Category: wnzdozct

Uganda Clays Limited (UCL.ug) 2004 Annual Report

first_imgUganda Clays Limited (UCL.ug) listed on the Uganda Securities Exchange under the Building & Associated sector has released it’s 2004 annual report.For more information about Uganda Clays Limited (UCL.ug) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Uganda Clays Limited (UCL.ug) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Uganda Clays Limited (UCL.ug)  2004 annual report.Company ProfileUganda Clays Limited manufactures and markets clay products for the building and construction industry in Uganda. Its product offering ranges from roofing tiles, bricks and floor tiles to decorative grilles, ventilators, pipes and suspended floor units and partition blocks. The company supplies the local building trade in Uganda and exports products to Kenya, Tanzania, Burundi, Rwanda, the DRC and South Sudan. Uganda Clays Limited was founded in 1950 and its head office is in Kampala, Uganda. Uganda Clays Limited is listed on the Uganda Securities Exchangelast_img read more

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TATEPA Limited (TATEPA.tz) 2011 Annual Report

first_imgTATEPA Limited (TATEPA.tz) listed on the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange under the Agri-industrial sector has released it’s 2011 annual report.For more information about TATEPA Limited (TATEPA.tz) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the TATEPA Limited (TATEPA.tz) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: TATEPA Limited (TATEPA.tz)  2011 annual report.Company ProfileTanzania Tea Packers Limited (TATEPA) is an agricultural holding company involved in growing, processing, blending, packing and selling tea in Tanzania and for international export. The company also has interests in growing and distributing avocadoes and tropical fruit. Tatepa Limited holds a 75% stake in Wakulima Tea Company Limited which grows, processes and sells tea for local and export markets; a 74.3% stake in Rungwe Avocado Company Limited which grows, packs and exports avocadoes; and a 54.4% stake in Freshfields Investments Limited. Other subsidiary companies include Kibena Tea Limited which grows and processes tea and Chai Bora Limited which blends, packages and markets packed tea in Tanzania and for international export. TATEPA Limited is listed on the Dar es Salam Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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RioZim Limited (RIOZ.zw) 2011 Circular

first_imgRioZim Limited (RIOZ.zw) listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange under the Mining sector has released it’s 2011 circular For more information about RioZim Limited (RIOZ.zw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the RioZim Limited (RIOZ.zw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: RioZim Limited (RIOZ.zw)  2011 circular Company ProfileRioZim is an integrated mining and metallurgical company in Zimbabwe with an extensive portfolio of resources in gold, base metals, diamonds, coal and chrome. It mining operations include Renco Gold Mine in Masvingo Province, and Cam & Motor Gold Mine and Empress Nickel Refinery; both in the Mashonaland West Province. RioZim also has interests in Sengwa Colliery (Private) Limited with coal assets in Gokwe North; Murowa Diamonds (Private) Limited with operations in Zvishavane; and Marnatha ferrochrome refinery in Kadoma. RioZim separated from its parent company, Rio Tinto plc, in 2004 to become a wholly-owned Zimbabwean company. Its subsidiaries include RioGold (Private) Limited, RioZim Base Metals (Private) Limited and RioDiamonds (Private) Limited. RioZim Group Limited is listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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Nigerian Aviation Handling Company Plc (NAHCO.ng) Q32013 Interim Report

first_imgNigerian Aviation Handling Company Plc (NAHCO.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Transport sector has released it’s 2013 interim results for the third quarter.For more information about Nigerian Aviation Handling Company Plc (NAHCO.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Nigerian Aviation Handling Company Plc (NAHCO.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Nigerian Aviation Handling Company Plc (NAHCO.ng)  2013 interim results for the third quarter.Company ProfileNigerian Aviation Handling Company Plc (nahco aviance) is an investment holding company in Nigeria with business interests in aviation services and support. This includes aviation cargo, aircraft handling, passenger facilitation, crew transportation and aviation training. The company was established in 1979 as the sole ground handler at the newly-commissioned Murtala Muhammed International Airport in Lagos. Today, Nigerian Aviation Handling Company Plc handles 70% of domestic and foreign airlines operating in Nigeria encompassing 35 airlines at 9 airports across Nigeria. Subsidiary companies include Mainland Cargo Options and Nahco Power Energy and Infrastructure. The Federal Government through Federal Airports Authority of Nigeria (FAAN) has a 60% equity stake in the aviation enterprise. The remaining 40% is held by Air France, British Airways, Sabena and Lufthansa. The company’s head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. Nigerian Aviation Handling Company Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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Britam Holdings Limited (BRIT.ke) HY2018 Interim Report

