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Prep Sports Roundup: 10/26

first_imgOctober 26, 2019 /Sports News – Local Prep Sports Roundup: 10/26 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmail3-A Girls Soccer Championship MatchSANDY, Utah-Megan Olson scored the sole goal of the match in double overtime and the Manti Templars won their first-ever state girls title with a 1-0 win over Judge Memorial Saturday at Rio Tinto Stadium in the 3-A state girls soccer championship match. Katie Larsen posted the shutout in the win for Manti. Tags: Judge Soccer/Katie Larsen/Manti girls soccer/Megan Olson Written by Brad Jameslast_img read more

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CARAT 2012 Begins in Indonesia

first_img View post tag: News by topic View post tag: begins View post tag: CARAT 2012 Share this article Industry news Back to overview,Home naval-today CARAT 2012 Begins in Indonesia View post tag: Indonesiacenter_img A joint military exercise dubbed “Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training 2012” (CARAT) commenced on May 30 in Indonesia’s East Java province, the protagonists being Indonesian navy and its U.S. counterpart, Xinhua news portal informed.The waters off East Java province’s coast cities of Surabaya and Situbondo will be the venue of several maritime exercises including Medical Subject Matter Expert Exchange (SMEE), SMEE intelligence operation, SMEE Engineering and symposium, as confirmed by Indonesian Navy’s Eastern Fleet Commander, Rear Admiral Agung Pramono.The objective of the drill, which will include involvement of 830 mariners of the U.S. Navy and some 1,244 mariners from Indonesian side is strengthening of bilateral cooperation and military ties.The U.S. fleet taking part in CARAT will consist of three navy vessels USS Germantown, USS Vandegrift and USCG Waesche while Indonesian navy engaged three vessels KRI Diponegoro- 365, KRI Banjarmasin-592 and KRI Sutedi Senoputra-378, several helicopters and navy surveillance planes.CARAT is a series of bilateral military exercises between the U.S. Navy and the armed forces of Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Republic of the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. Timor Leste joins the exercise for the first time in 2012.While the training in each phase of CARAT varies based on shared goals of Indonesia and the U.S., a common theme is the development of maritime security capabilities, and increasing interoperability among participants. Skill areas exercised during CARAT include Maritime Interception Operations; riverine, amphibious and undersea warfare operations; diving and salvage operations; naval gunnery and maneuvering events, along with disaster response exercises.“The fact that CARAT continues to grow into its 18th year speaks volumes about both the relationship between our U.S. and Indonesian forces and this exercise,” said Capt. Dave Welch, Commander, Destroyer Squadron 31, based in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, the leader of CARAT Task Group 73.1.  “We are natural partners and friends, and we look forward to another successful year advancing that great relationship between our navies and armed forces.”[mappress]Naval Today Staff, May 31, 2012 View post tag: Naval View post tag: Navy CARAT 2012 Begins in Indonesia May 31, 2012last_img read more

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HMAS Sydney Strengthens International Bonds Across, Beyond Navy

