability strategy for public cloud is to address redundancy at the software level.Cloud native applicationsCloud native applications do not rely on hardware for their reliability and availability. Instead, they typically have many instances running on many servers. The instances may be spread across the public cloud provider’s data center or even across multiple regional data centers, so cloud-native applications handle scale very well, by design. This is in sharp contrast to legacy applications, which are usually single-instance and expect the underlying hardware platform to be resilient.Therein lies the problem. A legacy application relies on hardware for reliability and availability, but the cloud disconnects software from hardware, leaving a significant gap. In fact, many public cloud providers will not provide a Service Level Agreement (SLA) for a single-instance application, since their ability to meet SLAs relies on their ability to leverage multiple instances for redundancy.A range of optionsIf you have a legacy application you want to move to the cloud, what’s the best way to proceed? Should you accept not having an SLA, and focus on being able to bring your application back up as quickly as possible if it fails? Should you reconfigure the application with an architecture for public cloud, or even redevelop the legacy application completely to work with a public cloud?These options aren’t without downsides. If you can live without an SLA, doing so might be a suitable alternative, provided you can tweak things enough to get the recovery time inside an acceptable recovery window.Similarly, if you don’t need web scale, then keeping your application’s traditional architecture, with a few tweaks for cloud-enablement, might suffice. The issue with traditional legacy application architecture is that it often transfers poorly to the cloud. Completely redeveloping the legacy application for the cloud will address most issues. However, unless you specifically need the scalability of cloud-native applications the cost of redevelopment can make it difficult to achieve a reasonably timely ROI.Dell Services can helpAt Dell Cloud Services we help our customers overcome challenges like this every day. With legacy applications, we meet the challenge head-on. For example, we can simply move your application directly into Dell Cloud Dedicated Service — Dell’s hosted private cloud. The critical difference with this choice is we do provide an SLA, even for your single-instance application. We can perform the migration live to avoid downtime. We also provide security above the hypervisor, for additional peace of mind. You get the benefits of a stable, secure private cloud environment with the protection of an SLA, without the expense of modifying your legacy application.If you are facing a legacy application, we look forward to hearing from you. Visit www.Dell.com/cloudservices, or contact a Dell Cloud Specialist to learn more.last_img read more

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Odds & Ends: A Broadway Baby for Stephanie J. Block & Sebastian Arcelus & More

first_img A Broadway Baby for Stephanie J. Block & Sebastian Arcelus This is wicked good news for a former Elphaba! Broadway.com has confirmed that Tony nominee Stephanie J. Block is expecting her first child with her hubby, fellow Great White Way alum Sebastian Arcelus. Block told us late last year that: “I love caring for a home and a yard, and hopefully sooner than later, a little family, with little Block-Arceluses.” Huge congrats to them both! Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today. Stage Adaptation of Denzel Washington Movie Devil in a Blue Dress Aiming for Broadway You might remember Devil in a Blue Dress as a 1995 movie starring Tony winner Denzel Washington and Don Cheadle. Well now, Walter Mosley, whose novel the film was adapted from, has revealed that a stage version is aiming for the Great White Way within the next year. Eurweb reports that Mosley is working with composer and Jazz musician Branford Marsalis on the project. No word yet on dates, theater…or casting. Stephanie J. Block Sebastian Arcelus Star Files Roger Allam Will Star in Theresa Rebeck’s Seminar in London Roger Allam will star in Theresa Rebeck’s Seminar at London’s Hampstead Theatre. The Olivier winner will play Leonard, a role performed by Alan Rickman and then Jeff Goldblum when the show ran on Broadway from November 2011 to May 2012. Directed by Terry Johnson, the production will begin previews on September 25 and play a limited engagement through October 18. Opening night is set for October 1. China’s $323 Million Boost to Musical Theater Tuners are still comparatively not that big of a thing in China, but a $323 million musical production center, currently under construction just outside Beijing, could change that. According to The Hollywood Reporter, the one million square foot compound will be completed in 2017, although the first production at the venue will be Stephen Sondheim’s Into the Woods later this year. We need to pay a visit! View Commentslast_img read more

