Category: cnnwibmv

Highlights of the Week

first_imgUSPA Announces Tender for New Berth at Mykolaiv PortThe Ukrainian Sea Port Authority (USPA) has invited bidders to submit their offer for construction of new berth No. 8 in the Mykolaiv Port. Dredging Today Conference: Climate Change Is Real, Better Be PreparedClimate change is real, so better be prepared. Everybody, personally and also as an industry, should make a contribution in fighting climate change. That was the final thought of our first Dredging Today Conference… Van Oord Bags Port of Beira Dredging ContractVan Oord, a Dutch contracting company that specializes in dredging and land reclamation, has been contracted by CFM – the ports and railways company of Mozambique – to carry out emergency dredging works in the Port of Beira. Dredging Today brings you an overview of the most popular stories from the past week (October 30 – November 5, 2017).center_img Royal IHC Lays Keel for New Cutter Suction Dredger JarashThe keel laying ceremony for the new 900kW cutter suction dredger (CSD) Jarash took place last month at the Royal IHC shipyard in Kinderdijk, the Netherlands. The Largest Cutter Suction Dredger in Asia Hits the WaterThe Tiankun, the largest and most advanced cutter suction dredger (CSD) in Asia, was launched today in Qidong, East China’s Jiangsu Province.last_img read more

Read More »

Lisa Beth Jenkins Wilson

first_imgIn lieu of flowers, family requests memorial contributions to the American Cancer Society or to Klemmes Corner United Church of Christ.  To sign the online guestbook or to leave a personal condolence please visit www.cookrosenberger.com.  The staff of Cook Rosenberger Funeral Home is honored to care for the family of Lisa J. Wilson. Those surviving who will cherish Lisa’s memory include her husband of 37 years, Kris Wilson; sons, Kyle M. (Chelsea Leeder) Wilson of Monmouth, IL and Tyler (Amber Oakes) Wilson of Hamilton, OH; her mother, Carolyn S. Jenkins and brother, Matthew (Joani) Jenkins, both of Fortville; mother-in-law, Maribel Wilson of Brookville; and brothers-in-law, Stephen (Joey) Wilson of Pine, CO and Michael (Sharon) Wilson of Brookville.  She was preceded in death by her father Bud Jenkins, Jr. and father-in-law, George A. Wilson. Lisa Beth Jenkins Wilson, of Brookville, was born on August 17, 1956 in Indianapolis, the daughter of Francis S. “Bud” and Carolyn Suiter Jenkins, Jr.  She attended Ball State University, earning both a B.A. and an M.A. Lisa taught for Sunman-Dearborn Community Schools for 34 years, first at East Central and then the newly opened Sunman-Dearborn Middle School, and retired in 2012.  She met the love of her life, Alan “Kris” Wilson shortly after starting her teaching career and they were married on March 15, 1980 at Fortville Christian Church.  Lisa was a member of the Tri Kappa Sorority, Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority, Dearborn County Retired Teacher Association and Klemme’s Corner United Church of Christ.  She also served a term on the Hanover College Parents Association Board.  Lisa loved spending time with her family and friends and enjoyed traveling.  On Tuesday, November 7, 2017, at the age of 61, she passed away at her residence after a lengthy illness.center_img Friends may visit with the family on Friday, November 10, 2017 from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. at Klemmes Corner United Church of Christ.  A Celebration of Lisa’s life will be led by Kathi Elliott at 1p.m and burial will follow in the church cemetery.last_img read more

Read More »

RCCF makes food pantry grants

first_imgSandra Wagner, Sunman food pantry (L) and Amy Streator, Executive Director, Ripley County Community Foundation (R).Batesville, In. — The Ripley County Community Foundation recently presented a Proactive grant from Emergency Food & Shelter Program to support all 8 of Ripley County’s Food Pantries. The foundation donated a total of $13,800 was granted.last_img

Read More »

