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Governor Cuomo Says Businesses Can Require Customers To Wear Masks

first_imgGovernor Cuomo hosts his daily Coronavirus briefing at the Madison Square Boys & Girls Club in Brooklyn, where he was joined by Brooklynites Chris Rock and Rosie Perez. The actors were on hand to promote testing and the wearing of PPE while in public. Image by Kevin P. Coughlin / Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo.BROOKLYN — New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo says that businesses are legally allowed to require customers to wear face masks.The Governor during his Thursday press conference said he’s signing an executive order that allows business owners to deny entry to people who aren’t wearing a mask or face covering.The Governor has stated in the past that he believes the numbers show masks are effective in helping slow the spread of the Coronavirus.To help enforce his point, actors Rosie Perez and Chris Rock joined Cuomo on Thursday to promote mask use and getting tested. Normally saving this portion of his talks for later, Cuomo went straight into discussion about federal action after announcing the latest COVID-19 numbers, which showed 74 deaths on Wednesday. 22 of those people were nursing home residents.The Governor met with President Donald Trump on Wednesday morning, where they discussed additional funding from the federal government.This is something Cuomo has long been pushing for, as he says schools and essential services like police and hospitals will see massive cuts without it.Previously, the federal government passed a stimulus package that resulted in payments averaging at $1,200 per citizen, but more is needed, the Governor says.Looking at the reopening of New York, Cuomo says the economy needs more than just an open door. It needs revitalization, he says.Most of New York has begun Phase One of the reopening schedule, but New York City has yet to meet the metrics.“Once you hit Phase One, you continue to monitor the metrics,” Cuomo said, speaking on the progression of the reopening phases.Reopening New York City is important to Cuomo, as he has referred to it as “an economic engine of the state, the country and the world.” Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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‘Hatching’ young entrepreneurs

first_imgMichigan State University Federal Credit Union supports campus business incubatorby: Karen BankstonMore than half of all young people are interested in entrepreneurship, and a quarter are already self-employed, according to a U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation report. Millennials “have the ideas and innovative qualities of successful entrepreneurs,” the report suggests. “With more guidance, funding and encouragement, this entrepreneurial spirit may just run free and do its part in creating more jobs and helping rescue the economy.”Michigan State University Federal Credit Union is doing its part to spark this spirit by supporting a business incubator on the MSU campus and offering “startUP loans” for small businesses in its tri-county region.The credit union provided a three-year grant to double the size of “The Hatch,” a co-working space where students can pursue their entrepreneurial visions, to more than 2,500 square feet. MSU FCU also offers individual financial education and group workshops at The Hatch on topics like developing a business plan and incorporating a business, says CUES member April Clobes, EVP/chief operating officer for the $2.7 billion credit union with 191,000 members.The Hatch is a shared workspace where students pursuing any field of study can collaborate to develop their business ideas with other students, university fellows, and mentors-in-residence. If they need additional funding once they launch their business, they can apply for an MSU FCU startUP loan, with a low rate on up to $15,000.The loans are designed “to fill in some of the financing gaps, not fund a business in full,” Clobes explains. “They could provide unrestricted funds for marketing, to purchase equipment or develop a prototype on the way to seeking financing.” continue reading » 9SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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10 Questions With Nine Days, Long Island’s Comeback Kids

