Category: dpbipflf

One More Room / ANTNA

first_imgSave this picture!© Jaime Navarro+ 11Curated by Danae Santibañez Share Architects: ANTNA Area Area of this architecture project One More Room / ANTNA Area:  16 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Photographs:  Jaime Navarro One More Room / ANTNASave this projectSaveOne More Room / ANTNA Diego Rivero Borrell, Santiago Arroyo CopySocial Housing, Extension•Temixco, Mexico ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/894034/one-more-room-antna Clipboard Photographs 2017 Lead Architects: center_img Year:  City:TemixcoCountry:MexicoMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Jaime NavarroRecommended ProductsWoodEGGERLaminatesWoodLunawoodThermowood FacadesWoodStructureCraftEngineering – Architectural & FreeformEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesRodecaRound Facade at Omnisport Arena ApeldoornText description provided by the architects. A housing expansion prototype that aims to add a 16 sqm room, on the roof of social houses that currently have problems of overcrowding, as they originally have only one bedroom. Save this picture!Assembly and Installation of Prefabricated WallsSave this picture!Floor PlanSave this picture!Assembly and Installation of CoveringAs this is a construction proposed in wood, it seeks to explore this material from its structural aspect, insulation, light, and a logical building system. In addition to it, this prototype opens a research around the potential of this resource to activate a sustainable economy in the country, which with the correct use of its forests and jungles, new local economies can be detonated, as well as schemes that can focus on the housing crisis, unemployment, and social marginalization. Save this picture!© Jaime NavarroSave this picture!SectionThe wooden structure is designed by a system of structural frames that join with an assembled grid of beams that support the roof. An arrangement of sliding doors in the lateral facade gives a natural crossed ventilation, that apart from lowering the interior temperature, it promotes an opening of the interior to the urban setting. Save this picture!© Jaime NavarroProject gallerySee allShow lessScholars’ Prize in Architecture 2019-20Student CompetitionsBig Ideas for Small Lots NYC | Housing Design CompetitionBuilt Projects & MasterplansProject locationAddress:Temixco, Morelos, MexicoLocation to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Share ArchDaily Mexico “COPY” Social Housing Projects ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/894034/one-more-room-antna Clipboard “COPY” CopyAbout this officeANTNAOfficeFollowProductsWoodConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureSocial HousingRefurbishmentExtensionTemixcoMexicoPublished on February 06, 2019Cite: “One More Room / ANTNA” [Un Cuarto Más / ANTNA] 06 Feb 2019. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPartitionsSkyfoldChoosing the Skyfold Wall for Your SpaceGlass3MSun Control Window Film in MarkthalBathroom AccessorieshansgroheBath & Shower ThermostatsCabinetsFlorenseCabinet – FloAirWood Boards / HPL PanelsBruagStair Railing – CELLON®LightsLouis PoulsenOutdoor Lighting – Flindt GardenBathroom AccessoriesBradley Corporation USAHigh Speed Hand Dryers – Aerix+BoardsForestOneLaminate – EGGER laminatesAcousticSchöckStaircase Insulation – Tronsole®Metal PanelsRHEINZINKPanel Systems – Horizontal PanelWall / Ceiling LightsA-LightAccolade Wall Light at River Dental OfficeBricksStröherClinker Brick Slips – StiltreuMore products »Save想阅读文章的中文版本吗?多一个房间 / ANTNA是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

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Purdue Workshop to Tackle Issues Faced by Family Farms

