Category: octvpcjc

Utah State Men’s Basketball Visits San Diego State

first_img Tags: Devin Watson/Jalen McDaniels/Mountain West Conference/Neemias Queta/Sam Merrill/San Diego State Men’s Basketball/Utah State Men’s Basketball/Viejas Arena The Aggies have won their last seven games, their longest such winning streak since joining the Mountain West Conference. Written by Utah State has also earned six road wins thus far this season, their most since the 2014-15 season. The Aggies shoot a conference-best 48 percent from the field and in turn only allow opponents to shoot 38.7 percent from the field. The Aggies are seeking their initial win against San Diego State since joining the Mountain West Conference. Redshirt sophomore forward Jalen McDaniels (17.1 points, 8.5 rebounds per game) and senior guard Devin Watson (15.8 points per game) lead the Aztecs. FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSAN DIEGO-Saturday, Utah State men’s basketball, currently sporting a record of 18-5 (8-2 in Mountain West play) visits Viejas Arena to battle the San Diego State Aztecs (13-9, 5-4 in Mountain West play). In his last five games, Queta is averaging 13 points, 13 rebounds and 3.2 blocks per game.center_img The Aztecs score 75.1 points per game and surrender 69.5 points per contest. Freshman Portuguese national center Neemias Queta currently averages 11.1 points and 9.1 rebounds per game. The Aztecs lead the Aggies 10-3 all-time and have won 10 straight in the series. Utah State scores 79.9 points per game and surrenders only 66.5 points per contest. Junior guard Sam Merrill averages 19.4 points per game, keeping him as the Aggies’ leading scorer. February 8, 2019 /Sports News – Local Utah State Men’s Basketball Visits San Diego State Brad Jameslast_img read more

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Chief, Pediatric Orthopaedics (62697)

first_imgThe University of Florida Department of Orthopaedics andRehabilitation is currently recruiting for a board certified orboard eligible Pediatric Orthopaedics Chief to join our dynamicteam. The University has recently partnered with the Shriner’sHospital for Children to develop a comprehensive pediatricorthopedic program in north central Florida. This full-time facultyposition is available on a non-tenure accruing track at the rank ofClinical Associate Professor or Clinical Professor.Responsibilities include patient care, teaching, research andadministration.The successful finalist would ideally have a subspecialty interestin one or more of the following: pediatric spine, pediatric lowerextremity conditions, trauma and/or neuromuscular diseases inaddition to general pediatrics. Outstanding academic and researchsupport are provided.Salary and faculty rank will be commensurate with experience andacademic qualifications. Applicants must have completed anOrthopaedic Residency and one year or more in a PediatricOrthopaedic Fellowship and be Board Certified/Board Eligible.Finalist must obtain an unrestricted Florida Medical License.Interested applicants should upload a cover letter, curriculumvitae, and three references.Review of applications will begin immediately and will continueuntil a suitable applicant pool has been established.Selected candidate will be required to provide an officialtranscript to the hiring department upon hire. A transcript willnot be considered “official” if a designation of “Issued toStudent” is visible. Degrees earned from an educational institutionoutside of the United States are required to be evaluated by aprofessional credential service provider approved by NationalAssociation of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES).If an accommodation due to a disability is needed to apply for thisposition, please call 352-392-2477 or the Florida Relay System at800-955-8771(TDD). Hiring is contingent upon eligibility to work inthe US. Searches are conducted in accordance with Florida’sSunshine Law.#category=35The University of Florida is committed to non-discrimination withrespect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex,sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, marital status,national origin, political opinions or affiliations, geneticinformation and veteran status in all aspects of employmentincluding recruitment, hiring, promotions, transfers, discipline,terminations, wage and salary administration, benefits, andtraining.last_img read more

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NILAN, CATHERINE M. (nee: Schilling)

first_imgCatherine passed away at home on April 27, 2017 in Berkeley Height, NJ. Catherine was born and raised in Bayonne and has been living in Berkeley Height for the past 6 years. Catherine was a retired registered Nurse for the Bayonne Hospital for over 40 years retiring in 1982. Wife of the late Lester T. Nilan. Mother of Thomas Nilan and his wife Elizabeth and Margaret Robertson and her husband Raymond. Grandmother of Michael Robertson, Jeffrey Robertson, Thomas Nilan, Christine Sorge and Jessica Jusefowytsch. Great-grandmother of Kirsten, Corey, Abby, Shawn, Colin, Emily and Ryan. Sister of the late Rose Kurt, Mary Tamasik, Sister Alice Schilling S.S.J. and John Schilling. Sister-in-law of Agnes Schilling. Funeral arrangements by G. KEENEN O’BRIEN Funeral Home, 984 Avenue C.last_img read more