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York By Kate NalepinskiNine Days, the Long Island-based band best known for their late ’90s pop hit, “Absolutely (Story of a Girl),” is back and better than ever after a 10-year hiatus. In advance of their July 16 album release show at the YMCA Boulton Center in Bay Shore, the Press spoke with the band’s lead singer, John Hampson, and lead guitarist, Brian Desveaux, to discuss their upcoming album, Snapshots, as well as working with legendary music producer Jim Scott and their relentless commitment to making music.Long Island Press: You guys are releasing a full-length album after 10 years out of the music scene. A lot has changed. How do you think your new album will invite new listeners?Brian Desveaux: The single “Green light” went to radio mid-June, so people are going to start hearing it. There’s also a new, re-recorded version of “Absolutely (Story of a Girl),” and it’s much more alive and in-your-face. That’s kind of there to remind people of who we are, since we have been out of the scene for a while. It’s definitely a lot of new music, and it’s closest to the last album, kind of going back to our rock sound…I think people will like it. I guess we’ll see. We did some recordings down here [in Nashville] in 2013, and we talked to some people I knew. John came down. It’s been about a year and a half, and we’re just so pumped to release this. It’s physical. It’s ready to come out.LIP: Brian, you separated from John to work on your country music. Does that mean there’s a strong country-influence on the album?BD: I wouldn’t say there’s a strong country sound in the sense that we went in to make a country record. Maybe lyrically and melodically, it does kind of lean in that direction. I think it had a lot to do with the writers we were working with…And me, like I said, I’ve always been into country as I’ve spent the past 10 years in Nashville. So I think it’s definitely influenced by country. I feel like pop music is just what country music has turned into, so…John Hampson: Making a record is a long process. It’s not like we jumped into this and said, “Hey! Let’s go write a whole record in Nashville!” It was a very natural progression of writing and music. We haven’t put out a record on a label in 10 years, but we still always wrote music. We still recorded music. We still played. I think this was just the natural path of the band. In the end, we not only wrote the record in Nashville with these other guys—which was an awesome experience—it always had to feel like us. It had to sound like the band. Everything had that authentic stamp of connection…Like, “this is a song that feels like me,” or, “Brian wrote this for himself,” and then we bring it to the rest of the band, and everyone puts their two cents in, and then it sounds like Nine Days. So, in terms of Nashville country, the elements are there, but it’s not the focus. It’s just the way it came out.LIP: What motivated you to get back into the music scene after a 10-year break?JH: You got to go back 10 years ago when we wrapped up our time at Epic Records. Everyone in the band kind of realized how difficult the whole process was…I’m not sure how to phrase it, but it felt like pushing that boulder up a hill again. And I think we all felt like, “Oh, crap, I don’t know if I want to do that again.” We all kind of wanted to figure out our lives…Brian went to Nashville. Some of us started families. Some of us started other careers, but none of us ever stopped loving music. I think it had to happen when it happened…We continued to write. We put out an EP, but it just happened that right around 2013, we all reached a point in our personal lives where we felt like we could make Nine Days a priority again. It took a couple years of playing and writing and figuring out what we wanted to do with it, in terms of meeting the right people. It was all a really natural progression of events where we found ourselves really investing in the band, and it felt good, so we kept doing it.BD: It’s like a cycle, I think. Fans of our genre of music, way back in the late ’90s, I think they grew up, too. And we’re recognizable to them as Nine Days. I think it’s just perfect timing for this release.LIP: How does your new album, Snapshot, sound different from your past work?JH: Nine Days really started being a band at this place called the Village Pub in Port Jeff. We did that for about a year and a half, and that was an incredible way to have the band grow. When we started up, we were more acoustic-driven, more Americana, indirectly influenced by Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Neil Young, Counting Crows, and we were trying to tell stories. So, when “Absolutely (Story of a Girl)” blew up, it was an anomaly. It was this three-minute, great pop song, which was awesome, but the band always had its roots in Americana songwriting. Going back to writing with these people in Nashville, it didn’t feel foreign; it felt like we had gone back to how we originated and started the band…So we applied 20 years of musical wisdom to our original sound. For us, it doesn’t sound very different from everything else. It just feels like a 2016 album. It feels great. I love the sound of the record. It’s really strong all the way through the songs.LIP: Back in 2000, The Madding Crowd became a certified gold album due to the success of “Absolutely (Story of a Girl).” Which song do you think is going to be the hit this time, besides the encore version of the same song?BD: I’m hoping it’s “Green Light” because that’s our single. There’s other stuff on