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Brazil Promotes Cyberthreat Information Sharing

first_imgBy Andréa Barreto / Diálogo June 25, 2019 NATO uses software that the Brazilian Cyber Defense Command selected and will be implemented jointly in 10 partner nations. A strategic tool for cyber protection is currently undergoing the testing phase. The Malware Information Sharing Platform (MISP) is an online tool used to share information on virtual threats. Member nations of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization already use the software that will be implemented in Brazil and nine other countries under the Ibero-American Cyber Defense Forum. “This is a very important tool that allows for information exchange, for instance, about a specific cyber device, a virus, identified in a certain network,” said Brazilian Army (EB, in Portuguese) Lieutenant Colonel Walbery Nogueira de Lima e Silva, a Cyber Defense Command (ComDCiber) General Staff officer. “We can share its characteristics, its use, and how to update software to prevent a virus from activating and working, etc.” ComDCiber is a joint command, part of the EB structure, operating as a central agency of the military cyber defense system. The institution was responsible for coordinating the III Ibero-American Cyber Defense Forum, in Brasília, April 15-17, 2019. About 30 representatives from the cyber sector of Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, Portugal, Spain, Uruguay, and Brazil participated. An agreement on the use of MISP was among the outcomes of the meeting. The agreement was recorded in the letter of intent members of the forum signed at the conclusion of the event. “We are in the planning phase, defining conditions for the tool’s use in each country. We will then move into the implementation phase, followed by the information sharing phase,” said Lt. Col. Walbery, adding that the go-live date for MISP has yet to be determined. Doctrine, training, and education The Ibero-American Cyber Defense Forum was established in 2016 to share experiences between the armed forces of partner nations and to strengthen combat initiatives in the cyberthreat field. The first forum was held in Spain in 2016, and the second edition took place in Argentina, in 2018. Chile will be the host country for the April 2020 event. Meanwhile, EB Lieutenant General Guido Amin Naves, head of ComDCiber, serves as the forum pro tempore secretary. As such, Brazil oversees the agenda participants of the forum created. The schedule includes recurrent video conferences to execute agreements made during this year’s meeting. At the three-day event, service members discussed doctrine matters to facilitate the development of joint cyber operations. They also addressed training, with a special focus on two exercises: the Ibero-American Cyber Defense Forum Exercise II and Cyber Guardian 2.0. The first exercise is directly related to the forum, with the participation of all 10 countries, but the date has yet to be determined. The second is a training coordinated by ComDCiber. The event will take place in July, in Brasília, and was conducted for the first time in 2018. Members of the forum were invited to participate as visitors. The Cyber Guardian exercise brings service members and civilians together to encourage the development of collaborative solutions to promote cyber protection. “Cybernetics has the characteristic of viewing society as a whole, regardless of physical borders. In this sense, ComDCiber considers the increase of collaborative action, which involves gathering the government, defense, private sector, and academic community in a national effort for cyber protection, as being highly important,” Lt. Col. Walbery said. Education was also a topic at the forum. Participants shared ideas on exchange, internship, and course attendance among member countries. The National Cyber Defense School in Brazil, for instance, offers periodic courses. The institution, founded in February 2019, is temporarily located at ComDCiber and will eventually have its own headquarters. The school started operations before its official inauguration, and has already trained 1,200 people through various courses. “Our goal is to train people to operate complex systems,” said EB Colonel Edson Ribeiro dos Santos Junior, a ComDCiber General Staff officer.last_img read more

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Supreme Court hears DNA testing arguments