first_img By Andy Eubank – Dec 4, 2012 SHARE Purdue Workshop to Tackle Issues Faced by Family Farms A Purdue University workshop can help farmers who are part of a family business explore crucial management and relationship issues that families need to address for future successes.The Center for Commercial Agriculture will offer “Farming into the Next Generation” Feb. 12-13.Brent Gloy, the center’s director, said the two-day workshop is intended for farmers who are working together with other family members and for those who want to add more family members to the business.“Running a family farming business together can be a challenging process for both the younger and older generations,” Gloy said. “This workshop will help families build stronger management teams and family relationships, and help them identify techniques and planning processes that can resolve conflict and position the farm business for success for another generation.”Program instructors are Bernie Erven, professor emeritus of agricultural economics at Ohio State University, and Bob Milligan, senior consultant at Dairy Strategies LLC and professor emeritus at Cornell University.“Our instructors are the two leading experts in the country on this topic and bring a wealth of experience and knowledge to the workshop,” Gloy said. “Participants will leave better prepared to successfully farm into the next generation.”The dynamics in a family business are different than those at a corporation because co-workers are also family members, a situation that can strain relationships. The workshop will help attendees improve their communication and conflict-resolution skills.The workshop will be divided into four sections: the family business, relationship challenges in family businesses, farm family case studies and summary messages.Participants who register before Jan. 1 get the discounted rate of $1,000. After that deadline, the fee is $1,150.Register online and for more information, contact Aissa Good, senior project manager at the center, at [email protected] or 765-496-3884.Source: Purdue Ag Communications Previous articleVote Soon for USFRA Faces Of Farming And Ranching WinnersNext articleASA Urges Yes Vote on Russia PNTR Bill Andy Eubank Facebook Twitter Home Indiana Agriculture News Purdue Workshop to Tackle Issues Faced by Family Farms SHARE Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Could Money for Rural Broadband be Included in a COVID Relief…

first_img Facebook Twitter Audio Playerhttps://www.hoosieragtoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/broadband-wrap.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.The lack of rural broadband throughout Indiana has been highlighted during this COVID-19 pandemic as students had to do e-learning and adults were asked to work from home.“Broadband is so important. It connects us to the world. It helps with economic development. It’s a tool that every state and every community needs, and yet, in rural areas, it’s been promised forever and, you know, baby steps when it comes to delivering,” says Indiana Congresswoman Jackie Walorski (R-IN 2nd District).She says she feels the pain of those without broadband access.“Get this- so I live in a rural area. I’m a member of Congress. I have to be able to be virtual constantly, for hours at a time, and I can’t even do that from my house anymore. I have to go into another building close to my office in Mishawaka to have a strong enough signal to even do my job. I mean, that is just such a shame. I think it’s crazy.”Walorski says that before COVID, there was a mutual momentum between Democrats and Republicans in both the House and Senate to move on an infrastructure bill that would include money for rural broadband. She and Indiana Congressman Jim Banks (R-IN 3rd District) are still both holding out hope for an infrastructure package this year.“Whatever the next relief bill looks like, I’m hoping that it’ll be an infrastructure related bill. That’s what I’ve been pushing for. When it comes to infrastructure, a key component of infrastructure should be rural broadband,” says Banks. “So, I made it clear to my leadership, I’m not going to support anything moving forward, especially an infrastructure bill, that doesn’t include a major boost for rural broadband as a key component.”Walorski and Banks both addressed corn and soybean growers last week via a webinar hosted by the Indiana Soybean Alliance and the Indiana Corn Growers Association. By Eric Pfeiffer – Jun 21, 2020 Could Money for Rural Broadband be Included in a COVID Relief Bill? SHARE Home Indiana Agriculture News Could Money for Rural Broadband be Included in a COVID Relief Bill? SHARE Previous articleCommentary: Who is Really in Charge Here?Next articleWhether Money for Rural Broadband Could be Included in a COVID Relief Bill on the HAT Monday Podcast Eric Pfeiffer Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Renovated library looks to the future