5-year IMCA sponsor Penske Racing Shocks gives Modified, Late Model, Stock Car awards

first_imgREADING, Pa. – Drivers in three IMCA divisions are in the running for contingency awards from Penske Racing Shocks again in 2017.The Reading, Pa., manufacturer and five-year IMCA sponsor gives product certificates valued at $350, $250 and $150, respec­tively, to top three eligi­ble finishers in each of the five regions for IMCA Modifieds and in both IMCA Sunoco Stock Car regions.Certificates in the same dollar increments will be awarded to eighth, ninth and 10th place finishers in national standings for IMCA Late Models.Modified and Stock Car drivers are required to compete with four Penske shocks, display two Penske decals on their race car and return a sign-up form to the IMCA home office by Aug. 1.All awards will be presented during the national IMCA banquet in November or mailed beginning the following week from the home office.More information about Penske shocks is available by calling 610 375-6180, at the www.penskeshocks.com website and on Facebook.“Penske returns to our contingency sign-up program to recognize and reward their loyal custom­ers in 2017,” commented IMCA Marketing Diretor Kevin Yoder. “Programs like this add depth to our sign-up offerings and give racers great options on shock packages.”last_img read more

Read More »

Rodgers: Title bid is over

first_img Press Association A 1-1 draw at West Brom on Sunday left the Reds eight points behind leaders Arsenal, who visit Anfield at the weekend. Liverpool’s main priority is staving off the challenge of Everton and Tottenham, one and two points behind respectively, to retain their current fourth place. “I think for us, as a team, it’s too early for that,” said Rodgers of a title challenge, which he always maintained was an outside chance. “I was at the Manchester City-Chelsea game the other night and I look at the squads they have, which they have built up over the last few years, and it’s very difficult for us even though we have competed right the way through the season. “So, I wouldn’t say for us this year, no. We wouldn’t be challengers for it.” Rodgers, who on Sunday said if Liverpool qualified for the Champions League this season they would be a year ahead of schedule, added on Sky Sports: “Will we play a part in it (the title race)? Yes, we will, because we are professional and we want to fight to finish as high as we possibly can. “We look it and there are six points between us and (second-placed) Chelsea, so there is still a lot to play for and we will be fighting right until the very end. “But, if I’m asked to give an honest answer, I’d probably say that this year is too soon for us.” center_img Liverpool manager Brendan Rodgers has ruled his side out of the title race but is confident they can have an impact on it.last_img read more

Read More »

Mike Williamson hoping Wolves loan will provide relief from Magpies woes

first_img The defender has joined Wolves on loan for a month after failing to force his way into Steve McClaren’s Magpies side. Williamson has made just two Capital One Cup appearances this term, despite second-bottom Newcastle’s troubles in the Barclays Premier League. Mike Williamson wants to move on from his Newcastle struggles. Last season he was also accused of deliberately getting himself sent off by former boss John Carver in the defeat at Leicester, but the ex-Portsmouth man is keen to forget his old problems. “It’s in the past, it was a difficult time and there was a lot of pressure on people’s shoulders and people react in different ways. It’s gone now though,” said the centre-back, who could make his debut in Wolves’ Sky Bet Championship game at Birmingham on Saturday. “Now it’s an opportunity to play football. My chances have been limited and it’s frustrating but is part of the job. It’s a fresh challenge. “It’s hard to predict (whether he has a future at Newcastle). I’m just going to come here and do the best I can and show I have a lot of football left in me.” The 31-year-old leaves Newcastle with McClaren under pressure following their start, which included Sunday’s 3-0 derby defeat at Sunderland. Williamson believes they are suffering from a lack of know-how, but backed McClaren to turn Newcastle around. “If you had the answers you’d be a rich man,” he said. “It’s been difficult, the transition in the summer with the staff and we lost a lot of experienced players – Jonas Gutierrez and Ryan Taylor. Young exciting players have come in who are abundantly talented but maybe lack Premier League experience. “Once they find their feet I have no doubt they’ll be fine, they have a fantastic manager and great ability. In the last month Newcastle have dramatically improved. The derby at the weekend was an injustice. The manager is building solid foundations.” center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

Read More »