first_imgSupreme Court hears DNA testing arguments Supreme Court hears DNA testing arguments Mark D. Killian Managing EditorTrying to reconcile a proposed criminal procedural rule on DNA testing for inmates with a recent state law, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments August 28. A majority of the debate centered around whether the law — which allows only those tried and found guilty to seek exoneration or a sentence reduction through DNA evidence — should also be applied to inmates who plead guilty or nolo contendere. Those representing public defender groups also objected to a provision in both the proposed rule and statute that allows prisoners to seek a DNA evidence review only two years after they are convicted or after new testing procedures are developed. Eighteenth Circuit Judge O.H. Eaton, Jr., chair of the Bar’s Criminal Procedures Rules Committee — which drafted the proposed rule — said the problem with the state law, Ch. 2001-97 (SB 366), is that it only affects those who were found guilty and not those who entered a plea. He said that has implications for the court’s habeas corpus powers. While not appearing at oral argument, House Speaker Tom Feeney, R-Oviedo, did file a brief with the court stating that the proposed rule’s expansion of “substantive grounds” authorizing DNA testing for those who plead guilty or no contest “would violate the separation of powers provision of the Florida Constitution.” “To the extent that the rule and SB 366 authorizes defendants to seek DNA testing in cases where their opportunity to seek DNA testing under existing law has already passed, the granting of additional rights to these same defendants enabling them to pursue those claims which would otherwise be barred is substantive in nature and cannot be reasonably construed to be procedural,” Feeney said. “Likewise, the use of DNA evidence to mitigate lawful sentences is a legislative creation of a new substantive right. The legislature therefore is not limiting a matter of procedure, and is well within its rights to ‘limit’ substantive rights that they, and they alone, have the authority to create.” Judge Eaton, however, said the constitution gives the court the right to issue habeas corpus writs and the legislature “has no business trying to curtail that right.” “There have been arguments that claim that what this rule does is to try to expand the statute, and I suggest that expansion vs. curtailment is where we ought to be talking,” Eaton told the justices. “What the statute does is curtail this court’s right to issue writs of habeas corpus. This rule does not expand that right; the rule simply states it.” Robert Willis, a former chair of the Criminal Procedures Rules Committee and an assistant public defender from Ft. Lauderdale, said to limit the DNA testing remedy only to cases where a trial has occurred, may have an “inhibiting impact” on future plea negotiations. “What would I advise my client to do in the future?” Willis asked. “I’d say, ‘You’d better go to trial because if science comes along with a remedy, I would not be able to make use of it.’” Justice Leander Shaw, however, asked if the court had the authority to extend the pool of those who could use the law. “The position of the rules committee from the beginning was that under the habeas corpus powers of this court it could address this issue, and that basically the rule that would be adopted would be stating the habeas corpus powers of this court,” Willis said. “We went back and used the statute as the starting point, but we fundamentally believed that all of these cases should be included.” Barry Scheck, a DNA expert and director of the Innocence Project in New York, said there have been 94 postconviction DNA exonerations in the U.S., including 11 persons who were on death row, two of whom were in Florida – Frank Lee Smith and Jerry Frank Townsend. “Given the way the proposed rule is structured, neither of these individuals would have had the opportunity to get relief because of the two-year time limit,” Scheck said, adding that because of the guilty-plea provision, Townsend, who has an IQ of 50, would have been denied an opportunity to get the DNA test. Townsend spent 22 years on death row after pleading guilty to murder before DNA testing recently cleared him. Scheck also said there are others across the nation who have pled guilty in order to avoid the death penalty, who have since been exonerated by DNA tests. Chief Justice Charles Wells asked if other states have time-limited DNA rules. Scheck said 22 states now have postconviction DNA statutes, and 16 of those have no time limits whatsoever. “We’ve done most of the postconviction DNA tests in the United States, and nine years of experience has shown. . . by the time someone tries to find a transcript, the police reports, the lab reports, to make an application under the statute to show a DNA test would raise a reasonable portability they were wrongly convicted and sentenced, certainly two years have passed,” Scheck said. “The average time period in our cases approached three to four years for us to get an application out.” Buddy Jacobs, general counsel of the Florida Prosecuting Attorneys Association, opposed calls to open the DNA testing to those who plead guilty, saying the same argument was already raised and rejected by the legislature. He also said those who plead guilty do so under oath and the state takes those pleas seriously. “On behalf of the state attorneys, we submit to you that the pool should not be expanded,” Jacobs said. “We think it makes our system, at best, disingenuous, and it is a thing that has been debated by the legislature, and we hope you do not expand that.” But Justice Shaw asked that if the state’s “bottom-line policy” is that innocent people should not be kept in jail, why shouldn’t a person who has entered a nolo plea “under pressure and are in fact innocent and can be proven innocent by DNA” be excepted? “Doesn’t that go against our policy, our principle, justice, and everything else?” Shaw asked. Jacobs said lawyers have a duty not to allow innocent people to plead guilty, and judges have a duty not to accept guilty pleas in “cases like that.” Carolyn Snurkowski of the Attorney General’s office said allowing those who plead their case to seek exoneration through DNA evidence would bring into question the validity of guilty pleas in this state “if, in fact, you are ascertaining that a large number of individuals are in fact innocent, and they have pled guilty or nolo contendere.” “If you really look at the notion of nolo contendere, the individual is not saying ‘I’m guilty.’ He is saying, ‘I cannot prove I’m innocent,’ and in that sense we have always accepted the notion that nolo contendere pleas are based on a number of reasons, and we don’t question the defendant with regard to why he is in fact engaging in that,” Snurkowski said. “That is not to say the state is standing up here before the court and suggesting anyone who is innocent should be incarcerated.” Other differences between the proposed rule and the statute include: • Subdivision (c)(7) provides for FDLE (or its designee) to conduct the testing, but also authorizes the trial court, upon a showing of good cause, to order testing by another laboratory or agency. The rules committee was of the opinion that the trial court has that inherent authority and that there may be cases in which testing by FDLE would be suspect. Additionally, in non-indigent cases, private counsel may prefer testing to be done by an independent laboratory. The committee said that provision also satisfies legislative concern that FDLE may not be able to absorb the number of cases expected by that agency. • The proposed rule, in subdivision (d)(B)(2), provides that a motion for postconviction relief based solely on the results of court-ordered DNA testing may not be subject to the time limitations in Fla. R. Crim. P. 3.850-3.851 and may not be considered a “successive motion.” The legislation does not contain a similar provision. • The proposed rule contains a provision that tolls the time for filing a notice of appeal if a motion for rehearing is filed. The legislation does not contain a similar provision. September 15, 2001 Managing Editor Regular Newslast_img read more

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