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How they leveled the playing field

first_imgSot also enjoyed Nowak’s lessons, especially when it came to reading and understanding sources.“He taught us how to ‘read’ a book in four hours — any book! This is a skill that I will take with me throughout the rest of my College life and into my career,” he said.Learning to read and parse texts, whether in a book or in an archive, are vital elements of what Nowak calls “the work of history” that he hopes students will understand better after taking “The Game” or other history courses. He plans to incorporate oral histories into his spring course, “Intro to Harvard History: Beyond the Three Lies,” and is recruiting alumni who concentrated in history to participate.“History is not just about dates and battles,” he said. “You take a bunch of primary sources, and you’ve got to figure out the story to tell from them. [Students] are actually doing that in this class. They can see that they are contributing to understanding what happened in the past, but also that they are learning a skill that will be valuable in the future.” American voters don’t hate ambitious women, after all The long march for suffrage Related Study finds some differences in attitude, though, depending on party More than a half-century after she graduated, Ann Gordon Bain ’59 still remembers the joys and indignities that came with being a female athlete at Radcliffe College.In one memorable incident, a member of the men’s basketball practice team interrupted a varsity women’s basketball game against Pembroke College because the match had been delayed and cut into the men’s practice time.“We used to play half-court basketball because [it was thought that] women couldn’t run from one end of the court to the other,” said Bain, who was on the basketball, field hockey, and fencing teams as an undergraduate studying aerospace engineering and Chinese. “We hadn’t finished a varsity game, and they said, ‘Sorry, it’s our court.’ So we walked off the court. That’s the way it was in those days.”Bain revisited her memories of athletic life on campus as part of an oral history project designed by history lecturer Zachary Nowak. In his fall course, HIST 1852: “The Game: College Sports as History,” current students interviewed 99 former Harvard athletes, 96 of whom were women, and used the resulting transcripts as the foundations for their final papers. The interviews will also be submitted to the Harvard Archives for preservation — a contribution of stories that span five decades, from the 1950s to the early 2000s.“There were just no audiences for women’s sports, and we didn’t expect anyone to show up,” says Ann Gordon Bain ’59.Prior to Title IX, “You have not only underfunding of women’s sports, but administrative disapproval and administrative control of women’s sports. The result of that echo that is that the voices of women athletes are dramatically underrepresented” in the archives, said Nowak. “One of the goals of [this project] is to go get some of those voices and put them in the archive to, in a small way, rectify some archival silences.”Nowak, who received a Ph.D. in American studies from the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences in 2018, was inspired to pursue the project after he noticed a lack of archival material focusing on women athletes at the University, especially items from before Title IX was passed in 1972. The law prohibits sex discrimination in schools that receive federal funds, and was instrumental in expanding female student-athletes’ access to scholarships, facilities, and equipment.Nowak worked with Harvard University Athletics and the Harvard College Mindich Program in Engaged Scholarship over the summer to survey former athletes about their experiences at Harvard and invite them to participate in the project. Almost 100 agreed, and were matched with a student in the course, some of whom were athletes as well. Students learned how to conduct an oral history interview and met with their assigned athlete over Zoom and the phone.For Bain, who lives in Augusta, N.J., the project offered a new avenue for connecting with the University outside of her work as an admissions interviewer, which she has done for 40 years. She was paired with men’s basketball guard Rio Haskett ’21, and said she participated because she wanted to learn more about her young counterparts and to contribute to the historical process.Bain, who has had a long career as a tennis pro, pointed to tennis icon Billie Jean King (who received the 2002 Radcliffe Medal) and Olympic figure skater and surgeon Tenley Albright ’57, M.D. ’61, as women athletes who demonstrated what could be achieved in the face of inequality “to those of us who were, like myself, somewhat oblivious” decades ago.Despite the challenges of being a female athlete, Bain felt her College years were both formative and fun. During her time at Radcliffe, “There were just no audiences for women’s sports, and we didn’t expect anyone to show up,” she said. “We were all [women] who love to play, or we wouldn’t have been there.”Mary Howard ’79 (pictured), field hockey alumna, was interview by Jon Sot ’22, a punter on the football team. Courtesy photo“Much has changed for the better,” said Bain, noting Title IX’s positive effects on women’s college sports. “But you don’t hear of people doing three sports now [like I did]. Sports have become much more concentrated. I think of this as both a plus and a minus — the time involved has changed, and the opportunities in sports have also changed tremendously.”Current undergrads in the course were eager to speak to those who had come before them.“I wanted to learn how sports came to Harvard, and about all of those athletes who paved the way,” said Jon Sot ’22, an economics concentrator and punter on the football team who interviewed field hockey alumna Mary Howard ’79. “Getting a firsthand account of what athletics were like back then really changed my perspective on being an athlete now and allowed me to truly appreciate what we have as athletes.”The place of gender in college sports is but one topic in “The Game.” Others include amateurism and class distinction as seen through the Harvard-Yale rowing regatta of 1852 (the country’s first intercollegiate sports competition); the codes of masculinity present throughout the history of college football; and evaluating the complexities of the “color line” story of professional baseball.“Sports can be fun, but they’re never frivolous. They always have some bigger cultural meaning. They always reflect what’s happening in the larger culture,” said Nowak. “The class is not just asking students to take sports seriously, because I think if they’re in this class, most of them do. It’s also about giving them the tools to understand and explain why they are important.” Juniors create Women’s History Tour to share stories about Harvard pioneers Standing on their shoulders Radcliffe project marks 19th Amendment centennial while focusing on the women who would not be fully enfranchised for decades more last_img read more