this album, though, that’s also story-telling. There are couple others that I think are catchy tunes, like the song on there called “Two Straws,” which we recorded in Nashville. But you never know what’s going to be a hit. It could be anything.JH: I think our goal is to really have this record do what Thriller did in 1983 and have a top Number One hit, and sell 30 million. Totally. No, I’m just kidding.BD: Hey, you gotta shoot the moon, right?LIP: Snapshot was produced by Jim Scott, who’s worked with Wilco, Grace Potter and others. How does this raise the bar for your new album?JH: I loved working with Jim.BD: Jim was awesome. He adapted to us.JH: He had a lot of great motivational sayings in the studio…Helpful, believe it or not. We had talked to a lot of different producers, and there are a lot of great people out there that we love to work with but we wanted to work with one guy. A lot of pop bands today work with multiple producers. We just wanted one guy to be the last set of ears. We had a year and a half of songs and demos, so we needed someone with a fresh perspective. Jim’s track record [of working with artists] is amazing. If it passes his smell test, you know the album is good. The way that he talks about making a record in David Grohl’s Sound City documentary is exactly how we wanted to make this record, and how we like to make them. We’re all live. We’re all in the studio. We’re all playing at the same time with a vintage console with two old microphones.LIP: Are there any misconceptions about your band, or yourselves, that you want to clear up?JH: I don’t even know what the misperception is other than we sing only that one song. We are classified as a one-hit-wonder, and we had one hit, so, yeah, sure, it fits. I’m not going to argue the tag. But I’m a fan of music. I’ve definitely bought albums in my life that had one good song on it and the rest was crap. So, if anybody out there happens to perceive us like, “Oh, that’s probably what their records are,” that would be a misperception. I think our band is a songwriter band. We happened to have one top-hit song. But at the end of the day, we’re songwriters. Brian and I teamed up, and we’ve been playing since we were basically 18 because it just felt right, and it was natural. So, every song is a good song. Whether they’re hits or not is irrelevant. If you’re just looking for a great album, this is it.LIP: Do you fee like when you were starting up, in the beginning of your music career, your goal was more oriented toward being successful?BD: When we started this band, we actually just spent a year writing before we even recorded. I think we grew up listening to albums. And the first couple of albums we put out, we actually put inside the records, like, “Hey, this isn’t our big album. We’re not trying to get a record deal. We just wanted to record some music.” So, for the first few records, we were just making music and putting it out there and playing a lot. I guess, at a certain point, after three records, we really started to showcase ourselves in NYC, making contacts and such. But in the beginning we were just making music.JH: I agree, I think Brian said it right—I was just having this conversation the other day—we had an amazing experience writing and recording the record. Whatever happens after this isn’t really in our control anymore. We let it go into the world, and whatever happens, just happens. That’s one thing that’s different now than when we put out The Madding Crowd. Now we can truly be happy with our record and not be stressed about what happens next.LIP: I always ask artists what they think their lives would be like if they went down a different career path. But I feel like with you guys you went on a different path and simultaneously worked on music. Would you agree?JH: I think that’s exactly what we did, and it kind of came out the other side a little bit. Brian said it before. I think it would have been amazing if we could sustain the band as if it was our top priority. Some of us weren’t willing to make the sacrifices necessary at that point. Like, I knew I wanted a family, and I didn’t want to struggle to support them, or not see them. I didn’t want to be an absentee dad, and I’m okay with that decision. It’s not easy to sustain a career in any artistic endeavor. It requires a ton of energy, effort and sacrifice. I sometimes wonder how much easier my life would be if I didn’t even like music. But I love it! I can’t get away from it. It’ll always be in my life.BD: I came to Nashville to write the most music I could. I figured I’d never leave Nashville unless I quit music completely. But I realized that’s never going to happen. It’s always been there since I heard my first ever KISS record. It’s not even like, “music is life.” It’s just like, “music is us.” We’re never going to let go.LIP: Why is music important to you?JH: I teach English, and that’s what I did as my second career. I always tell my students…I don’t remember a time in my life when music didn’t do something strange, wonderful and all-consuming to me. Music has always been crucial. It’s impossible to answer because I literally can’t remember a time in my life when music didn’t move me or affect me. It’s always there. I’m not sure why. It just is.BD: I’m not sure how to answer this. It just is. The thought of giving up—not just trying to make it as a songwriter, just taking it out of my life—is impossible to consider. I would still walk around, or drive in my car, and music would pop in my head. And that’s where a lot of my stuff comes from. It’s inside of me.last_img read more