first_imgTwitter Hank Kilgorehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/hank-kilgore/ Hank Kilgorehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/hank-kilgore/ Website| + posts TCU VGP (Ep. 19 – Xbox Game Pass, Horizon Impressions and more) The new section of the library is only one month away from completion. Linkedin Twitter ReddIt TCU Sizzle Reel (Ep. 16 – Legion, Stranger Things 2 and more) ReddIt Hank Kilgore Linkedin Hank Kilgorehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/hank-kilgore/ TCU VGP (Ep. 18 – The Cost of Gaming, State of DLC and more) The College of Science and Engineering Dean, Phil Hartman, retires after 40 consecutive years printThe Mary Couts Burnett Library is set to be finished with its renovations by Oct. 1 and will include new areas for student study.Dean of the library, June Koelker said the finished library will feature substantially more group study rooms and study spaces.Some of the new social spaces include an expanded Bistro Burnett, the Lizard Lounge, which features a social space for students to learn from one another via presentations and talks, an outdoor patio between the library and Rees-Jones Hall, and a screening room for film study, Koelker said.She added that there will also be many technology-centered areas. These include a GIGA Lab featuring multimedia editing stations in soundproof rooms, a Fab Lab featuring 3D printing, an IT department, a visualization lab, and a technology room called the Sandbox.The Sandbox is a section of the library featuring new technologies for students to examine, use, learn, and try out before deciding if they want to purchase it, Koelker said.“Campus IT is going to get with some technology companies and vendors and bring samples of new technology here so people can touch, and play, and try out,” Koelker said. “It’s a way of seeing or using something in a practice way before buying it.”The new library will have private spaces for graduate students to study and work on dissertations.There will also be two bridges on the second floor that connect the library to Rees-Jones Hall, Koelker said.Koelker said the expanded library will be very helpful for students to learn and study from new angles.“It’s a dream come true,” Koelker said. “It’s wonderful because, as a librarian, students were using the study rooms and books, but the facilities couldn’t keep up with what we needed, and now they can.”Students said they have been looking forward to the new library’s additional space.“Right now, there are so many people, but just no space,” junior child development major, Emily Fuller said.“It can get cramped in there at times, so I’m looking forward to the additional space,” junior biology major, Adam Hood said. “I’m also looking forward to the Sandbox and the 3D printing station.”There will be a special campus-wide event for the library’s opening on Oct. 1. Hank Kilgorehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/hank-kilgore/ Previous articleCampus Carry: What YOU need to knowNext articleTCU welcomes new class of ROTC Hank Kilgore RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TCU VGP (Ep. 17 – Valentine’s Updates, Overwatch and more) Facebook Facebook TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Hank Kilgore is a senior Journalism major and FTDM minor from Lafayette, Louisiana. He is currently Editor of The Skiff and the Student Life and Entertainment Managing Editor for TCU 360. You can often find him anywhere a superhero movie is being played. TCU Frog Camps returning to more traditional look this summerlast_img read more

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Four arrested after investigation involving marijuana, more than 11 grams of cocaine

first_img Pinterest Four arrested after investigation involving marijuana, more than 11 grams of cocaine Facebook WhatsApp Twitter Previous articleOPD releases names, details in rollover accidentNext articleSheds destroyed but no residences affected in Friday fire admin Diamonique Justice, top left; John Sanchez, top right; Marcus McCowan, bottom left; Miguel Sanchez, bottom right. Odessa police arrested four men April 6 in Odessa as part of a narcotics investigation involving marijuana, firearms and more than 11 grams of cocaine.John Anthony Sanchez, 17, was charged with first-degree felony manufacture or delivery of a controlled substance, while he and Marcus Dwayne McCowan, 33, and Diamonique Lashawn Justice, 17, were charged with misdemeanor evading arrest or detention and misdemeanor possession of marijuana. Miguel Angel Sanchez, 20, was also charged with misdemeanor possession of marijuana.An OPD release stated officers found four bags of cocaine weighing about 11.1 grams in a residence that two of the men ran into while evading officers, along with plastic baggies, a container of marijuana, a digital scale, a Glock handgun and case, a rifle, multiple identification cards and several counterfeit $100 bills.The release stated that on April 6, officers observed a Lexus traveling with an expired registration before it pulled into a driveway in the 2700 block of Chestnut Avenue, then officers observed one man exit the vehicle with a clear container containing marijuana while another man smoked marijuana. As officers activated their lights in front of the residence, the three men who were in the vehicle immediately fled on foot.John Sanchez ran into a residential backyard and jumped over a fence before he was caught and placed into custody. McCowan and Justice ran into the residence but were caught and placed into custody. Miguel Sanchez was in the residence and was detained pending further investigation.While in the residence, officers saw the marijuana, baggies, scale, firearms and other items, according to the release, prompting Odessa police to obtain a search warrant for the residence.Once the search warrant was executed, officers found the bags of cocaine, the release states. The release states investigation revealed that the cocaine belonged to John Sanchez, while all four men were found to be in possession of marijuana. All four were arrested.Jail records show John Sanchez was released April 10 on bonds totaling $52,000. McCowan was released April 8 on bonds totaling $2,500, while Justice was released April 6 on bonds totaling $1,500 and Miguel Sanchez was released April 6 on a $500 bond. Twitter By admin – April 13, 2018 Local NewsCrime Pinterest WhatsApp Facebooklast_img read more