LGBT Center director brings pride to USC

first_imgKatie Chin | Daily TrojanOut and proud · Harrison grew up in Kansas, but she did not become involved with the LGBT community until she was in college. Harrison attended University of Missouri-Kansas City and Northwestern University.USC’s LGBT Resource Center director, Reverend Kelby Harrison, wasn’t always involved in the LGBT community. “I grew up in Wichita, Kan. … Kansas is fairly conservative, and I didn’t come out as gay until I was a teenager,” Harrison said. However, that changed when Harrison attended Northwestern University for her doctorate degree. “I left for college [at the University of Missouri-Kansas City] and then went to Northwestern for my Ph.D. program, and that’s where I really got involved with the LGBT community,” Harrison said. “I was openly gay by the time college was over, but it wasn’t until I got to Chicago that I connected with the campus communities and off-campus communities and got involved in activism.”Harrison founded  Northwestern’s first-ever LGBT graduate student organization, the Queer Pride Graduate Student Association, and through that group, also founded the Queertopia conference, where graduate students from across the nation came to share their academic research on LGBT-related issues. The LGBT community even found its way into Harrison’s education. She graduated from the University of Missouri-Kansas City with a degree in philosophy and ethics, but her doctorate from Northwestern was in ethics, gender and sexuality. Harrison went on to publish her dissertation for the degree as a book Sexual Deceit: The Ethics of  Passing which explores the morals behind passing, or presenting oneself as one thing while one’s identity is something else. The book specifically explores queer individuals who pass as heterosexual. However, LGBT issues weren’t all that Harrison became passionate about in graduate school. It was there that she also rediscovered a love for faith and spirituality. “I loved religion as a child … but I broke from religion at about 16, when I started figuring out how misogynistic and homophobic religion could be,” Harrison said. “But in graduate school, I came back to Liberal Christianity … that led me to getting a job as a postdoctoral fellow at the Union Theological Seminary, which is kind of known for being the premier social justice seminary in the country, very much dedicated to black liberation theology [and] LGBT inclusion.”It was while teaching at the seminary that Harrison became ordained as a reverend, at a similarly LGBT-inclusive church, the Metropolitan Community Church. After leaving the seminary, Harrison came to Los Angeles. While she initially came to Southern California as a hospital chaplain for the UCLA Santa Monica Medical Center, she soon found that USC was her true calling. “I wasn’t in Los Angeles very long before I figured out that USC was the school of choice around here. It very much reminds me of Northwestern, [so] I started looking for employment at USC,” Harrison said. “I kept my eye on the University … and [when] this position came to open, and it was absolutely ideal. It was the combination of both my academic studies, my activism and the institution I wanted to work at. I got lucky.”Harrison has worked to improve the quality of life for LGBT students and increase their presence on campus. She successfully advocated for the addition of the Lavender Lounge, a safe space for LGBT students to unwind and interact, which more than doubled the LGBT Resource Center’s space on campus. Just two years ago, USC’s LGBT center was found to be the smallest among top academic institutions.“She was really passionate about getting that student lounge … the moment we had that space officially and no one could take it back, she was so excited,” said Erica Kirk, former lead graduate assistant at the LGBT Resource Center. ”It was finally a place for students to hang out where we weren’t all on top of each other,” Aside from the Lavender Lounge, Harrison has dedicated her days to making USC more inclusive. She worked with the Title IX office at USC to get an all-gender restroom next to the LGBT Resource Center, created peer support systems for members of the LGBT community and was even recognized nationally for making USC welcoming for international LGBT students.However, Harrison’s true passion for being the center’s director lies in working with individual students, according to Michael Gorse, the LGBT Resource Center supervisor. He’s been working with Harrison for more than three years, both as a graduate assistant at the center while studying at USC, and as center supervisor now. “She really enjoys working with students one-on-one … she’s able to develop personal connections with the students she’s working with at the center,” Gorse said. “She’s very good at and willing to listen to people non-judgmentally and connect with them.”Kirk said that Harrison fosters such strong relationships with students on campus because she goes above and beyond to show them she cares.“She is infinitely empathetic,” Kirk said. “She still emails me about my job search, and checks in on me. It could have very easily been like, ‘Okay, you don’t work for me anymore, we’re done,’ but she takes the time to check in, and see where I’m at and I’m sure she does that will with all of her staff, and all of the students she comes in contact with, because she cares, a lot.”Despite all the successes she’s had as the resource center director, Harrison has even bigger goals in mind for the LGBT center. “In upcoming years, we’re going to … really begin to focus on queer and trans students of color, focusing more on inclusivity efforts for students of color, and working more closely with the other cultural centers on campus,” Harrison said. Another effort that the center is working on is providing resources for the mental health of LGBT students. “Last week, we both went to San Jose [to become] instructors so we can train our student staff and colleagues on how to help someone who presents mental health issues or a mental health crisis … Kelby’s been doing a lot of work on expanding our understanding [of mental health], as well as services that are offered for students who are experiencing mental health issues,” Gorse said.Beyond working at the LGBT Resource Center, Harrison is still able to utilize her background in faith and religion. She works at the Office of Religious Life as the Dean of Spirituality and Sexuality, allowing her to help students work through the intersectionality of their faith and sexual orientation or gender identity, which she knows from firsthand experience can be a difficult path to navigate alone. “[After] being in the world of religion for a number of years, it’s nice to still have that connection to the world of religion through USC,” Harrison said. Through her life’s work in spirituality, ethics and queer advocacy, Harrison finds fulfillment in seeing real progress for the LGBT community.“It’s really satisfying to see institutions get better around LGBT issues … I have watched USC grow; I watched Northwestern grow,” Harrison said. “Right now, there are rainbow flags all along [Trousdale Parkway], which is lovely. We didn’t even have to put pressure on the school to do it. It’s so great to see that positive institutional reaction. I think it’s a modern sign of ethical improvement, when institutions get better.”last_img read more