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Holiday Book Sale at O.C. Library

first_imgCurbside pickup continues at the Ocean City Free Public Library. The Friends and Volunteers of the Ocean City Free Public Library announced the December Holiday Book Sale.The sale will be held in the atrium of the library, 1735 Simpson Ave., on Friday, Dec. 13, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Saturday, Dec. 14, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Shop for books, audiobooks and more as great holiday gifts.For more information visit www.friendsvolunteersocfpl.comlast_img

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New Food Pantry Map provides 40+ locations for St. Joseph County residents

first_img Facebook Twitter TAGSenFocusfoodFood Access CouncilIndianamappantrySt. Joseph County WhatsApp Facebook Google+ IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market Pinterest WhatsAppcenter_img New Food Pantry Map provides 40+ locations for St. Joseph County residents Twitter Pinterest By Brooklyne Beatty – August 27, 2020 0 888 Google+ Hunger Taskforce Wednesday, March 3, 2010, in Milwaukee. ( Photo/Darren Hauck) Locating a nearby food pantry has never been easier for St. Joseph County residents.The St. Joseph County Food Access Council teamed up with local non-profit enFocus to develop an interactive Food Pantry Map of 40+ organizations serving residents in need.Prior to the pandemic, more than 13% of St. Joseph County residents were faced with food insecurity. Demand has since increased in the wake of COVID-19.The Food Pantry Map provides the locations, days of week and hours of operation for more than 40 local food pantries. It also provides details on eligibility for services from participating organizations.The Food Pantry Map can be found by clicking here or on the SJC Food Access Council website.The St. Joseph County Health Department and community organizations will also be distributing pocket-sized printed versions to reach at-risk populations without digital access. Previous articleIndiana to remain at Stage 4.5 in Back On Track plan through Sep. 25Next articleOfficer hands out gun locks at child’s funeral to prevent future gun tragedies Brooklyne Beattylast_img read more

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Institute of Politics celebrates spring open house

first_img Read Full Story Harvard’s Institute of Politics (IOP) kicked off the spring 2016 semester with its biannual open house event. Undergraduates filled the halls of the JFK Jr. Forum at Harvard Kennedy School, looking to register for programming and catch a preview of the year to come.Students were greeted with patriotic decorations and tri-fold project boards, which detailed the finer points on all 14 IOP programs. IOP Student Advisory Committee (SAC) members, with red, white, and blue flair in stock, engaged the crowd, making pitches and sharing their enthusiasm for the new term. On a secondary stage toward the back of the hall, selfies were snapped with cardboard cutouts of every 2016 presidential candidate.In her opening remarks to the student body, IOP Director Maggie Williams said, “You do not have to be a government concentrator to feel at home at the IOP.” She went on to say, “Current IOP participants and alums span the range of concentrations – from music to mathematics; from pre-med to philosophy.” Invoking the mission of the institute, Williams closed by saying, “The IOP is a gift to you. It is a gift to everyone interested in politics.”last_img read more

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A step forward in DNA base editing