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Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Thursday October 25th

first_img Previous articleOver 300 fireworks recovered from Saoradh offices in DerryNext articleKilmacrenan/ Termon school transport issue remains unresolved News Highland Twitter Facebook Google+ RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty Pinterest Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Thursday October 25th:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/25news.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Twitter WhatsApp By News Highland – October 25, 2018 center_img Facebook FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 Pinterest Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction Google+ Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Thursday October 25th DL Debate – 24/05/21 AudioHomepage BannerNews Harps come back to win in Waterford News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24thlast_img read more

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Brutal Arctic blast overtakes eastern US with wind chill falling to -30 degrees in some areas

first_imgABC News(NEW YORK) — Brutally cold temperatures and whipping winds swept through the eastern U.S. Monday.Temperatures Monday morning were 30 to 40 degrees colder than just a day earlier in some areas. In Philadelphia, it was 48 degrees on Sunday morning and a biting 12 degrees on Monday.Parts of the Northeast could see wind gusts up to 50 mph and wind chills are expected to remain dangerously cold all day.Wind chills Monday morning fell to:minus 17 F in New York Cityminus 16 F in Bostonminus 19 F in Hartfordminus 30 F in Albany, New Yorkminus 10 F in PhiladelphiaThe forecastThe frigid temperatures will be sticking around for Tuesday morning. Wind chills are forecast to be below zero across New England and in the single digits and teens in the South.The East Coast will experience milder temperatures on Wednesday ahead of another storm later in the week.This new storm was in the Rockies Monday, bringing snow and wind from Salt Lake City to Denver and Montana.The storm will move into the Central Plains and Midwest on Tuesday with snow from Omaha to Minneapolis and Green Bay.Late Tuesday into Wednesday the snow will head across the Great Lakes from Michigan to western New York.Some icy conditions are possible in the interior Northeast Wednesday, before temperatures warm up and the weather turns into rain from Florida to Maine.Behind that storm, another shot of arctic air will move in, with dangerous cold expected for the Midwest Thursday night into Friday.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Former Dallas cop claims self-defense as apartment mix-up murder trial begins