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Developer comment

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Gov. Wolf: Access to Food Assistance, Healthcare through Safety-Net Programs Available During COVID-19

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Press Release,  Public Health Governor Tom Wolf today reminded Pennsylvanians that public benefit programs are available to families and individuals who have lost jobs, income and health insurance as a result of the COVID-19 public health emergency. These programs include the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP).“The Department of Human Services held a briefing today to talk about how the department is supporting Pennsylvanians through this public health crisis and in the weeks and months of rebuilding our economy that will follow,” Gov. Wolf said. “These programs are important for so many Pennsylvanians every day, and now more than ever as we face this pandemic together.”Since this crisis began in early March, the department’s Office of Income Maintenance (OIM) has taken many steps to ensure that Pennsylvanians who need help and who qualify for programs are able to access them as quickly as possible. Examples include lifting requirements for face-to-face interviews and temporarily suspending the closure of Medicaid cases except in certain circumstances.DHS has also worked with its partners at the state and federal levels to implement policies that are responsive to the exceptional ways that all of our lives have changed in recent weeks, including extending certification periods for public assistance programs so participation can continue through the public health crisis. On Thursday, DHS began issuing emergency Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits in line with the federal government’s interpretation of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act. Payments include a supplemental increase for both March and April and will continue to be issued for current SNAP households through April 29. DHS is also advising Pennsylvanians in need of food assistance of local supports that can help meet essential needs during the public health crisis.“These programs exist to help all of us in the moments we cannot plan for – the times that an injury or an accident changes our life and sense of security as individuals, and the times that a global pandemic alters our daily life as a society,” DHS Sec. Teresa Miller said. “These programs are needed for many in the best of times, and they are critical in the worst. We cannot forget this when this moment passes.”County assistance offices located in every Pennsylvania county are staffed by OIM caseworkers who are skilled at connecting individuals to benefits they need while also maintaining program integrity and the responsible stewardship of taxpayer dollars. While CAO offices are currently closed to the public in observance of guidance from public health professionals to slow the spread of the COVID-19 virus, work processing applications, determining eligibility, and issuing benefits continues.“At this critical moment, I want Pennsylvanians to know that we are doing everything we can to connect families and individuals who are struggling economically with the programs that, in many cases, they have been supporting with their labor and tax dollars for years,” Sec. Miller said. “The act of submitting an application for SNAP or Medicaid during a time of crisis is an act of advocacy for yourself and your family, and there should be no shame attached to it.”DHS encourages the public to take advantage of the ability to submit applications for all of these programs online at www.compass.state.pa.us. Individuals with a smartphone can also download the mobile app, MYCOMPASS PA, which is available at the App Store or Google Play Store.Applications by mail are also acceptable or they can be dropped off at any County Assistance Office, which are closed to the public but equipped with drop boxes for this purpose. Clients in Philadelphia with questions or information to report about their case should call the Philadelphia Customer Service Center at 215-560-7226. Clients in all other counties can call the Statewide Customer Service Center at 1-877-395-8930.Pennsylvanians can also apply for Medical Assistance by phone by calling the Consumer Service Center at 1-866-550-4355.EBT payments are still scheduled to occur during the closure and activated EBT cards can still be used as usual at ATMs and in stores at point-of-sale machines if the client has a balance. Balance and transaction inquiries, as well as EBT card replacement, can be requested from DHS’s EBT contractor, Conduent, at 888-328-7366.View this information in Spanish.  Gov. Wolf: Access to Food Assistance, Healthcare through Safety-Net Programs Available During COVID-19center_img April 18, 2020last_img read more

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The Latest: NC high school sports allowed to resume June 15