first_img <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-DoFALYv7X4″ rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/-DoFALYv7X4/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Rwft3tairE” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/4Rwft3tairE/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> The road that led to the adenine base editor required more than just evolving the starting material. After a year of work and several initial attempts that resulted in no detectable DNA editing of A•T base pairs, the team began to see the first glimmers of success, Liu said. Following three rounds of evolution and engineering, the adenine base editors were working deceptively well, until the team discovered that the system would only work on certain DNA sequences.“At that point we could have pulled the trigger and reported a base editor that works well only at certain sites, but we thought the sequence requirements would really limit its usefulness and discourage others from moving the project forward, so we went back to the well of evolution. We changed the selections to force a base editor that would process all sites, regardless of their sequence,” Liu said. “That was a tough call, because at that point we had been working well over a year on the project, and it was very exciting that we were seeing any base editing on A•T base pairs in DNA at all.”The team restarted its efforts with several additional rounds of evolution and engineering, now testing their adenine base editors against 17 genetic sequences that included all possible combinations of DNA bases surrounding the target A, Liu said. The final ABE7.10 variant edited sites with an average efficiency of 53 percent, and produced virtually no unwanted products.To demonstrate the adenine base editor’s potential, Liu and colleagues used ABE7.10 to correct a mutation that causes hereditary hemochromatosis in human cells. They also used ABE7.10 to install a mutation in human cells that suppresses a disease, recreating the so-called “British mutation” found in healthy individuals who would normally develop blood diseases like sickle cell anemia. The mutation instead causes fetal hemoglobin genes to remain active after birth, protecting them from the blood diseases.While the development of the adenine base editor is an exciting development in base editing, more work remains before base editing can be used to treat patients with genetic diseases, including tests of safety, efficacy, and side effects.“Creating a machine that makes the genetic change you need to treat a disease is an important step forward, but it’s only one part of what’s needed to treat a patient,” Liu said. “We still have to deliver that machine, we have to test its safety, we have to assess its beneficial effects in animals and patients and weigh them against any side effects. We need to do many more things. But having the machine is a good start.” Scientists at Harvard University and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have developed a new class of DNA base editor that can alter genomic structure to help repair the type of mutations that account for half of human disease-associated point mutations. These mutations are associated with disorders ranging from genetic blindness to sickle-cell anemia to metabolic disorders to cystic fibrosis.A team of researchers led by David Liu, professor of chemistry and chemical biology at Harvard University and a core institute member of the Broad, developed an adenine base editor (ABE) capable of rearranging the atoms in a target adenine (A), one of the four bases that make up DNA, to resemble guanine (G) instead, and then tricking cells into fixing the other DNA strand to make the change permanent. The result is that what had been an A•T base pair is changed to a G•C base pair. The new system is described in a paper published online today in the journal Nature. In addition to Liu, the study was led by Nicole Gaudelli, a postdoctoral fellow in Liu’s lab; Alexis Komor, a former postdoctoral fellow in Liu’s lab who is now an assistant professor at the University of California, San Diego; graduate student Holly Rees; and former postdoctoral fellows Ahmed H. Badran and David I. Bryson.The new system transforms A•T base pairs into G•C base pairs at a target position in the genome of living cells with surprising efficiency, the researchers said, often exceeding 50 percent, with virtually no detectable byproducts such as random insertions, deletions, translocations, or other base-to-base conversions. The adenine base editor can be programmed by researchers to target a specific base pair in a genome using a guide RNA and a modified form of CRISPR-Cas9 that no longer cuts double-stranded DNA.Being able to make this type of conversion is particularly important because approximately half of the 32,000 disease-associated point mutations already identified by researchers are a change from a G•C base pair to a A•T base pair.Liu said that particular change is unusually common in part because about 300 times a day in every human cell, a spontaneous chemical reaction converts a cytosine (C) base into uracil (U), which behaves like thymine (T). While there are natural cellular repair mechanisms to fix that spontaneous change, the machinery is not perfect and occasionally fails to make the repair. The result can be the mutation of the G•C base pair to an A•U or A•T base pair, which can lead to certain genetic diseases.First authors Holly Rees (left), David Liu, and Nicole Gaudell. Photo by Casey Atkins“Because of this slight chemical instability of the Cs in our genome, about 50 percent of pathogenic point mutations in humans are of the type G•C to A•T,” said Liu said. “What we’ve developed is a base editor, a molecular machine, that in a programmable, irreversible, efficient, and extremely clean way can correct these mutations in the genome of living cells. For some target sites, that conversion reverses the mutation that is associated with a particular disease.”A major addition to genome-editing technologies, the adenine base editor joins other base-editing systems recently developed in Liu’s lab, such as BE3 and its improved variant, BE4. Using these base editors, researchers can now correct all the so-called “transition” mutations — C to T, T to C, A to G, or G to A — that together account for almost two-thirds of all disease-causing point mutations, including many that cause serious illnesses that currently have no treatment. Additional research is needed to enable the adenine base editor to target as much of the genome as possible, as Liu and his students previously did through engineering variants of BE3.At first glance, Liu said, it might appear as though developing the adenine base editor would be a straightforward process: Simply replace the enzyme in BE3 that performs the “chemical surgery” to transform C into U with one that could convert A into I (inosine), a nucleotide that behaves similarly to G. Unfortunately, he said, there is no such enzyme that works in DNA, so Liu and colleagues made the unusual choice to evolve their own DNA adenine deaminase, a hypothetical enzyme that would convert A to I in DNA.“This wasn’t a small decision, because we’ve had a longstanding rule in the lab that if step one of your project is to evolve the starting material that’s needed for the rest of the project to begin, that’s not a very good project, because it’s really two major projects,” Liu said. “And if you have to spend years just to get the starting material for the rest of your project, that’s a tough road.“In this case, we felt the potential impact was significant enough to break the rule, and I’m very fortunate that Nicole [Gaudelli] was brave enough to take on the challenge.”The stakes were particularly high for Gaudelli, Liu said, “because if we weren’t able to complete step one and evolve a DNA adenine deaminase, then step two wouldn’t go anywhere, and we would have little to show for all the work.”“Protein evolution is still largely an art as much as it is a science,” Liu said. “But Nicole has amazing instincts about how to interpret the results from each stage of protein evolution, and after seven generations of evolution, she succeeded in evolving a high-performance A base editor, which we call ABE7.10.”last_img read more