first_imgKuzma/iStock(DALLAS) — The trial of a white former Dallas police officer who fatally shot an unarmed black man when she mistook his apartment for her own got underway Monday with a prosecutor telling a jury the officer fired first without making any effort to de-escalate the situation and a defense attorney countering that the exhausted officer made “innocent mistakes” that led her to fear for her life.In a case that sparked days of protests in Dallas and calls for justice from the victim’s family in the Caribbean, fired Dallas Police officer Amber Guyger, 31, is charged with murder stemming from the September 2018 fatal shooting of Botham “Bo” Jean at the South Side Flats apartment complex in Dallas.But even before the trial began Monday, Guyger’s defense team requested the judge to declare a mistrial, arguing Dallas County District Attorney John Creuzot violated a gag order by talking about the case in a TV interview aired Sunday night.After reviewing the interview and polling the jurors in private on whether they saw Creuzot’s interview on TV, Dallas County District Court Judge Tammy Kemp overruled the defense motion and ordered the trial to proceed. The judge also ordered the jury to be sequestered for the duration of the trial, which is expected to last up to two weeks.‘A wonderful, decent man’In his opening argument, Dallas County Assistant District Attorney Jason Hermus told the jurors that Jean, an accountant for the international auditing firm PricewaterhouseCoopers, was “a wonderful, decent man” and showed the jury a large photo of a smiling Jean posing while dressed in a sweater.Hermus pointed out Jean’s mother, father, brother, sister and grandmother seated in the courtroom gallery.“On Sept. 6, 2018, Bo was 26 years old, and he was sitting inside of his apartment, the sanctuary of his own home at the South Side Flats. He was doing no harm to anybody, which was his way,” Hermus said. “As a matter of fact, the evidence is going to show you that he was sitting in his living room in shorts and a T-shirt, watching TV, eating a bowl of vanilla ice cream, which any one of us would have been doing. When all of a sudden Amber Guyger comes through his front door uninvited.”Hermus said the evidence would show that Guyger’s intrusion scared Jean, prompting him to get up off his couch and confront the stranger. But before he could take a few steps toward the door, Guyger was “leveling her gun having acquired her target” and firing twice, hitting Jean in the chest. He said the bullet ripped through Jean’s heart, lung and intestine before lodging in his lower back.“No opportunity for de-escalation, no opportunity for him to surrender. Bang, bang. Rapid,” Hermus told the jury.Tracing Guyger’s steps on the day of the fatal incident, Hermus said that despite working a 13 1/2-hour shift on the day of the deadly encounter, she appeared to be planning a rendezvous with her police department partner and lover. He showed the jury text messages Guyger sent her partner moments before the shooting, writing “Wanna touch” and using more sexually explicit language in other text messages.Hermus argued that during her communications with her partner, Guyger became distracted and confused about where she was.“In the last 10 minutes of Bo’s life, Amber Guyger made a series of unreasonable errors, and unreasonable decisions, and unreasonable choices — the kind of choices and decisions that only she could have stopped,” Hermus said.He said Guyger’s apartment was directly beneath Jean’s fourth-floor unit. Not only did Guyger mistakenly park on the wrong floor of the complex, she walked down a long hallway, passing 16 different apartments but failed to realize she was not headed to her front door, Hermus said.Even when she reached Jean’s door and inserted a fob key, she failed to notice she was standing on a red mat, Hermus said. He said Guyger’s apartment did not have a mat outside the door.He said Guyger also failed to do what she was trained as a police officer to do if confronted by someone she suspected was a burglar: Retreat, take cover and call for back-up.“And for her errors … Botham paid the ultimate price,” said Hermus, asking the jury to find Guyger guilty of murder.Self-defense?Defense attorney Robert Rogers told the jury in his opening argument that Guyger was exhausted from working 40 hours in four days, including a long overtime shift helping a SWAT team arrest three robbers.He denied that Guyger, who was still in her police uniform when she shot Jean, was planning to rendezvous that night with her partner, calling the prosecution’s assertion “speculation.”Rogers told the jury that Guyger was keenly aware that residents of her apartment complex had experienced recent break-ins and car burglaries.“Amber was very aware, based on her job, that where she lived was, unfortunately, a high-crime area,” Rogers said.He described the configuration of the South Side Flats apartment complex, where Guyger had lived for about two months, as “a confusing place” with floors in the parking garage and apartment doors not clearly marked.“After this incident, the investigators interviewed and learned that 93 tenants had unintentionally parked on the wrong floor,” Rogers said.He said another 46 tenants who lived on the floors where Guyger and Jean resided had gone to the wrong apartment and placed their key in the door.Rogers said that after working a long shift, Guyger was on “auto-pilot” and didn’t see the red mat at Jean’s door when she inserted the key and noticed that the door was unlocked.He painted the picture of Guyger entering the apartment and seeing the figure of a large individual inside coming toward her, yelling, “Hey! Hey!” and drowning out her orders for him to show her his hands.Rogers said Guyger feared for her life and felt she had to use lethal force to defend herself.“She reacts like any police officer would who has a gun when confronting a burglary suspect,” Rogers said.‘He must want to kill me’While Rogers told the jury they would hear from Guyger themselves, he said that going through the officer’s mind in the split second before she pulled the trigger was, “‘My God, there’s a man in my apartment, and he’s big. He must have a weapon. He must want to kill me because I caught him burglarizing my apartment.’”He said that in that instant, Guyger had no time to retreat and call for back-up as Jean charged within 13 feet of her.“She fires twice because at that time she knows this man ‘is trying to kill me,’” Rogers said.He said Guyger immediately called 911 and asked for paramedics to come quick. He said Guyger told a dispatcher at least 22 times, “I thought I was in my apartment.”Rogers asked the jury to side with Guyger’s claim of self-defense, saying prosecutors are “holding Amber Guyger to an impossible standard” and “making innocent mistakes into evil acts.”“The only justice, in this case, is to find Amber Guyger not guilty,” Rogers said.Jean’s family, including his parents, brother and sister, held a prayer vigil on the steps of the Dallas courthouse Monday morning before entering the courtroom. But attorney Lee Merritt, who represents the family in a pending civil suit against the city of Dallas, said the case is far from a slam dunk for the prosecution.“Anytime you bring a case against a police officer it’s difficult anywhere in the country because there’s so much automatic credibility given to law enforcement officers,” Merritt told ABC News on Sunday. “We’re hoping to see a diverse jury that’s able to critically analyze testimony from law enforcement officers.”Guyger was fired from the Dallas Police Department 18 days after she fatally shot Jean. She had been a member of the department for five years and had been promoted to the department’s elite Crime Response Team.During his funeral in September 2018, Jean was recalled by mourners as a man of many talents: A strong Christian, a beloved friend, dependable work colleague and a gifted singer. Jean’s uncle said he had aspirations of becoming a politician in his native country of Saint Lucia.“The sound of gunshots did not have the resonance to be heard on our small island, but their impact was of nuclear proportions,” Jean’s uncle, Ignatius Jean, told mourners at the funeral. “A nuke had been unleashed on our family by someone charged to protect and serve.”Guyger was initially arrested and charged with manslaughter. But a Dallas County grand jury later indicted her on one count of murder.Guyger’s defense team had requested a change of venue for the trial, arguing Guyger couldn’t get a fair trial in Dallas County because of the publicity surrounding the case.A judge rejected the request. Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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HR chief gets top job at LogicaCMG