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New Works From Duncan Sheik & More Set for Vassar’s Powerhouse Season

first_img View Comments We know where we want to be this summer! New works from Spring Awakening’s Duncan Sheik, Hedwig’s Stephen Trask, 2015 Tony nominee Ayad Akhtar (Disgraced) and more are slated for Vassar and New York Stage and Film’s 2015 Powerhouse Season. The event will run June 26 through August 2 at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. Casting will be announced later.Noir, with music by Sheik, book by Kyle Jarrow, and lyrics by Jarrow and Sheik, will receive a musical theater workshop. Helmed by Rachel Chavkin, the tuner follows a heartbroken man who never leaves his apartment and is consoled only by the music on the radio. Through the thin walls, he hears almost every word of the couple next door—and before long, his eavesdropping becomes an obsession. Soon he finds himself drawn into a web of lust, lies, deceit and danger. Sheik is also currently working on the Broadway-aimed American Psycho.Meanwhile, Junk by Ayad Akhtar and directed by Doug Hughes, is set for the Reading Festival #1, which takes place June 26 through June 28. Also tapped for the Reading Festival #1’s lineup is Stephen Trask & Peter Yanowitz’s 15 Minutes, which will have a book by Rick Elice and direction by Trip Cullman.First up on the mainstage will be Keith Bunin’s The Unbuilt City, which will run July 1 through July 12. Directed by Sean Mathias, the show is set on a cold afternoon in February. Jonah knocks on the door of a townhouse in Brooklyn Heights. He’s come to persuade Claudia to sell her famously secret art collection to a university archive. Instead she turns the tables and reveals to him a series of mysteries about the nature of love, legacy and the untold history of the city.Hannah Bos and Paul Thureen’s The Light Years will follow on the Main Stage, playing July 23 through August 2. Developed and directed by Oliver Butler and made by The Debate Society, the production is a haunted love story spanning 40 years. Set at the Chicago World’s Fairs of 1893 and 1933, The Light Years revolves around Steele MacKaye, a forgotten visionary theatrical impresario commissioned to design and build the Spectatorium, a 12,000 seat theater at the 1893 fair.Other notable presentations include a musical workshop of Michael John LaChiusa’s Rain, which will be directed by Barry Edelstein and is based on the short story by Somerset Maugham, and a reading of the new play White Noise, White Light by Nicky Silver.last_img read more

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Broadway Grosses: Checking Back In on Tony-Winning Fun Home