first_imgBritam Holdings Limited (BRIT.ke) listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchange under the Investment sector has released it’s 2018 interim results for the half year.For more information about Britam Holdings Limited (BRIT.ke) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Britam Holdings Limited (BRIT.ke) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Britam Holdings Limited (BRIT.ke)  2018 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileBritam Holdings Limited is an investment holding company providing solutions for insurance, investment management and property management for the personal, commercial and corporate sectors. The company services markets in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda, South Sudan, Malawi and Mozambique. Britam Holdings Limited also offers solutions for short- and long-term insurance, asset management and property management. Personal and corporate solutions are available for individual and group life, pension, medical, micro and general insurance. Its insurance product offering covers unit-linked products and plans for education, whole-life plans, life, critical illness, disability as well as products covering fire, aviation, engineering, motor, marine, personal accidents, liability, theft and workers compensation. Britam Holdings Limited specialist divisions deal with discretionary/segregated portfolio management, wealth management and unit trusts. The company has interests in purchasing and selling properties and developing, leasing or renting land. Formerly known as British-American Investments Company (Kenya) Limited when it was founded in 1920, the company changed its name to Britam Holdings Limited in 2015. The company head office is in Nairobi, Kenya. Britam Holdings Limited is listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchangelast_img read more

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Rugby World – July 2011 edition contents

first_imgClick here to find out where to buy Rugby World Or perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS [imagebrowser id=8]This month’s Rugby World is packed to the rafters with everything a rugby fan or player could want. It’s a whopping 200 pages including the first part of our World Cup Guide, which looks at Ireland’s group giving you in-depth information on the Irish alongside USA, Russia, Italy and Australia.In the main body of the magazine we have a huge number of exclusive interviews with some of the biggest names in the game including a fascinating interview with the man many love to hate – Dylan Hartley. As the World Cup looms on the horizon we also speak to Alun Wyn Jones, Kelly Brown, Gordon D’Arcy, Chris Budgen, Toby Booth, Jonathan Davies, Ollie Phillips  while explaining exactly why Leinster won the Heineken Cup and Quins the Amlin Challenge Cup. We also visit the Worcester Warriors for their promotion party, reveal the date of the new Help for Heroes match in an interview with Simon Halliday, give you a fascinating history of the rugby, and publish our unique Champions Section which features the winners of every League in England.———————————————————————————————————————————————–The Front Row…30 minutes with Ollie Phillips: The self proclaimed housewife to James HaskellRugby World Awards: As these are the only awards that span the globe, taking in the season from September to May. We reveal our winners…Junior World Cup preview : Yes! The U20 Skipper Alex Gray tells Katie Field why his side can become world championMunster cycle ride: The province are tackling news of Paul Darbyshire’s illness head on. You can join them, says Bea AspreyMiddlesex Sevens: Tradition and the future will collide at next month’s Middlesex Charity SevensToby Booth: The London Irish coach on who’s impressed this seasonJim Calder: The former Scotland great says Edinburgh can fight backSimon Halliday: Find out about rugby’s latest fund-raiser for Help for HeroesFrank Keating: Richard Parks’s 737 Challenge typifies a sport that inspires great and charitable deedsSpotlight on…Anthony Allen: The midfield maestro has gone from dommed Test debutant to Leicester linchpin, writes John WesterbyJonathan Davies: The Wales centre hopes his fruitful season will ensure him a World Cup place. Sarah Mockford reportsEric Elwood: The coach tells Bea Asprey why he’s relishing the arrival of Heineken Cup rugby at Connacht next termGraeme Morrison: Richard Bath finds the Glasgow centre unusually restless ahead of Scotland’s World Cup Squad announcementTom Shanklin on injuries and his future after rugbyThe Centres…Dylan Hartley: The Northampton hooker finally feels worthy enough to wear the England jerseyAlun Wyn Jones: Why the Wales lock has turned down lucrative offers to stay put at the Ospreyscenter_img Kelly Brown: The Scotland and Saracens star has been tackling on- and off-pitch issues this seasonGordon D’arcy: One half of Ireland’s centre partnership would do anything for his team-matesTechnical Zone: Dan Cottrell explains the principles of good support play – and try out his rugby gameMini Rugby: If your minis can’t wait to get kicking, get them playing this game of ForcebackFitness Zone: Get your hydration right, plus a workout to help you start preparing for next seasonEngland Squad: Stuart Barnes reveals the 30 players he would take to New Zealand for the World CupEuropean Finals: Relive the Heineken and Amlin Challenge Cup finals, and find out how the best teams wonThe Tourist: We visit Worcester’s Sixways stadium and welcome the club back to the PremiershipPundits’ Panel: Ieuan Evans, Sean Fitzpatrick, Dean Ryan and Michael Lynagh discuss all things rugbyWorld Cup Ball: We meet the inventor who’s pushing the boundaries in the world of rugby ball technologyChris Budgen: The Exeter Chief leads a very different life off the pitch. He opens up about AfghanistanTom Shanklin: The former centre is embarking on a new career, but still has some ideas for rugby’s futureThe Backs…Club Guide: This month we celebrate league champions from across the country. Plus we name our 2010-11 Team of the Year and School of the YearNaked Truth: Ceri Jones on his path from Newport to WorcesterArmchair Zone: A Fan’s Guide to World Rugby, plus a round-up of the latest books and products on the marketTour Tale: Why did these travellers get more than they’d bargained for?———————————————————————————————————————————————–Click here to subscribe to Rugby Worldlast_img read more