first_img June 8, 2020 Serie A has been suspended since March 9 because of the coronavirus outbreak. It is scheduled to resume on June 20.The plans were approved by an 18-3 vote at an FIGC council meeting. Italian soccer clubs had asked for no champion or relegations unless mathematically certain.Playoffs are the preferred idea but an algorithm will be used to determine the final standings if matches cannot be held because of time restrictions or the worsening of the pandemic. But there will not be a champion if the algorithm is used.The top two men’s divisions are the only ones set to resume their regular seasons. The women’s Serie A will not restart.___ The organization announced Monday that it would allow limited workouts beginning June 15, though education agencies across the Southern U.S. state must also permit it at a local level.Restrictions for the first phase of return include having workouts of no longer than 90 minutes, with no more than 25 people at outdoor venues and no more than 10 in gymnasiums. They also require daily temperature checks and social distancing, along with instructing schools to keep the same groupings of athletes working together each time.Locker rooms and weight rooms remain closed for now. The restrictions include no shared use of athletic equipment. Guidelines for future phases will be developed and shared at a later date.___The Italian soccer federation has approved plans for a playoff or the use of an algorithm with no champion declared if the season is stopped again. Juventus, AC Milan and Sassuolo are the only three clubs which have managed to resume training. Many of the clubs also have players who are still abroad.___More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports The Latest: NC high school sports allowed to resume June 15 Italy’s female soccer players are against the possibility of a playoff format to finish their season.A decision on whether and how the Serie A women’s league will resume is expected to be made during an Italian soccer federation meeting.One of the proposals is to have playoffs. That would involve half of the 12 Serie A teams.A statement by the Serie A women’s players says they are against it because “it doesn’t guarantee true fairness.”They say “we all go out on the field or no one does.” Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditThe Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world:___The North Carolina High School Athletic Association will lift its dead period next week to allow for in-person workouts for prep athletes. Associated Press English soccer club Brighton is offering fans the chance to have cardboard cutouts of themselves in the stadium when the Premier League resumes.Games in the league will be closed to spectators for the remainder of the season because of the coronavirus pandemic.Five of Brighton’s nine remaining games are at home. The first is on June 20 against Arsenal.Fans need to send in a photo wearing a Brighton jersey and pay $25.___last_img read more

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Students to expand Native American group

first_imgNASU members (left to right) Kolton Nephew, Maracea Chase, Josefina Garza and Moakeah Rivera are among the small Native American population at USC. They believe NASU deserves recognition as a cultural presence on campus rather than as a religious group. (Vincent Leo | Daily Trojan) “I didn’t know how to react with so many different cultures around me or not seeing familiar faces or familiar languages spoken,” Nephew said. “I felt like I needed to at least connect with people who had a similar background as me, if not the same nation as me.” “Back at my high school, we had so much support for different Native American groups,” Chase said. “We would host powwows, ceremonies, all the time. It was such a weird transition coming here to USC when none of that is present. It’s opened my eyes, and it’s made me want to bring that kind of community here.”  At its core, NASU membership is a way for students with common experiences to share their culture and build a community, Chase said. Kolton Nephew, a sophomore majoring in political science, grew up on the Navajo Nation reservation in Arizona’s Four Corners region. After transferring from Fort Worth College, a school with a 27% Native American student body, Nephew said he experienced culture shock.  Chase said she also noticed how limited Native American student resources are at USC compared to her high school, which was located near her Navajo reservation.  For some, the challenges of their Native American identities began before college. Vice President Moakeah Rivera said that growing up in the affluent community of Encinitas, she was patronized and treated differently from her peers. While acquiring resources and members are high on the group’s agenda, its main goal is to transition as a member of the Interfaith Council — an umbrella organization of religious groups on campus — to a cultural assembly under USG, like the Black and Latinx student assemblies.  Vice President Moakeah Rivera (left) and President Maracea Chase (right) table on Trousdale Parkway in Fall 2019. (Photo courtesy of Native American Student Union) “We have been told that we don’t have the numbers to be able to make that transition and make our presence known, which is unfortunate because …  it’s not something that we have control over,” Chase said. “Being able to have [the University’s] support would mean so much.”  “[We’re] trying to revise this process so that it’s more feasible for smaller communities on campus to become cultural assemblies,” USG Chief Diversity Officer Jeffrey Cho said. “[We’re] thinking about creating this petition system where, potentially, if enough students sign this petition, then [NASU is] allowed to start the process of becoming a cultural assembly.” However, NASU has repeatedly been denied recognition as an Undergraduate Student Government cultural assembly because of a bylaw that requires that a group be affiliated with five recognized student organizations to become an assembly. But this  may change following a proposed amendment to the bylaw,  allowing organizations to submit a petition of at least 50 signatures to become an assembly under USG. USC is composed of a student body that is 1% Native American, according to a diversity breakdown published by the University in 2016 — a stark difference from Nephew’s first school.center_img The organization is currently categorized as a religious group. As an active member of USC’s Native American Student Union since Fall 2019, Nephew found community in the organization and with its 30 active members, who identify with the club’s goal of establishing a cultural center for Native American students and others interested in Native American issues and culture. “Native Americans are the least funded in their education systems — we’re separated from the rest of the world,” Rivera said. “There’s a lot of things that affect us in our college, in our childhoods that other people can’t understand.” Rivera said tensions between Native American groups and other communities develop when non-Native Americans perceive that Native Americans are receiving special treatment, such as affirmative action. However, she said these policies are necessary to close the gaps in educational opportunities. “We would have a greater voice in how we are represented [if we became an assembly],” Rivera said. “We would also get funding, which would actually help us greatly with advocating and our outreach work … We just want to be treated like every other ethnic group within USG.”  “I was raised in a very privileged area where I was a token,” Rivera said. “I was only treated nicely because I was the only [Native American].”  “[NASU members are] passionate and determined, and in an institution that still doesn’t really choose to recognize us, we’re limited to a religious center,” Nephew said. “That’s demoralizing to us as Native Americans — saying that what we are is more of a religion than who we are as a lifestyle.” Chase added that Native Americans receive comparatively little recognition in postsecondary education. Chase said she was frustrated with the common argument that NASU’s membership is too small to establish it as a cultural assembly. “I think it’s just the struggle that Native American students face in general when it comes to pursuing a second education,” Chase said. “[You’re] always trying to find a little crack, a sliver through to be able to catch up with everyone else.” “When you look at Native American cultures, we’re so family oriented,” Chase said. “It’s just so hard to be away from that, so when we come here as a group of people, we’re able to create our own little family. We’re able to keep our culture, which is amazing.”last_img read more