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Project aims to connect ND with local music scene

first_imgA benefit concert on Friday will kick off The Bridge Project, a new initiative to increase connections between members of the Notre Dame and South Bend communities.The Notre Dame Student Expo, featuring five student bands and one South Bend group, will take place at 6 p.m. at The Pool, a venue located in the Central High/Stephenson Mills apartments.According to its Facebook page, The Bridge Project is an effort to increase interactions and friendships between the South Bend community and its college campuses by exposing students to the local music scene.Junior Will Murray, a student founder of initiative, said the idea for the project arose from his and others’ experiences studying abroad, where he said other universities’ campuses were more integrated into their cities.“They [students studying abroad] really just had an amazing connection with the city they were staying in and the campus they were on, just really benefitting from that connection and having a lot more to do on the weekend that Notre Dame really doesn’t have,” Murray said. “We weren’t sure there was a lot to do in South Bend, but sure enough there is, and we’ve been exploring it through our contacts in the community.”Murray said he collaborated with several other students and two community members, Pool operators Dena Woods and Lt. Gus Bennett, to create and maintain a Facebook calendar that comprehensively lists upcoming concerts and events. He said that donations from Friday’s concert would go towards developing the calendar further.“There’s tons of awesome bands in South Bend that no one really knows about,” Murray said. “Now it’s allcentralized, and people will be able to explore that and really benefit.”Dena Woods, an operator of The Pool who is working with The Bridge Project, said she hopes the Students Expo will bring the initiative to students’ attention and encourage them to explore local music.“Every time I’ve interacted with students, they don’t seem to know what we’re doing,” she said. “It’s a bit harder for students to find out about these events because they’re so isolated … we want to expose them to the space and … create an awareness of what’s going on downtown.”Woods said The Bridge Project is currently focused on developing the music scene, but the group hopes to expand into other areas, such as art, film and poetry.“Right now the easiest way, I think, to connect with college students is the music scene, so that’s definitely the driving force behind it, but we’re certainly looking to open it up to many more events,” said James Bachmayer, another founder of the project. “I just went to the farmer’s market yesterday, actually, and brought a couple friends, and there was a nice post on the website. When I was there a lot of vendors were talking about these events that aren’t music-related that are happening throughout the month, so we definitely want this to be a catalyst for future growth.”Murray said he hopes the concert will encourage students from all college campuses in South Bend to get involved with the project and apply their majors to aspects of the campaign, such as graphic design. He said he also wants students to attend events on the calendar and form bands to perform at local venues.“Once we pop this bubble and get the connection flowing, we can just accomplish so many things,” he said.For more information on The Bridge Project and the Students Expo, visit the group’s Facebook page or contact them at [email protected]last_img read more