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today HMAS Sydney Strengthens International Bonds Across, Beyond Navy HMAS Sydney Strengthens International Bonds Across, Beyond Navy Training & Education View post tag: Beyond The crew of HMAS Sydney (IV) have strengthened international bonds across and beyond the Navy during their successful port visit to Yokosuka, Japan from from October 6-15.From hosting official funcations onboard, to cross deck opportunities and cultural tours, Sydney (IV) ship’s company enthusiastically grabbed every opportunity they were given to mix with participating nations.LSCIS Michael Baruch made some new mates after sailing on HMAS Sydney (IV)’s host ship, JS Setogiri, for the International Fleet Review (IFR) practice day.“I spent the day with the Japanese communicators and we exchanged flags, which is a CIS ritual we try to do in every port,” said LS Baruch.“It’s all about coming together and getting involved with the other countries because there is nothing better than developing new relationships,” he said.He said he broke through cultural barriers by having a laugh with his new friends.“The Japanese think we are a pretty easy going nation, so it’s great to have a laugh with them,” he said.“They are very hospitable and they will bend over backwards to make us feel at home.”Currently on his first Navy deployment, MIDN Liam Northend spent the IFR practice day on Japanese Destroyer JS Umigiri.“The way they operate on the bridge is very different to how we operate, it was very formal” said MIDN Northend.“When slipping our berthing lines to sail, Japanese sailors ran down to the bollards and quickly repainted them, so I think we are a little bit more relaxed than them in that regard,” he said.Cultural tours organsised by the ship were also a big hit among the crew.AB Tanya Lohman said she jumped at the chance to visit the Imperial Palace and some ancient temples in Tokyo.“It was a great opportunity provided by the ship to go and see the sights of Japan,” said AB Lohman.“It was great to see the variety of new and old and it gave us a good idea of where to go later on, if we wanted to investigate further,” she said.“The Sensou-Ji Temple was fantastic and the market shopping around the temple was amazing as well.”Sydney (IV) is scheduled to return to Yokosuka in 2013 to embed with the US 7th Fleet.[mappress]Naval Today Staff,October 15, 2012; Image: Australian Navy Share this article View post tag: International View post tag: bondscenter_img View post tag: Sydney View post tag: strengthens View post tag: across October 15, 2012 View post tag: HMAS View post tag: Navylast_img read more

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USS Harry S. Truman and CVW 3 Support Operation Enduring Freedom

first_img USS Harry S. Truman and CVW 3 Support Operation Enduring Freedom View post tag: Truman View post tag: USS View post tag: operation August 29, 2013 View post tag: S View post tag: CVW View post tag: Enduring Back to overview,Home naval-today USS Harry S. Truman and CVW 3 Support Operation Enduring Freedom center_img Carrier Air Wing 3 flew its first fixed-wing aircraft sorties from the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) as part of its regularly scheduled deployment in support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) Aug. 27.“For over a year, we have been training hard as a carrier strike group and with our air wing at sea,” said Capt. Bob Roth, Harry S. Truman’s commanding officer. “The first flight represents the payoff of all the hard work and is a reflection of the effectiveness of our fleet response training plan. It showcases the great capability of the carrier strike group to provide air power from the sea until the last day [troops] are on the ground [in Afghanistan]. Today’s flights represent the culmination of all our training.”Marine Lt. Col. Joseph Reedy, commanding officer of the “Checkerboards” of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 312, was the first pilot to launch from Harry S. Truman in support of OEF this deployment.“It was a great honor to be the first pilot to fly in support of OEF during this deployment,” said Reedy. “I’m excited to support the Marines, Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen on the ground in Afghanistan. Our training prior to this deployment has proven invaluable to provide the necessary support so we can accomplish our mission.”In addition to training, Roth cited teamwork as a key to Team Truman and Team Battle Axe’s success.“I think our training was perfect,” said Roth. “We started with the basics of operating the ship at sea as we integrated with our air wing and other surface combatants that comprise our strike group. Our biggest key to success has been teamwork. None of us can accomplish the mission alone. We are firing on all cylinders and teamwork has brought us to this point.”Roth said he is very thankful for the personal dedication of all the Sailors and Marines and also for the support of their families.“I want to thank the Sailors and Marines on the deckplates who work the long hours to get the job done and do it willingly with a smile as they recognize the importance of our mission and sacrifice,” said Roth. “I want to also thank the families back home because without their strong support, we would not be able to fully dedicate ourselves to our mission while we serve at sea.”[mappress]Press Release, August 29, 2013; Image: US Navy View post tag: Harry Share this article Training & Education View post tag: Freedom View post tag: Support View post tag: 3last_img read more