Read More »

Dajuan Coleman faces 1st conference test after strong end to nonconference slate

first_img Published on December 29, 2015 at 5:20 pm Contact Jon: jrmettus@syr.edu | @jmettus Facebook Twitter Google+ Dajuan Coleman corralled a bounce pass from Malachi Richardson with his right hand, took a step forward, planted his left foot then right just behind the foul line, and sprung into the air to sink the 16-foot shot.“We don’t love him taking that jump shot,” interim head coach Mike Hopkins said. “But when he takes it and makes it I’m like, ‘He’s going to have a great game. Dajuan’s in his zone.’”Coleman has been “in his zone” more than ever recently. He matched his career-high of 14 points on Sunday and in the last two games against Montana State and Texas Southern, SU’s last nonconference games, he scored more than 10 points for the first time in back-to-back games in his career.Though the senior center’s been hitting his stride offensively as of late — his defense is still a work in progress — the real test for Coleman will be when Syracuse (10-3) starts Atlantic Coast Conference play at Pittsburgh (10-1) at 9 p.m. on Wednesday.“Everybody has to be pretty happy with what he’s done,” suspended head coach Jim Boeheim said on his radio show Monday night. “Obviously, we’re just starting and there’s a lot more to be played. But he certainly, at this stage, has exceeded expectations, I think in terms of how he’s moving on offense.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSeven weeks ago, Coleman suited up for the Orange’s exhibition against Le Moyne. It was also his first game in nearly two years after rehabbing a twice-injured and repaired left knee.  Four weeks ago, in the Orange’s loss to Wisconsin, Coleman registered a season-low five minutes and zero points.It’s “impossible to tell” how far Coleman has come since the beginning of the season, Hopkins said. But his four double-digit outings in the last six games are up from the two-plus points he was averaging in the seven games prior.In 13 minutes of second-half action on Sunday, Coleman grabbed all seven of his rebounds and scored 10 of his 14 points. Five of them came on second-chance opportunities, which is how, he said, he’s going to score his points.In each of the last two games, Coleman was able to knock a defender down with his body and finish with a layup.“Just being aggressive in the paint,” Coleman said.  “Being aggressive going for the boards. That’s what I’m going to score off.”The Orange’s emphasis on the 3-point shot has opened up space and chances for its big men like Coleman, Tyler Lydon and Tyler Roberson and, Boeheim said, the trio needs to take advantage of them.Defensively, though, Coleman looked vulnerable on Sunday, even against one of the nation’s smallest teams. He showed flashes of his ability, including one of his four steals where he stepped up to stuff TSU’s Jose Rodriguez at the high post. But Derek Griffin, TSU’s big man, netted 20 points.He fielded lobs behind Coleman for alley-oop dunks and lay-in baskets in front of the center as the Tigers scored 34 points in the paint.“Defensively, we know that that quickness, that lateral movement is not there yet,” Boeheim said. “But I think he still made great strides and is doing some great things for us right now.”Syracuse is done with nonconference play, though, and instead of facing some of the country’s smallest teams, it’ll face some of the biggest, such as Miami on Saturday.Coleman and Lydon said their expectations for the former against Pitt are the same as they were for Texas Southern. Despite the increased level of competition down low, Hopkins said SU, a team that has struggled in the paint, needs the same performance that Coleman produced on Sunday, as it heads into ACC play.“We need seven rebounds in 20 minutes,” Hopkins said. “We need that physical presence so when we play against guys in our league he’s banging, battling, putting his weight on those guys, tiring them out on both ends of the floor.” Commentslast_img read more