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Journalist missing for one week in Michoacán state

first_imgNews November 19, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Journalist missing for one week in Michoacán state News NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say MexicoAmericas RSF_en Follow the news on Mexico MexicoAmericas Receive email alerts Reports (Photo: Cambio newspaper) to go further Organisation Help by sharing this information Reporter murdered in northwestern Mexico’s Sonora state News May 13, 2021 Find out more May 5, 2021 Find out more Fears have been raised for the safety of journalist María Esther Aguilar Cansimbe of the local daily El Diario de Zamora, in Michoacán state, south-western Mexico, who went missing a week ago.The 32-year-old, who has been covering crime stories for four years, left her home in Zamora on 11 November promising her two young daughters she would not be long, shortly after receiving a mystery phone call. She has not been seen since.“This is the third case of a journalist disappearing in one of the most dangerous regions of the world, where a federal offensive against drug trafficking was launched in December 2006,” Reporters Without Borders said. Nine journalists have gone missing without trace in Mexico since 2000.“As a crime specialist, Aguilar Cansimbe ran major risks. We hope that this investigation can progress rapidly and will not stall as did those into the disappearances in the same state of journalists José Antonio García Apac, on 20 November 2006, and Mauricio Estrada Zamora, on 12 February 2008 (see report Behind the scenes of impunity of 28 September 2009).“We are also waiting to see what action the Michoacán judicial authorities and the new federal justice minister, Arturo Chávez Chávez, plan on taking to resolve these cases,” the worldwide press freedom organisation said. The journalist’s family took the case to the sub-delegation of the state prosecutor’s office. Regional justice officials told her anxious colleagues on 17 November that they had referred the case up to the federal level.Aguilar, who is married to a former public security director in the municipality of Jacona, had recently published an article about a case of abuse of authority implicating the Zamora police chief, Lieutenant Jorge Arturo Cambroni Torres, who was dismissed shortly afterwards. Reporters Without Borders said it hoped that this lead would be explored as a first priority. The organisation also promised to help provide legal assistance for the families of journalists who have gone missing in Michoacán state. The journalist’s disappearance coincides with the first anniversary of the murder of Armando Rodríguez Carreón, of the daily El Diario, killed in Ciudad Juárez in northern Mexico on 13 November 2008.A total of 56 journalists have been killed and nine have gone missing in Mexico since 2000. It is the continent’s most dangerous country for journalists and was ranked 137th out of 175 countries in Reporters Without Borders 2009 world press freedom index. 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies April 28, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Legal Flaws On The Mandatory Imposition Of Aarogya Setu App