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Sceneplay: Blade Runner

first_imgIn a line up of the greatest actors ever to have graced the silver screen it’s unlikely that 63 year-old Dutch actor Rutger Hauer would immediately spring to mind. Yet, Hauer will rightly be remembered for taking centre stage in a truly great cinematic scene.The film in question is Ridley Scot’s cult-classic Blade Runner starring Harrison Ford. Set in Los Angeles in 2019, the film follows Deckard (Ford), an ex-’Blade Runner’ brought out of retirement to hunt down sophisticated androids known as ‘replicants’. Eventually, only one of these remains, a commando known as Roy Batty (Hauer). He stalks Deckard through an abandoned house before a final, climactic confrontation on the rainy rooftops of a grimy, dilapidated slum. With his programmed life expectancy about to expire, Roy saves Deckard, catching him as he falls off a roof, before delivering his monologue; a speech so achingly brilliant that it can only fail to strike a chord with people who are dead inside. I’ve seen things you people wouldn’t believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhauser gate. All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain. Time to die.As he speaks his dying words, you can see, with every nuanced contortion of his face, and hear, with every painful pause, his desperate attempts to grasp the meaning of his life, even as it slips away. The emotional intensity of this scene relies on many factors. The setting is perfect: the rain falls continually out of the darkened sky, a steady drumming of despair echoing across the rooftops. The score by Vangelis is deeply affecting, a penetrating, bittersweet melody that soars through the scene. Finally, Scott must be congratulated for visual simplicity, aware that this is a cinematic scene of emotional depth, not technical fireworks. The essence of the scene is captured with simple beauty; no cynicism, and no sly, satirical wink to the audience. There is, instead, a soulful integrity that is neither sentimental nor soppy, but entirely sincere. It is a classic piece of cinema.In the aftermath of Roy’s death, there are precious seconds of reflection. Roy loved life, indeed he loved it enough to save the life of an enemy. He talks of the wondrous experiences in his short life, and he realises, in his final moments, that he will lose those memories forever; everything that has made him who he is will suddenly cease to exist. Yet, Roy finds his humanity in the knowledge that life is transient, and in the comfort that, for every human, there will always be a time to die.last_img read more

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Food execs sidelining green issues

first_imgEnvironmental and corporate social responsibilty (CSR) issues have plummeted down the agenda as the UK’s leading food executives turn their sights on dealing with the economic downturn.According to a new report, based on interviews with over 250 executives from across the food supply chain, sustainability and environmental issues went from ranking third among the ’main business challenges’ going forward to 13th.When questioned in 2007, a third of those interviewes stated that CSR was a major challenge (33%), but this dropped to 11% in this year’s Food & Beverage Senior Executive ’Top of Mind’ Survey, compiled by Allegra Strategies.The top spots were dominated by the economic downturn, rising ingredients costs, declining consumer spend and profitability. Value consciousness, healthy eating and convenience were viewed as major opportunities, while excellence in innovation, customer service and cost control were considered key com- petencies going forward.Meanwhile, Allegra reaffirmed its previous predictions that the rapid growth of the UK branded coffee chains would slow only slightly in 2009 and would break through 5,000 outlets by 2012.last_img read more

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UMF receives second largest donation in history

first_imgFARMINGTON – Eric C. Brown, interim president of the University of Maine at Farmington, is proud to announce that the University has received a generous gift of $3.225 million from two anonymous donors.This historic contribution is the second largest donation UMF has ever received.The gift creates the Catalyst Fund at UMF, which will provide the financial resources needed to implement and expand initiatives that bolster financial aid, stimulate student success, advance graduate education programs and more.“On behalf of the entire UMF community, I am deeply grateful to the donors for making this transformative and exceedingly generous investment in the University and the success of our students,” said Brown. “Their gift provides us with an infusion of vital resources for debt-relieving scholarships, our successful graduate school offerings and programs that promote student persistence. By making UMF a philanthropic priority the donors have signaled their strong belief in our values, our mission, and our institutional goals. We are incredibly fortunate to have their leadership and this magnitude of support.”Among the initiatives that will receive Catalyst Fund support is a new Persistence Scholarship Program that will provide students with a merit scholarship for being on track to successfully graduate in four years. In addition to their financial aid packages, full-time students with a 2.75 grade point average in their second, third and fourth years will receive annual scholarships. This initiative, focused on student success, has been crafted to encourage timely degree completion, thereby helping to reduce student loan debt upon graduation—a national problem. It will begin in the fall of 2019.In addition, a designated number of full-time students with unforeseen financial hardship will be eligible to receive an emergency grant to help them remain at UMF and complete their degree.The Catalyst Fund will also support an expansion of graduate-level professional development, certificate and master’s degree programs that align with UMF’s mission and strengths and speak to Maine’s ongoing need for career-ready, skilled professionals.“All of the student-focused initiatives that will receive investments through the Catalyst Fund will help our students pursue their intellectual interests, achieve their career goals, and add to the human capital of the Maine economy,” said Jared Cash, vice president of enrollment and external affairs. “The legacy of the donors’ gift will be increased achievement, well-being and career readiness among our students.”Interim President Brown said the effects of the donors’ philanthropic leadership will be felt as early as the coming months with the awarding of Persistence Scholarships and the plans to increase first-year student enrollment in the University’s successful Summer Experience, a program that helps students prepare for the transition from high school to college.last_img read more