Read More »

Morgan Widner and Julie Cross to share SU’s draw control duties to start the season

first_img Published on February 15, 2018 at 12:03 am Contact Nick: nialvare@syr.edu | @nick_a_alvarez Morgan Widner jogged out to the block “S” on Ernie Davis Legends Field this past Friday and prepped for her specialty: draw controls. She starred in 2017, starting every game and finishing with the seventh-best draw percentage in the country (70.9).Now on the precipice of her sophomore season, she stood next to Connecticut’s Sydney Watson and readied for the whistle. When it blew, Watson muscled Widner off her spot and won the draw.Watson scored 40 seconds later.On the next draw, Watson beat Widner again, and Syracuse’s draw control specialist fell to the ground. As Widner made it to the sidelines to regroup, Watson scored again. Julie Cross, Widner’s backup, attempted the third draw and she lost, too. The fourth, fifth and sixth draws of the game held the same result.“We weren’t really effective.” SU head coach Gary Gait said of the draws after the Feb. 9 matchup. “… Every time the ball came flying out to that circle, it was going to them.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textPlaying in the first game after a shortened fall-ball season, Gait credited Cross and Widner’s issues to a “lack of fundamentals.” The duo settled in after the initial bombardment, won 17 of the next 26 draws, and brought the draw controls to an even 18 for the game. No. 5 Syracuse’s (1-0) eventually coasted to a season-opening 23-11 rout. Postgame, Gait said that the pair might continue to switch off at the faceoff X in 2018.Widner set Syracuse’s freshman-record for draws (156) last year. Cross, a junior, totaled 17 in her first two seasons at SU. The Orange will look to find the right draw control combination when it flies west to take on Oregon for the first time in program history on Feb. 18.“We kind of go with the flow,” Gait said. “Certain people match up better with certain draw people. We’ll give both an opportunity and read the game as it goes. … I certainly have a good understanding of the type of (draw) people that Morgan is strong against and Julie is a good counter against the other type.”During last year’s ACC Tournament, Cross spelled Widner as a change-of-pace draw specialist. Cross earned 11 draws in a two-game stretch, her highest two-game total of her career. Widner posted a career-worst four draws in the same span. A similar stat line occurred against the Huskies. Cross finished with eight draw controls, a new single-game best. Widner corralled one draw, tying a career-low.Gait and Widner identified two types of draw specialists: ones that rely on strength and others that focus on finesse. A strength, or power, specialist uses their upper-body more than a finesse drawer who depends on hand-eye coordination and their wrists, Widner said.Widner utilizes a finesse technique and Cross, SU’s tallest-player at 6-foot-1, is a power specialist. UConn’s Watson, a strength-drawer, surprised Widner because the Orange had no film of the freshman to review.After each loss, Cross, Widner and Gait met on the sidelines to think of an adjustment. It’s a luxury Widner and Cross have, since both of them almost never get onto the field besides to take draws. The trio think about draw controls as a chess game, Widner said, and they were currently being-outmatched by a freshman.“You have to think,” Widner said, “what is the other person doing? Based off what they are doing, how are we going to counteract that play?”Cross said she and Widner are practicing against each other more this season than last. Part of the reason, she said, was to adjust to the new rule changes that limit the number of players that can compete for the ball before possession is established.While attackers worked their way through obstacles and shot at an open net during a recent practice, defenders worked with the goalkeepers on opposite ends of the field. At midfield, Widner and Cross battled and Gait watched over them.“Coming back this week,” Gait said, “… they had an understanding. You got to stay with your technique, you got to focus on it and not necessarily overreact to somebody’s style or the way they’re doing something that maybe you’re not used to.”In the waning minutes of the first half against UConn, Widner ran off the field and over to Gait after losing a draw. She looked up at her coach and shrugged her shoulders. Behind the SU bench, Gait grabbed a stick and held it out in front of him, simulating a draw as a teaching moment.Molly Ford, Widner’s coach at Coppell (Texas) High School, called Widner “naturally gifted,” at the faceoff X. That skill carried her last year — and earned her an Inside Lacrosse All-American Honorable Mention nod — but not against Connecticut. With 10 currently-ranked teams on the Orange’s schedule, Widner will hope that last Friday’s game was a bump in the road rather than the start of a trend, or else Cross can expect an increased role.“Morgan has more success against certain types of draw people and she knows that,” Gait said. “I just told her, ‘You need to develop the other techniques so you can have success against everybody. … That’s her goal this year: to learn how to do that.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Read More »