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Chinese Fishing Vessels Continue to Hound Latin America

first_imgBy Gustavo Arias Retana/Diálogo June 21, 2019 In late March 2019, the Ecuadorean Navy detected 245 Chinese fishing vessels in their maritime border, near the Galapagos Islands. The situation, far from the first incident of its kind, put the country on alert. Chinese vessels fish indiscriminately, taking advantage of insufficient surveillance in the area to decimate the marine fauna. Ecuador had already detected 60 Chinese industrial fishing vessels near the Galapagos in 2018. In 2017, authorities intercepted cargo ship Fu Yuan Yu Leng 999 inside a marine reserve. The ship was carrying 300 tons of shark fins, hammerhead sharks, and silky sharks. The crew was prosecuted for environmental crimes. Other countries, such as Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru, and Uruguay have also suffered from voracious Chinese fishing in their seas. Juan Carlos Sueiro, head of the international nongovernmental organization (NGO) Oceana, said the problem is growing in Latin America, and authorities’ response is weak. “These Chinese vessels work in the same way: they fish in international waters, near the maritime border of Latin American countries,” Sueiro told Diálogo. “Almost every country has detected Chinese vessels entering their waters illegally. It’s not new and happens on a daily basis.” Rodrigo García Píngaro, head of the Organization for the Conservation of Cetaceans, an Uruguayan NGO, said that Chinese vessels fish regardless of species’ endangered status. They seek mass shoals and prey for species that garner high prices in Asia for their alleged medicinal effects. Some of the most affected species are the giant squid, cod, tuna, black hake, shark, and the totoaba. “China is hungry for seafood that can’t be found in other seas; here there are still stocks of valuable fish,” García told Diálogo. “They use ghost nets to catch everything without distinction, whatever species they can, hoping they’ll be well paid.” Ghost nets are nets left behind by fishermen, or lost in the high seas. Marine Destruction Guillermo Caille, executive director of Natural Patagonia Foundation, says that the situation in Latin America is part of a systematic attack China conducts in the world’s seas to sustain the Asian nation’s consumption and exports. In its 2018 report, “State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture,” the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations said that China is the main producer of fish and fish products worldwide, and, since 2002, the main exporter. This not only implies that the Asian nation seeks areas rich in resources to meet its needs, but also intends to set up logistics bases, such as ports, shipyards, and fish processing plants near areas to be exploited. In Latin America, for instance, Chinese company Shangdong Baoma intends to develop an economic free zone with a port, shipyard, and processing and packaging plant for frozen fish in the region of Punta Yeguas, east of Montevideo, Uruguay. The company seeks to begin construction before the end of 2019. “The main reason for China to attempt to develop the port in Montevideo is that these fleets lack a fishing base on land, outside Asia. They depend on foreign companies to repair their fishing vessels, stock and supply, as well as planning for and making their captures. This causes loss of efficiency and benefits, which increases production costs,” says the NGO Oceanosanos in its report, “Background on the Chinese Terminal Investment Project at Montevideo Port 2016-2019”. U.S. Support Faced with the Chinese threat, the United States supports Latin American authorities to avoid greater damage to the ecosystem. For example, the Ecuadorean and U.S. navies conducted exercise PASSEX in the Pacific Ocean on November 22, 2018, which focused on preventing, dissuading, and eradicating illegal fishing. “Combating unreported, and unregulated fishing is a top international priority,” said to the press U.S. Navy Commander Jamie Hopkins, commander of the USS Wayne E. Meyer, one of the vessels that participated in the exercise. “It’s a worldwide problem estimated to cost the global fishing industry billions of dollars a year.” However, the fight is not an easy one. China is decimating marine species and seeking to expand onto land by setting up ports and fish processing plants. Confronting China’s intentions requires a regional commitment to increase surveillance and prevent the Asian country from destroying the marine resources in the region.last_img read more

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West Babylon Man Charged With Murdering Brother

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York John BeaumontA man was arrested for stabbing his 57-year-old brother to death in their father’s West Babylon home where all three live on Saturday evening, Suffolk County police said.Officers responded to their Densfield Road after John Beaumont, 54, called 911 to report that he stabbed his brother, Thomas, during an argument while their father was home at 5:33 p.m.., police said. The father was not injured.Thomas Beaumont was taken to Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center in West Islip, where he later died.John Beaumont was charged with second-degree murder. He pleaded not guilty Sunday at First District Court in Central Islip.last_img read more

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