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Graduating to a life in service

first_imgOne hundred and fifty years ago, scholars, dignitaries, and members of the military gathered at the end of a week of Commencement celebrations for a special service in Harvard Yard. The lengthy ceremony marked the end of the Civil War, and honored those Harvard sons who served — and those who gave their lives — in the conflict.“This was the celebration of peace and of those who had won it, and a marking of Harvard’s role in preserving the nation,” said President Drew Faust, who addressed the crowd assembled for the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) commissioning ceremony at Tercentenary Theatre on Wednesday.“From the founding days of the nation, when George Washington’s troops bivouacked on that rise over there and used my office as a hospital, Harvard has played a central role in America’s military traditions,” Faust said. “Today we recognize your part in carrying on that legacy — your part in the long Crimson line.”The ceremony includes the time-honored tradition of the first salute. Senior and Army 2nd Lt. William Scopa ’15 received his salute from his grandfather, Salvatore Scopa, who served in the Army in Italy during World War II. “I feel honored today for my service,” said the elder Scopa, who received a standing ovation. “My grandson brought me the honor,” he added. “I am very proud of him.” Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerFour Harvard seniors were commissioned as officers in the armed forces and received their first official assignments.The new Army officers are 2nd Lts. Sophia Chua-Rubenfeld of New Haven, Conn., a philosophy and South Asian studies concentrator who will attend Yale Law School on an educational delay and plans to work as a judge advocate; Molly McFadden, a history concentrator who will attend the Military Intelligence Basic Leadership Course in Fort Huachuca, Ariz.; and William Scopa, a social studies concentrator with a focus in war and democracy, whose first assignment is the Armor Basic Officer Leadership Course at Fort Benning, Ga. Navy Ensign Sebastian Saldivar graduates with a degree in applied mathematics and will report to Nuclear Power School in Goose Creek, S.C.Harvard and ROTC share a drive for excellence and a desire to educate and train future leaders of character who are committed to both excellence and to instilling in those they lead “a jealous regard for the honor of your unit,” said the day’s guest speaker, Army Gen. David G. Perkins.Harvard President Drew Faust, (from left) General David G. Perkins, Guest Speaker attend the ROTC Commissioning Ceremony in Tercentenary Theatre at Harvard University. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerIn becoming officers, instead of relying solely on people above them to grade their performance, the new officers should use the people they lead and serve, Perkins told to soon-to-be graduates, as “the greatest gauge” of their success.McFadden, surrounded by family and friends, posed for pictures with Chua-Rubenfeld and Scopa on the steps of Memorial Church before the service began. The Dunster House resident, who will report to the 2nd Cavalry Regiment in Vilseck, Germany, after completing her military intelligence course, said she was honored to be part of such a long tradition of service at Harvard. “That makes it very, very meaningful to all of us,” said McFadden. “That this day is not just about us, it’s about everyone at Harvard who has served, or will serve, or is serving right now.”Faust presented the newly commissioned officers with two books on behalf of the University, “No Man’s Land: Preparing for War and Peace in Post-9/11 America” by West Point Professor Elizabeth D. Samet, and “Very Good Lives: The Fringe Benefits of Failure and the Importance of Imagination” by J.K. Rowling. In her remarks, Faust also thanked them.“Many of your classmates will serve society, the nation, and the world in other ways,” Faust said. “But we honor you in this ceremony for undertaking a special calling grounded in sacrifice, commitment and, yes, danger. We honor you for honoring the tradition of national service that Harvard has so long embraced.”To read the full text of President Faust’s remarks, visit her website.last_img read more