first_imgPint-sized Tony nominee Sydney Lucas sang about that ring of keys for the final time in Fun Home on October 4, and the musical sent her off with a slight uptick. The Tony-winning tuner celebrated a box office increase of over $40,000, despite a miniscule decrease in attendance; it still managed to hit 99.3% capacity in the small space. Meanwhile, Main Stem perennials The Lion King, The Book of Mormon, Hamilton, Wicked and Aladdin showed no signs of leaving their posts in the top five grossing shows, and Thérèse Raquin and Sylvia began preview performances. We will continue to monitor the two limited engagements through previews and opening night.Here’s a look at who was on top—and who was not—for the week ending October 4:FRONTRUNNERS (By Gross)1. The Lion King ($1,892,393)2. The Book of Mormon ($1,489,412)3. Hamilton ($1,481,172)4. Wicked ($1,454,570)5. Aladdin ($1,365,965)UNDERDOGS (By Gross)5. Hand to God ($238,075)4. Fool for Love ($236,855)*3. Dames at Sea ($229,783)*2. Thérèse Raquin ($227,826)**1. Sylvia ($124,200)***FRONTRUNNERS (By Capacity)1. The Book of Mormon (102.63%)2. Hamilton (101.30%)3. The Lion King (100.01%)4. Fun Home (99.32%)5. Beautiful: The Carole King Musical (98.10%)UNDERDOGS (By Capacity)5. Spring Awakening (66.09%)4. Thérèse Raquin (65.26%)**3. Jersey Boys (64.02%)2. Hand to God (54.58%)1. Amazing Grace (49.95%)* Number based on eight preview performances**Number based on five preview performances***Number based on two preview performancesSource: The Broadway League View Commentslast_img read more

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Lanco Close to Escaping Disastrous Griffin Purchase

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The West Australian:Indian group Lanco Infratech has escaped a $200m payment linked to its disastrous purchase of the Griffin coal mine as part of a confidential settlement of one of [Western Australia’s] biggest commercial court cases.The settlement late last year coincided with insolvency firm KordaMentha flagging a final distribution of about $80m to creditors of the mine’s former owner, Griffin Energy.Lanco sued KordaMentha and its Griffin administrators in the WA Supreme Court in 2015, alleging deceptive and misleading conduct over the 2010 sale of the Collie mine and seeking up to $700m in damages. KordaMentha denied the claims and counter-sued for breach of agreement, chasing $150m plus interest outstanding on the $740m sale.While the terms of the settlement between Lanco and KordaMentha were meant to remain confidential, a senior Lanco executive has told Indian media that the agreement included the cancellation of the $200m debt and provided for KordaMentha to pick up Lanco’s $10m of legal expenses.During the trial of its lawsuit early last year, Lanco claimed that KordaMentha withheld an unfavourable geological review from the mine sale data room that indicated Griffin had less coal than first thought. The company argued that had it been aware of the reports, it would have paid no more than $220m for the mine, one of the biggest employers in WA’s South West.The coal producer has been a horror investment for Lanco, incurring a reported $300m in accumulated losses.More: https://thewest.com.au/business/mining/lanco-nfratech-avoids-200m-payment-in-griffin-coal-mine-settlement-ng-b88711567z Lanco Close to Escaping Disastrous Griffin Purchaselast_img read more

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Outdoor Updates: Upcoming NC workshops for women in woodland stewardship

first_imgHikers are trashing Australia’s sacred rock Bear in Colorado takes Subaru on a joyride Aug. 29, 2019Burke County CenterMorganton, NChttps://aug29fhnc.eventbrite.com Upcoming NC workshops for women in woodland stewardship In the months leading up to the ban, however, tourists has flocked to the rock in a last-ditch effort to climb it, boosting the number of hikers from an average of about 140 people a day to as many as 500. Local news outlets have documented an endless stream of hikers making their way up the rock. In their wake, the Washington Post reports they’ve left behind “trash, overflowing septic waste and illegal camping sites.” Aug. 22, 2019Lenoir County CenterKinston, NChttps://aug22fhnc.eventbrite.com Aug. 8, 2019Chatham County CenterPittsboro, NC https://aug8fhnc.eventbrite.comcenter_img It’s an iconic landmark in Australia: Uluru, formerly known as Ayers Rock, is a massive sandstone rock formation that rises out of the flat ground around it in central Australia. The indigenous Pitjantjatjara Anangu people consider the rock sacred and signs that decorate the entrance to Uluru-Kata Tjust National Park, where Uluru is located, have long asked visitors not to climb it. Nonetheless, Uluru has become a popular hiking spot for tourists. In 2017, the Anangu successfully secured a hiking ban on the rock, which goes into effect in October 2019.  A bear in Boulder County, Colorado found itself in over its head when it entered an unlocked car and climbed in. The car door then closed behind the animal, sending it into a panic. As it tried to claw its way out of all four doors the bear accidentally shifted the car into neutral with its hindquarters, sending the car careening about 100 feet down a hill. During its downhill cruise the car swiped a tree, leaving the car too damaged to drive. Luckily for the bear, the impact with the tree also popped a car door open and the bear escaped into the woods, assumedly unharmed but armed with a good tale to tell. The moral of the story? Keep your car doors locked in bear country, especially if you have something inside of the car that might attract the curious animals.  Monday, July 15 Three ForestHer NC workshops will be held across the state of North Carolina in August. The workshops are for women landowners and natural resource professionals interested in learning more about managing and conserving private lands. According to a news release, participants will learn about the state’s forest ecosystems, identify the types of forest they own or manage, and understand the role their land plays in the larger landscape. In North Carolina, 65 percent of private forestland is jointly owned by women, yet statistics indicate that women are far less likely to attend landowner programs and participant in managing the land. The workshops cost $25 per person and will run from 9:30 a.m. until 3 p.m. Pre-registration is required.last_img read more