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Valeria Salazar leads Syracuse to 6-1 win over Florida State

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on April 3, 2016 at 4:04 pm Contact Charlie: csdistur@syr.edu | @charliedisturco Valeria Salazar hit a backhand that landed just past the baseline. Yukako Noi rose her finger to signal that the ball had landed out of bounds. With that failed return, Salazar’s lead tightened to 5-4 in the second set.Salazar then walked over to the bench and sat down. Associate head coach Shelley George came over and sat beside the junior. The two had a mini discussion before the line judge told both players to return to their position for the next game. Salazar took a sip from her bottle and jogged back to the baseline.“She needed to believe in herself and stick to her game plan that was working out there,” George said when Salazar experienced a few struggles. “Don’t panic and we’ll have good things happen in the end.”A few plays later, she found herself ahead 40-15, one point away from winning the match. Salazar bent over, threw the ball in the air and hit the ball towards Noi, who reached her racket out. The ball made contact with the racket, arced in the air. Salazar and all the fans at Drumlins Country Club watched as the ball landed a few feet past the baseline.“Point!” Salazar yelled out, smiling and walking toward the centerline to shake her opponents hand. She had won her singles match 6-3, 6-4 and took home the No. 1 doubles match, securing two points in No. 40 Syracuse’s (10-6, 4-6 Atlantic Coast) 6-1 win over No. 57 Florida State (9-11, 1-9 ACC).AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSalazar did not break under pressure. While there were times when Noi made an attempt at a comeback, Salazar stayed strong by keeping her opponent on the balls of her feet all game. Noi was running often, setting up Salazar with quick-and-easy combinations of both forehands and backhands.As Noi served the ball to Salazar, a quick rally ensued. A backhand by Salazar had Noi run all the way to her right, before Salazar hit another backhand to the opposite corner. While both were returned, Salazar ran up to the middle of the court setting herself up for a forehand that was unreturnable.Noi took a step forward, put her hands on her hips, and exhaled deeply. She was sweating and breathing heavily often in that game. Salazar meanwhile, stayed focused on the task at hand: Making her opponent run hard on every rally.Salazar is the team’s No. 2 singles player and is 7-8 on the year. She mentioned that her serve is among her best qualities, as she pointed out that was one of the many reasons for her win in both singles and doubles against Florida State.“My game plan was to stay low and move her around,” Salazar said about her opponent. “I noticed she would miss (the ball) sometimes or leave the court open.” Commentslast_img read more