first_imgHR chief gets top job at LogicaCMGOn 11 Feb 2003 in Personnel Today Jim McKenna, one of the country’s most influential HR professionals, hasbeen made chief executive of merged technology company LogicaCMG’s UK andIreland operations. The appointment of McKenna, 47 – formerly group HR director of Logica –follows its merger with rival CMG at the end of December. A spokesman for LogicaCMG said as group HRD, McKenna already had operationalresponsibility for the Asia Pacific region, so moving up to head the UKoperation, which employs 7,000 people, was a natural step. “Most of the critical challenges coming up are about integrating bothorganisations as well as ensuring the ongoing robustness of the business,”he said. “It is powerful that we now have a guy with such an HR background andan understanding of integration in charge.” In November, when the merger was announced, Logica said it planned to shed1,400 jobs worldwide, but no decisions had yet been made on what jobs, if any,would go in the UK, said the spokesman. As group HRD, McKenna was Britain’s fourth highest business earner in 2001and was listed third in last year’s Personnel Today list of top 40 people inHR. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. last_img read more

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Has the Antarctic Vortex Split before 2002?

first_imgIn late September 2002, the Antarctic ozone hole was seen to split into two parts, resulting in large increases in ozone at some stations and the potential for significant modification of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-induced ozone loss. The phenomenon was dynamical (a split vortex), causing large increases in stratospheric temperature above stations normally within the vortex. Temperatures at Halley, Antarctica, at 30 hPa increased by over 60 K, and temperatures at South Pole at 100 hPa increased by over 25 K. It is important to know if this has happened before, since if it happens in the future, it would significantly alter the total hemispheric ozone loss due to chlorine from CFCs, particularly if it happens in August or September. Temperatures in winter and spring measured at Halley or the South Pole since 1957 and 1961, respectively, show no other comparable increases until the final warming in late spring, except for two dates in the 1980s at Halley when meteorological analyses show no vortex split. There are very few periods of measurements missing at both Halley and the South Pole, and analyses in those few periods show no vortex split. Measurements in August and September at sites normally near the edge of the vortex show very few suspicious dates, and analyses of those few suspicious dates again show no vortex split. It is concluded that the vortex has probably not split before the final warming since Antarctic records began in the late 1950s, and almost certainly not in August or September.last_img read more

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