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4 step plan to credit union cloud readiness

first_img 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr In the Disaster Recovery/Business Continuity (DR/BCP) planning world we use the saying “It’s not IF something happens, it’s WHEN“.  The same is now being said for whether credit union’s will become cloud adopters – it’s no longer a question on whether or not to invest in cloud technologies – it’s when and more importantly, HOW? Now that the decision of “go/no-go” is becoming clearer, credit union CIO’s are finding themselves challenged to take the first steps to effectively and securely deploy strategic cloud solutions. We’ve developed this checklist to help you determine your credit union cloud readiness!1) Know Your Infrastructure – Before you even begin to make a move to the cloud, you need to make sure you have the right network infrastructure in place to support anticipated traffic. Optimizing your network can improve uptime, latency and Quality of Service (QoS) when done properly.  So where do you begin?If you haven’t done so yet, document through detailed diagrams your entire infrastructure. I’m not talking about a high level visio diagram that shows just your core, a network connection and your firewall either. Now is the time to dig in and gain that intimate level of understanding of the physical and logical components. Use this information to identify single-points-of-failure, network bottlenecks and even vendor dependencies that are not aligned with your strategic goals.  If you don’t have the capability to do this in-house, partner with someone who understands credit union technologies and compliance requirements to assist. This is where you want your budget dollars to go – infrastructure improvements. continue reading »last_img read more

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Facing coronavirus: We need YOUR leadership