first_imgColumnsLegal Flaws On The Mandatory Imposition Of Aarogya Setu App Gautam Bhatia2 May 2020 10:18 PMShare This – xThe extension of the “nationwide lockdown” by another two weeks has brought with it a slew of further directions under the National Disaster Management Act. Many of these directions exacerbate the problems pointed out in previous posts. For example, unlike previous directions, this one actually does impose a physical curfew (between 7PM and 7AM), and directs local authorities to pass…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe extension of the “nationwide lockdown” by another two weeks has brought with it a slew of further directions under the National Disaster Management Act. Many of these directions exacerbate the problems pointed out in previous posts. For example, unlike previous directions, this one actually does impose a physical curfew (between 7PM and 7AM), and directs local authorities to pass necessary orders implementing it. This particular direction lies at the intersection of rule by executive decree and the undermining of federalism, as discussed previously. In this post, however, I want to briefly consider Guideline 15 of Annexure 1, which mandates the use of the government’s contact tracing app – Aarogya Setu – for all private and public employees, and obligates employers to ensure 100% coverage.To those who have followed the many twists and turns of the Aadhaar story, this metamorphosis from “voluntary” to “voluntary-mandatory” to “effectively mandatory” will have a familiar ring – the pandemic probably just accelerated the pace of transformation from a few years to a few weeks. The mandatory imposition of Aarogya Setu through executive decree, however, suffers from serious legal problems, discussed below.The Absence of Anchoring LegislationAs pointed out repeatedly on this blog, the legal framework for the government’s pandemic management strategy has been the National Disaster Management Act, which has an umbrella clause permitting the issuance of guidelines and directions aimed at addressing disasters. Previously on this blog, we have discussed the separation of powers and other democratic problems that come with using vague enabling legislation to anchor a wide-reaching executive response. When it comes to the infringing of rights, however, the problem is even more acute: Part III of the Constitution requires that even before we get to the discussion of whether a rights violation is justified or not, there must exist a law that authorises it. Any such law has to be specific and explicit with respect to the rights that it seeks to infringe, the bases of infringement, the procedural safeguards that it establishes, and so on.The NDMA cannot be such a law, because it says absolutely nothing about the circumstances, manner, and limitations under which the government is authorised to limit or infringe civil rights (in this case, the right to privacy). The enabling clauses do not help, because – as pointed out above – they are generic enough so as to permit just about any executive decree that (the executive believes) is required to tackle the disaster. If the NDMA was indeed accepted as the basis, then this would effectively subvert the legality requirement entirely and across the board: there could, hypothetically, be one single umbrella legislation that stipulates that “the government may do anything that it believes is reasonable to achieve the public interest” , and do away with any further need for lawmaking in toto. This, however, is the very definition of rule by executive, instead of the rule by and of law.It should be noted that the proposition I am advancing here is a very basic one. Last week, for example, the High Court of Kerala refused to allow the government to cut salaries without specific legislation authorising it (the Court correctly observed that the existing provisions of the Epidemics Act and the Kerala Covid-19 Ordinance were far too generic to authorise such a step). We shall discuss the judgment of the Kerala High Court in a subsequent post, but for now, suffice it to say that this is not just a basic proposition under Indian law, but a basic proposition everywhere. The Israeli High Court – not exactly known for being a hotbed of bleeding-heart liberal jurisprudence – held a few days ago that the Shin Bet could not engage in surveillance without authorising legislation. A few months ago, the High Court of Kenya held that GPS Coordinates and DNA samples could not be collected under cover of a general law, but – at the very least – would require “anchoring legislation” to do so.The requirement of specific legislation is not a mere procedural quibble, but a crucial constitutional point. One, of course, is the separation of powers issue, which we have discussed before: if the State is going to mandate an intrusive, data-collecting app upon its citizens, then the least that ought to be done is that it be authorised by the citizens’ elected representatives, in Parliament. Equally importantly, however, a hypothetical “Aarogya Setu law” will necessarily have to demonstrate constitutional compliance with respect to data protection principles. A good example of this – again – is the history of Aadhaar: once it became clear to the government that it actually had to pass an Aadhaar Act, the accompanying infrastructure – including limitations upon the use of Aadhaar – also had to be considered. Writing out these provision in law also enabled an informed challenge in Court, where at least a part of the Act was struck down for being unconstitutional (I need not go over that again here). Blithely mandating Aarogya Setu in one sentence through an executive decree tears the constitutional architecture to shreds.The Proportionality Test(s)Given the government’s penchant for Ordinances (the Kerala government has, for example, issued an ordinance to get around the High Court’s salaries judgment), the requirement of legislation is unlikely to present an effective check upon executive abuse. That, however, makes it important to highlight that there exist serious substantive constitutional concerns with the mandatory use of the Aarogya Setu app.As is well known, the proportionality standard for adjudicating whether a violation of the right to privacy is justified or not has four prongs: legality (requirement of a law, with a legitimate purpose), suitability (the government’s action must be suitable for addressing the problem, i.e., there must be a rational relationship between means and ends), necessity (i.e., it must be the least restrictive alternative), and proportionality stricto sensu (there must be a balance between the extent to which rights are infringed and the State’s legitimate purpose).There is, by now, extensive literature on the question of the very effectiveness of contact-tracing apps to fight a pandemic such as Covid-19. As this Brookings Paper shows, (a) contact tracing is effective where there exists large-scale testing capacity and less spread (the first condition certainly does not exist in India today); (b) there is a high risk of false positives and false negatives, something that gets worse as the population size increases (recent examples in India bear testimony to this); (c) the absence of complete smartphone penetration can defeat the purpose (particularly true for India) (the authors also point out other risks, such as social stigmatisation). It is, therefore, an open question whether the second limb of the proportionality test – suitability/rationality – is satisfied.The problem grows more severe when we come to the necessity prong (discussed previously on this blog as well). The data collection practices of the Aarogya Setu app – and how they fall short of constitutional standards – have already been discussed extensively (see here, here, here, and here). Now, it is not the purpose of this post to engage in a detailed technical discussion about whether the Aarogya Setu app complies with the third limb of the proportionality standard or not (much of that work may be accessed in the links above). However, there is a broader legal point that needs to be noted. This is the issue of burden: it is well-established under Indian constitutional jurisprudence – most recently in the Aadhaar judgment – that once a prima facie violation of privacy has been demonstrated, the burden of justification (under the proportionality standard) shifts to the State. In other words, it is for the State to show that the suitability and necessity prong of the proportionality standard are satisfied. A necessary corollary of this is that as far as the suitability prong goes, the State cannot mandate the use of a privacy infringing app before it is first demonstrably established that a means-ends relationship actually exists. Thus, if – as the Brookings analysis shows – there is a non-trivial likelihood that the app in question cannot achieve the very (legitimate) purpose that it is designed for, it cannot be made mandatory.Secondly, as far as the necessity prong goes, it creates a constitutional obligation upon the State to be transparent about the basis for choosing this app, designed in this way. Were less intrusive alternatives considered (see the IFF working paper linked above)? If so, were they found non-suitable for the goal? If not, why were they rejected? And even if not, why is there not a mandatory sunset clause here? Once again, this is not a radical legal proposition: in the Aadhaar judgment, the mandatory linking of bank accounts with Aadhaar was struck down precisely on the basis that there existed less restrictive alternatives, and that the government had comprehensively failed to provide any reasons why they had not been considered. It is fair to say that if the government cannot even show why it has chosen a more intrusive data collecting app over a less intrusive alternative (that exists), then it is in no sense a constitutionally justified decision.ConclusionThe government directive mandating Aarogya Setu for all public and private employees suffers from serious legal flaws. In the absence of a specific anchoring legislation, it fails the first limb of the proportionality test. And on more substantive grounds, the government bears the burden of showing that the design of the app satisfies both the suitability and the necessity prongs of the test – a burden that, thus far, remains undischarged (indeed, going by blithe ministerial statements about how the app might continue to be in use for two years, there seems to be very little appetite in the government to even attempt to discharge that burden). There would, therefore, appear to be excellent legal grounds for a challenge to the NDMA Direction; of course, the prospect of any such challenge succeeding at a time when the Court appears to have withdrawn itself from its task of rights adjudication, is another matter.Gautam Bhatia is a Constitutional Scholar and Delhi Based LawyerViews Are Personal OnlyThis article was first published here Next Storylast_img read more