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Students raise funds for clean water

first_imgThe women of Howard Hall raised close to $3,500 for The Water Project, a non-profit organization that provides distressed communities with access to clean water, during the third annual Totter for Water on Thursday and Friday. From 5 p.m. Thursday until 5 p.m. Friday, participants teeter-tottered for half-hour shifts on South Quad in order to solicit donations to build a well in Africa. “We have girls out there all 24 hours signed up to take shifts,” sophomore and Howard Hall president Claire Robinson said. “It brings attention to [the fundraiser], and we ask that people donate in order to totter. It’s kind of an attraction.” People also donated online, sophomore Sarah Cahalan, one of Howard Hall’s service commissioners, said. Online donations made before the event accounted for almost $2,700 of Totter for Water’s total proceeds. Approximately 90 Howard residents and 50 others participated in Totter for Water over the course of 48 shifts, Cahalan said. Robinson said she was impressed with the number of people that stopped by the event. “I even went out there at 4:30 in the morning and we had people out there,” she said. Howard Hall hosted African-themed events last week to prepare for Totter for Water, Robinson said. “We had African Mass [and] a speaker come talk to us about his work with the wells,” she said. “Then we also had African desserts and a water documentary, and finally we had a little kick-off party with the dorm mascot.” The speaker, Stephen Silliman, professor of civil engineering and geological sciences, spoke to Howard Hall residents Monday about his experience building wells in Benin, Cahalan said. Robinson said Silliman’s talk caused her and the service commissioners to consider donating Totter for Water’s proceeds to a nation in western Africa, but they did not decide what specific country or village the donations will benefit yet. “Previously, we have designated which village or country we want the well built for, but we haven’t made the decision yet this year,” Robinson said. “I think we’re going to try to establish ourselves within the community and donate to the same well every year, but I honestly don’t know.” Robinson and Cahalan said the event raised more money this year than in past years. “The past two years that we’ve done it [the fundraiser] made about $1,000 online, and we made $2,693 [this year], so that was really exciting,” Cahalan said. “Lots of people were coming by and interested in what we were doing.”last_img read more

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Enel begins commercial operation at 140MW wind farm in South Africa

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Afrik21:Enel Green Power is now injecting 140 MW into the power grid of the South African public company Eskom thanks to its new wind farm. The facility in Nxuba (Eastern Cape Province) was recently commissioned by the renewable energy subsidiary of the Italian Enel Group.On October 27th, 2020, Enel Green Power inaugurated the Nxuba wind farm in the Western Cape Province of South Africa. The 140 MW wind farm will come on stream approximately two years after the Italian Enel Group’s renewable energy subsidiary Enel began construction.Enel Green Power will operate the wind farm and inject the electricity produced into the grid of the South African public utility Eskom for 20 years, under a power purchase agreement (PPA) between the two companies.The Nxuba wind farm is one of five projects awarded to Enel Green Power under South Africa’s Renewable Energy Supply Programme (REIPPP). The other four parks are under development at Oyster Bay, Garob, Karusa and Soetwater. They will each have a capacity of 140 MW, giving a total output of 700 MW for the five wind farms. According to Enel Green Power, 460 GWh of wind power will be injected into the South African national electricity grid each year. The installations are also expected to prevent the emission of 500 000 tonnes of CO2 into the atmosphere over the same period.The implementation of the wind projects will require an investment of €1.2 billion. In 2018, Enel Green Power has signed financing agreements with Nedbank and Absa. The two South African banks lent 950 million euros, i.e. 80% of the cost of the project. The remaining €250 million will be invested by Enel Green Power under equity.[Inès Magoum]More: Enel Green Power inaugurates its 140MW Nxuba wind farm Enel begins commercial operation at 140MW wind farm in South Africalast_img read more

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