first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Jim Bouchard “THE SENSEI LEADER is not just another leadership development program. It is a movement.”Our programs support this movement and help us fulfill our vision and mission…                                                                     Vision: To promote … Web: TheSenseiLeader.com Details There’s no way to soft-pedal it. The coronavirus is now the greatest challenge facing us––all of us today.We need your leadership. It doesn’t matter if you’re a CEO, branch manager, member of the board––or if you’re a teller, a member service rep or the janitor. We need leadership at ALL levels.Leadership has nothing to do with rank, title or position of authority. Leaders are people who see what needs doing and they do it––and right now, we need all hands on deck.No blame. Blame is destructive in a crisis.Take care not to blame in your own leadership practice. It’s easy to do in these situations. Right now people are angry. They’re blaming government. They’re blaming scientists. And when they get laid off and start struggling with payments––they’re going to blame you.People are blaming leaders for their response. We can argue whether or not the response has been appropriate to the threat. Let’s save that for when this is over. Let’s focus on what we need to do as leaders to face the very real challenges the virus and our response is handing us right now.Work the problem.There will be plenty of challenges coming as this thing unfolds.Identify the impact. Focus on solutions and work-arounds. Face the problem head on.You’ve got functional issues. Staff members may become infected. You deal with the public. You handle money––well documented as a means of transmission with these pathogens.People are already rushing stores for toilet paper and hand sanitizer. It’s likely some will rush you for cash too. And as cancellations and closings increase, people are going to have a tough time paying their loans.What is your response? You’ve got to focus on immediate steps that will be best for your staff and for your members.To do this…Get people involved . . . at all levels. One of the biggest mistakes leaders can make in a situation like this is trying to do it alone. You are a leader. By definition you are not working alone.You may have to lay people off before this is over. You may have to close branches or limit access to members. You will make decisions that can severely impact the lives of the people you serve.Involve them. Be as transparent as possible about what you’re facing. And I mean involve everyone. One of the special things about credit unions is that as members, we are owners! Be sure to involve us.And involve your staff––at all levels. Leadership has nothing to do with rank, title or position of authority. Everyone on your team––everyone––can contribute.General Patton famously said,“Never tell people how to do things. Tell them what to do and they will surprise you with their ingenuity.”Tell people you’re up against it. See what solutions they come up with. You may be surprised when some of the best ideas come from the most unlikely sources.Share what you know about the threat.The problem with COVID-19 is that there is a lot we don’t know. Healthcare officials are saying they don’t yet understand how this virus is mutating, why it’s particularly dangerous to specific types of people or exactly how long it can live on hard surfaces.These are all troubling things NOT to know about a dangerous pathogen. As you learn more, share more.And share your plans.At least the plans you have so far.One of the most selfish things a leader can do is to announce “I have a plan,” only to follow-up with “…and I’ll announce it later this week.”This can mean “I really don’t have a plan, but I want people to think I do.” And that’s how a lot of people will take it.Or it can mean you’re sincerely trying to comfort people. It’s more comforting to share what you know, admit what you don’t and promise to share more details as you know them.Too often the justification for keeping things close to the vest is to avoid panic. Nothing causes people to panic more than keeping them in the dark.The monster in the closet is always bigger than the one that remains in the room when you flick the lights on. Create a vacuum in a crisis and rumors, conspiracy theories and outright lies rush in to fill the void. Some of these can be lethal––more lethal than the actual problem.You will have to decide what facts might cause panic. You also need to weigh them carefully against the damage you might do by not sharing as much as possible.Be confident, yet humble. Lead by example.At no time is this more important than during a crisis.Your people don’t want to see you panic under pressure. Sure, you’re human. You’re probably as frightened and worried as anyone else. But people are counting on your example. How you conduct yourself will either send them into a panic––or inspire them to keep their minds on the task at hand and pull together to overcome any obstacle.If you’re scared––nothing wrong with saying so. Just try to maintain your decorum when you do. State your fears and your reasons for those fears in a measured, deliberate way.The best way to do this is to prepare what you’re going to say. Very few people are good “off the cuff” in these situations––and even the best usually take some time to think about what they’re going to say and how they’re going to say it.Include these components in your message:State the facts. State the problem clearly and accurately. Share your fears or concerns. No blame. Reveal your plans or response. Be careful not to impose an edict––just share what you’ve been thinking about so far.Solicit input from your people. Ask about their concerns. Ask for suggestions. Show that you appreciate their ideas.Bring them together. Express re-assurance. Tell them that “Together, we’re going to get through this.” Always remember that who you are as a leader becomes reality in the hearts and minds of the people you serve through what you say and how you say it.Transform ME into WE.One of the most important roles of a leader is to get people working together––pulling in the same direction…We’re all in this together. With your leadership, we’ll persevere. And whether it’s your first real crisis, or another in the hit parade––you will discover new talents, new reserves of energy and creativity. You will grow as a leader and as a person.Adversity? We’ve got our share right now.Celebrate Adversity. It’s your opportunity to become the leader you might never have imagined without it.last_img read more

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Minister Divjak instructed schools to postpone travel abroad

first_imgOn the Facebook profile of the Minister of Science and Education Blaženka Divjak, instructions for primary and secondary schools in Croatia were published, related to organized trips abroad. The announcement states that the safety of students and educators must come first, which is why the Ministry of Science and Education in cooperation with the Civil Protection Headquarters sent instructions to schools to postpone all travel outside the Republic of Croatia for at least the next month. We transmit the instructions in full: Source: Facebook Minister Blaženka DivjakPhoto: Ministry of Science and Educationcenter_img “In accordance with the recommendation of the Civil Protection Headquarters of the Republic of Croatia, and taking into account the safety of students and teachers, we hereby instruct you to postpone organized trips abroad for the time being due to the current and changing epidemiological situation in the world.The Ministry of Science and Education will inform you in a timely manner of any new recommendations”, Reads the instructions of the Minister of Science and Education Blaženka Divjak.last_img read more