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NBA wrap: Paul George leads Thunder to win over Bucks

first_img Kevin Durant says he will go to Nick Collison’s Thunder jersey retirement Paul George took over for Oklahoma City in some critical moments. He made eight of his 12 3-point attempts and finished with 36 points, along with 13 rebounds.Giannis Antetokounmpo tallied 27 points and 18 rebounds, but the Thunder made things tough for him around the rim. He was blocked a career-high seven times in the game, which made all the difference. Oklahoma City showcased its defensive prowess, racking up 10 blocks in all. Related News The Thunder (31-18) pushed their winning streak to five games and snapped the Bucks’ six-game winning streak.Studs of the NightJames Harden had 40 points and 11 rebounds for the Rockets in a 103-98 win against the Magic.Luka Doncic recorded his second career triple-double for the Mavericks. He tallied 35 points, 12 rebounds and 10 assists in a 123-120 loss to the Raptors.Andrew Wiggins scored 35 points as the Timberwolves fell to the Jazz, 125-111.Ivica Zubac had 24 points and 16 rebounds in the Lakers’ 116-102 win against the Suns.Duds of the NightRussell Westbrook scored 13 points on 5-of-20 shooting in the Thunder’s win.Josh Richardson shot 3-of-10 from the field in a 12-point performance as the Heat beat the Knicks 106-97.HighlightsRudy Gay went baseline for a slam in the Spurs’ 132-119 win over the Wizards. Russell Westbrook on if he’s cool with Joel Embiid: ‘F— no’center_img Watch your head, @RudyGay 😯#GoSpursGo pic.twitter.com/iPDeja5p54— San Antonio Spurs (@spurs) January 28, 2019Wayne Selden hung in the air on this no-look assist to Bobby Portis, but the Bulls fell short to the Cavaliers 104-101.Wayne Selden finds BP with the no-look pass 🔥 pic.twitter.com/yqEQ5od4QK— Chicago Bulls (@chicagobulls) January 27, 2019What’s Next?Nets (27-23) at Celtics (30-19) 7:30 p.m. ET — Brooklyn is one of the hottest teams in the Eastern Conference, as its riding a six-game winning streak while the Celtics lost a close game to the Warriors in TD Garden on Saturday. The Nets will enter the game directly behind Boston in the standings. The Thunder and Bucks had a heated matchup in Oklahoma City on Sunday.While the Bucks (35-13) trailed by 14 at the half, a second-half surge brought them back into the game late. But the Thunder ended up claiming a 118-112 victory.last_img read more

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The Northern Trust: Troy Merritt leads the pack after Round 1

first_imgFind you a hype man like @TroyMerritt_PGA’s caddie. pic.twitter.com/05gD3O0rLH— PGA TOUR (@PGATOUR) October 7, 2018“We’re in a good position now to contend for the championship,” Merritt told reporters after his round. “That’s why we tee it up each week. Obviously this week, it’s a little bit different with just trying to get into next week … and now we can shift our focus from winning the golf tournament.”Dustin Johnson finished in second at 8-under 63. He’s confident he can continue to do well because of how familiar he is with the course.”It’s a golf course I like. We played here in The Presidents Cup a couple years ago and I’ve played a couple other events here,” Johnson said. “I really like the golf course. I think it sets up well for me, and with the conditions, you’ve got to hit really good shots if you want to get it close to the hole. But with the soft conditions, you can be kind of aggressive.” Tiger Woods digs deep early hole at Northern Trust The Northern Trust teed off Thursday and Troy Merritt surprisingly came out on top at the end of Round 1.The 33-year-old has three career professional victories, with two of those coming on the PGA Tour.  He was on fire in Round 1 and tied a Liberty National Golf Course record by shooting a 9-under 62.Have yourself a day, @TroyMerritt_PGA. 👏#LiveUnderPar pic.twitter.com/TMGk9GIaVC— PGA TOUR (@PGATOUR) August 8, 2019He made some clutch putts along the way. Related News Kevin Kisner and Jon Rahm finished in a tie for third at 7-under 64 while Tony Finau, Rory McIlroy, Webb Simpson and Justin Rose are in a four-way tie for fifth at 6-under 65.Tiger Woods, meanwhile, struggled Thursday. He shot a 4-over 75 and is in a tie for 116th place.last_img read more

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