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Minister urged to address hospital cancellations issue in northwest

first_img Harps come back to win in Waterford FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty DL Debate – 24/05/21 Previous articleFalcarragh area suffers yet another water outageNext articleBreaking: Emergency services attending fire in Raphoe News Highland Facebook Facebook A South Donegal TD says it’s unfair that people in the North West with hospital procedures booked in Galway can have them cancelled without notice.In the Dail, Deputy Eamon Scanlon told Minister Heather Humphries that people can find themselves facing considerable expense, not to mention the impact on their health.Minister Humphries promised that the issue would be reviewed by Minister Simon Harris:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/scanlgfgfhgfhgfon7am.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Google+ Pinterest Twittercenter_img Minister urged to address hospital cancellations issue in northwest WhatsApp Google+ By News Highland – May 29, 2019 AudioHomepage BannerNews WhatsApp Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction Twitter Pinterest News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24thlast_img read more

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Possible link between AstraZeneca vaccine and blood clots – EMA

first_imgHomepage BannerNews Possible link between AstraZeneca vaccine and blood clots – EMA Previous articleMcIlroy still on rebuilding roadNext articleDepartment of Social Protection issues warning about scam callers News Highland Twitter Facebook Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Pinterest DL Debate – 24/05/21 Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA There is a possible link between the AstraZeneca vaccine and blood clots, according to the European Medicines Agency.The EMA’s safety committee says unusual blood clots with low blood platelets should be listed as very rare side effects of the vaccine.The organisation has published the findings of its review today. Twitter WhatsAppcenter_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic WhatsApp Facebook Pinterest By News Highland – April 7, 2021 Google+ Harps come back to win in Waterford Google+ News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th last_img read more

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