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Unsponsored elite runners to be provided with carbon-fiber shoes

first_imgThe governing body says the rules are designed “to maintain the current technology status quo” until the Tokyo Olympics.After that the Working Group on Athletic Shoes, which includes representatives from shoe manufacturers and the World Federation of the Sporting Goods Industry, will work “to set the parameters for achieving the right balance between innovation, competitive advantage and universality and availability.”World Athletics CEO Jon Ridgeon said the postponement of the Tokyo Olympics as a result of the coronavirus pandemic had given the governing body “more time to consult with stakeholders and experts and develop amended rules that will guide the sport through until late 2021″.”We have a better understanding now of what technology is already in the market and where we need to draw the line to maintain the status quo until after the Tokyo Olympic Games,” Ridgeon said.Topics : The shoes, which are now being produced by other sportswear manufacturers, have led to accusations that they create unfair competition.World Athletics has already limited the thickness of the sole on the shoes to 40 millimeters, a rule it kept in place Tuesday.In a new initiative, track and field’s governing body said it would provide athletes with the shoes if they do not already receive them from sponsors, under a “Athletic Shoe Availability Scheme”.”The Working Group on Athletic Shoes will develop this scheme including timelines, elite athlete criteria, numbers of pairs of shoes required and method of distribution,” it said in a statement. World Athletics announced Tuesday it was creating a scheme to provide unsponsored elite runners with the same carbon-fiber versions of shoes that have revolutionized road running, in an acceptance that the technological advances are irreversible.Elite athletes wearing versions of the Nike Vaporfly, the carbon plates of which lend a propulsive sensation to every stride, have set a host of personal bests and Nike runners have practically swept the board in long-distance events — they took 31 of the 36 podium places at the six marathon majors last year.Eliud Kipchoge wore an advanced version of the shoes when the Kenyan become the first man to break the two-hour barrier for the marathon in October 2019.last_img read more

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Brisbane named one of world’s best cities to raise a family

first_imgBrisbane has been named one of the world’s best cities for families in a new study.BRISBANE has been named as one of the best cities in the world to raise a family, boasting affordable housing, high levels of safety and some of the happiest people on the planet.According to the Best Cities for Families Index of 2017, created by real estate company Homeday, Brisbane ranks 18th on the list of the world’s best cities for families.Sydney and Melbourne also made the top 20, ranking 13th and 15th respectively. Copenhagen, Denmark, has been named the best city in the world for families. Picture: iStock.Homeday managing director Steffen Wicker said a family-friendly location was a major factor for young families determining where to buy a home.“For those families trying to decide where to put down roots, they need data-led research more than ever to help them make an informed decision,” he said.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus23 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market23 hours ago“We hope that this study will make the all-important choice of where to raise a family that bit easier for young movers.”BEST CITIES FOR FAMILIES INDEX 20171. Copenhagen, Denmark2. Oslo, Norway3. Zurich, Switzerland4. Stockholm, Sweden5. Hamburg, Germany6. Vancouver, Canada7. Basel, Switzerland8. Toronto, Canada9. Stuttgart, Germany10. Munich, Germany11. Lausanne, Switzerland12. Vienna, Austria13. Sydney, Australia14. Helsinki, Finland15. Melbourne, Australia16. Bern, Switzerland17. Montreal, Canada18. Brisbane, Australia19. Auckland, New Zealand20. Frankfurt, Germany(Source: Homeday) Brisbane has scored highly for housing, green space and cost of living in a new study. Picture: Liam Kidston.Brisbane earned an overall ranking of 7.68, scoring an 8 for housing, a 9 for green space, 6.5 for education, 8.7 for safety, 9.5 for cost of living, 8.7 for unemployment, 7 for transport and healthcare and 8.64 for general happiness.It scored poorly when it came to maternity/paternity laws and kid-friendly airports.The top five cities in the world for families, according to the study, are from Nordic countries, with Copenhagen, Denmark, leading the pack. RECORD APARTMENT RESALE IN ABIAN RAINBOWS APLENTY IN SUNSHINE STATE SLEEPY SUBURB LANDS $3M-PLUS SALE center_img Brisbane has ranked 18th on a list of the 100 best cities in the world to raise a family. Picture: Patrick Hamilton.The online real estate portal asked hundreds of home buyers what makes a city great for raising a family.Using the answers they decided to take 15 factors into account to produce the study, including measures for housing, education, safety, unemployment, kid-friendliness, healthcare and general happiness.Homeday standardised each metric out of a score of 10, so the highest-performing city in each category became the benchmark. GET THE LATEST REAL ESTATE NEWS DIRECT TO YOUR INBOX HERE last_img read more

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