Mikel Craves to Achieve Something  Special with Middlesbrough

first_imgIn an interview with the Middlesbrough official website, Mikel stated that several clubs were interested in him but a conversation with Tony Pulis convinced him.He said, “For me, it’s looking at the project. I spoke to a few clubs and I also spoke to Tony (Pulis), had a good chat with him. He’s told me where he wants to go with it and it definitely fits with what I want to do. The club wants to get promoted so hopefully I’m here to help in any way I can. It’s a family club and this is what I want. I like stability and this is why I was at Chelsea for a very long time.”Without putting any pressure on himself, Mikel stated that he is a team player and despite his impressive trophy cabinet it is only as a team can they achieve their goal to qualify for the Premier League.He said, “We have to put our heads together and help each other. If anyone knows me from my years at Chelsea, I always played for the team. The team comes first and that’s exactly what I’m going to do here. Here is going to be a challenge, but I love challenges.”The Super Eagles captain who quit his contract at Chinese Super League (CSL) side Tianjin Teda has been handed the number 2 shirt and could make his debut when Middlesbrough take on Newport County in a FA Cup encounter today at the Riverside Stadium.Meanwhile, former Premier League champions, Chelsea have reacted to Obi joining English Championship side, Middlesbrough, on a six-month deal.Chelsea took to their official Twitter page, @ChelseaFC, to congratulate Mikel and wished him good luck at his new club, Middlesbrough.“Good luck at Middlesbrough, @Mikel John Obi!,” Chelsea tweeted alongside a picture of Mikel wearing the Blues’ jersey.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Super Eagles captain Mikel Obi has stated that he wants to help Middlesbrough achieve something special this season.The Nigerian midfielder sealed a return to England with Championship side Middlesbrough who are in contention to get a promotion to the Premier League next season.Mikel who is now 32 years old is hopeful that the impact of the younger players at Middlesbrough coupled with his wealth of experience will help the club to be promoted to Premier League. last_img read more

Read More »

FashionBuzz © 2015 | All Rights Reserved Theme by Flythemes